A measure of the rate at which electric charge is transported (especially through a circuit), it has units of charge/time.

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Why is voltage essential in circuits?

I understand what voltage is, but why is it necessary for an electric circuit to function? Why can't current flow without a voltage? Thanks
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24 views

Reducing eddy currents, changes the property of the conductor & circuit?

In an attempt of reducing the eddy currents in a conductor, such as having gaps to break the induced eddy currents, would that by any chance change the conductor's orientation from series to parallel? ...
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37 views

Fringing effect of electric current

We know the what is the fringing effect of electric field in capacitor, of magnetic field in some in some solenoid or magnetic field in through joint of some metal. But is there is something similar ...
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17 views

surface current density

Surface current density, K is defined as: K = σv where σ is surface charge density and v is velocity. Given a uniformly charged spherical shell with radius R, spinning at constant angular velocity ω, ...
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27 views

Why, microscopically, is the voltage drop across a resistor affected by the current through it?

If voltage is a potential difference, describing how much energy will be lost per unit charge as charge carriers pass through the resistor, why would the rate at which charge flows (i.e. current, ...
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1answer
25 views

Calculating resistance [duplicate]

I am really confused please help me! I want to find the resistance between a and b! But i am not able to understand which resistances are in series or which are in parallel! What i think- e and a ...
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28 views

Current density defined by the scattering operator

I have a problem with the definition of the current density. In most literature it is defined as $j^\mu=\frac{i}{2}(S^*\frac{\partial S(A)}{\partial A_\mu(x)})$. I understand that normally we use ...
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46 views

Which is more important, current or potential difference?

If i have a bulb rated 4V, 4A, and my power source is 2V, 2A. Should I use a step up or step down transformer to make it 4V, 1A or 1V, 4A? Which wold make it glow brighter?
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24 views

How to implement the form of current density in a Hall Effect related calculation?

Please consider the following; Question. A rectangular plate of semiconducting material has dimensions 10mm x 4mm x 1mm. A current of 3 mA flows along the length and a Hall Voltage of 13.6 mV is ...
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41 views

Resistor cube problem solving method

I was solving problems from Irodov when I came across the method called point of symmetry method. I cant find this method anywhere. So what is this method? Here is the link to the problem solution ...
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11 views

Is their a visual difference between air-gap sparks of the same voltage but different current?

For example, if this spark gap has a kilovolt of power behind it @ 1A and the other is also at a kilovolt but is @2A will there be a visual difference (i.e. will the one with higher current be ...
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21 views

Is it possible to raise the voltage of a power source by lowering its current indefinitely (i.e. transformers)?

Let's say you have a D battery. You wire it up to the primary of a step-up transformer, which you then in turn wire up to another step-up transformer,...etc. Is there a limit to how high the voltage ...
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38 views

The standard definition of current

The book says current is the rate of flow of charge per unit time, but I don't understand whether it is rate of flow of charge through a single cross-sectional area per unit time or the entire amount ...
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1answer
37 views

Resistance and potential difference across it

I have this question that has baffled me for hours now. My question is what really happens when charge passes from one point to another in a circuit for eg what happens when it passes over a ...
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0answers
23 views

Calculating current on power line from induced voltage on nearby loop

The question I'm having trouble with is: A small circular loop of 5mm radius is placed 1 meter away from a 60Hz power line. The voltage induced on this loop is measured at 0.6 microvolts. What is the ...
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0answers
53 views

Noether Current and Feynman Diagrams

My question is simple. Assume that there is no anomaly and we have found from the lagrangian that there is a conserved current. I want to know what this means in terms of feynman diagrams, not in ...
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3answers
41 views

Where to start from and how to proceed for finding the resistance here? [closed]

Can anyone kindly help me in finding the effective resistance between A and B in the below goven case ? Each resistor is of 16 ohm .. Thank you .
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1answer
54 views

The image current due to moving charges and a current carrying thin wire

Suppose we have a plane conductor and positive charged particles of mass m are moving parallel to the plane conductor at a distance d. The trajectory can be assumed to be straight. An image current ...
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52 views

What should the length of my wire be in order to get a surface area of 10cm^2?

I would like to make a flat coil out of a steel wire that is $1.22 ~\text{mm}$ in thickness (or $1.22~\text{mm}$ in diameter). I wish to make the coil up the wire into a flat disk that has a surface ...
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139 views

Does “ac current” mean that the electricity goes left and right or just changes polarity?

AC goes one way in one phase and the opposite way in the other phase, but is going right and to left, or is it only changing the polarity from (-) to (+)? If light bulbs turn off and on (so fast we ...
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1answer
19 views

Magnetic field between two rings

Two rings are placed parallel atop each other along an axis with a distance $\epsilon$ which is much smaller than the radius of both rings a. Through one of the rings there is a current I and through ...
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1answer
28 views

Current and current density

Current, $I$, is generalised as: $I=\iint_{A}^{} \vec{J}. d\vec{A}$. I know that current density always points in the direction of flow of positive charge. I wonder if the infinitesimal element, ...
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31 views

What does it mean when we say that power of a bulb is 10 W? Since $V/I=$ resistance is a constant, how can power $=VI$ be a constant?

My question is simple. In Ideal situation, at constant temperature, we know that normal appliances like a filament bulb has straight Voltage vs Current graph, meaning its resistance is constant or ...
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Current Density Boundary Conditions and its Implications

According to Ohm's Law, one can say $ \overline{J} =\sigma \overline{E} $ if the field is in a conductor, and $ \overline{J} =0 $ if it's in empty space. Now if we take the surface of a conductor and ...
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What is the physical meaning of $\overline{\Psi} \Psi$ in the Dirac current's “Gordon Decomposition”?

When writing the Dirac (charge) current out in a way that resembles the (charge) current in the Pauli/Schrödinger theories, one obtains the following: $ j^\mu = -\frac{\mathrm{i} e\hbar}{2m} \left[ ...
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54 views

How do you calculate maximum current density for alternating currents?

I think the answer is neither here nor on Wikipedia but forgive me if it is, I don't read maths well. This question applies specifically to current density during transcranial stimulation with either ...
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46 views

Is it low current or low voltage that dims a bulb?

At times we have dim bulbs due to some fault from national grid, what I want to know is if this fault is low current or low voltage. Other times electrical appliances blow-up, is that high current or ...
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33 views

current flow between two points

I can measure a voltage that is induced on my skin from a 50hz electromagnetic field (emf) source using a multimeter, how can I measure the induced current flowing between my finger and ground when I ...
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1answer
34 views

Why does 50/60hz waveform sometimes appear to change direction when imaged on an oscilloscope?

http://www.shutterstock.com/video/clip-32898-stock-footage-an-old-oscilloscope-demonstrates-a-waveform.html The video above displays a waveform moving from left to right. This is generally how my ...
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1answer
35 views

Is the magnetic field calculated by Ampere's Law only because of the currents crossing the loop? [duplicate]

In Ampere's Law, $$\oint \vec B \cdot \mathrm d \vec l = \mu I$$ the current outside the curve is not included on the right hand side of the equation.* Does it mean that the magnetic ...
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13 views

What is the effect of a magnetic field on a plasma speaker?

I have been doing some research for the past couple years investigating the effect of a magnetic field on a plasma speaker. More specifically, if you apply a relatively uniform magnetic field in no ...
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37 views

How to apply voltage source in FEM when solve Maxwell equation?

I need to solve the Maxwell equation of electric field by finite element method. In this function, the right hand side is the current density. However, in my problem, the voltage source with 1 MHz ...
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42 views

How is resistance defined when there is no current?

By definition, a component has a resistance of $1\Omega$ if a potential difference of $1$V makes a current of $1$A flow through it. So I was a bit confused when I saw somewhere "a filament lamp has a ...
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18 views

Inductor in transformer

In an inductor, a current waveform 90 degrees out of phase with the voltage waveform creates a condition where power is alternately absorbed and returned to the circuit by the inductor. If the ...
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0answers
37 views

Is shaking a phone enough energy to charge a smartphone?

Is shaking a phone enough energy to charge a smartphone? For example I'd like to use some kind of power generator to charge smartphone's battery but I'm wondering if shaking (by hand, or motion when ...
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1answer
28 views

How is the efficiency of an electric motor affected? [closed]

Consider that I'm having a motor (AC/DC) and the power switch is on and it's being supplied power and of course the motor is rotating. Now, I continuously start switching off and on the power. For 1 ...
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52 views

What is the rigorous definition for current in a closed circuit?

I know that $I = \frac {dq} {dt}$, but I have trouble reconciling that derivative definition with my intuitive understanding of current. At an arbitrary point in wire, the current is obviously the ...
3
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1answer
108 views

does a resistor slow down the flow of electrons or just let less electrons through? or is it both?

I like to have an intuitive grasp of whats happening our tutor said they 'resist' the flow of electrons but I want to understand exactly whats happening.
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1answer
66 views

Filament lamp: Negative part of I/V characteristic?

I don't understand the negative part of the graph. It shows that the resistance is decreasing as the voltage goes from negative towards 0. What does a negative voltage mean and why does the graph ...
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1answer
45 views

Can Ampere's Circuital law be used on an infinite number of alternating Helmholtz coils?

I have the following surface current density $$ \bar{\sigma}_s = \hat{\phi} \sin(kz) |\bar{\sigma}_s| $$ to approximate an infinite number of alternating Helmholtz coils stacked along the z-axis with ...
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1answer
40 views

What would you do to measure wind speed below 50m?

Is there a radiation spectrum that could be used near the surface of the earth to fluoresce air enough to see the currents? Is there a complimentary CCD that can image that spectrum? I am looking for ...
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1answer
297 views

What would be the resistance of a wire, if it is stretched to double length? [closed]

If there is a wire of resistance $R$ and we stretch it such that it becomes 2 times longer, then what should be the new resistance of the wire?
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36 views

Current in discharging capacitor through fixed resistor?

In the textbook I'm using for physics it says that the charge left on the plates of a capacitor after time $t$, that is discharging through a fixed resistor, is $Q=Q_0e^{-t/\tau}$ where $\tau=RC$ is ...
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2answers
112 views

How to use Ampere's Law for a semi-infinite wire with current?

Suppose that there is a semi-infinite wire which extends to infinity only in one direction. There are no other circuit elements at the other end(finite end) of the wire and the current does not loop. ...
3
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1answer
114 views

Why is the quench temperature fluctuation not a concern for maglev trains?

I am having trouble discovering why temperature fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations are not a stability concern for superconducting magnetic levitation trains. I am under the impression that ...
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124 views

Earth magnetic field [closed]

I gather that, in these days, the most common explanation for the Earth magnetic field existence and strength is the theory of convetive currents of molten iron and nickel atoms in the outer core of ...
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31 views

Do these symmetrical looking B field problems have the obvious answer?

I am struggling with two questions whose answers both appear to be trivially zero by symmetry arguments, when I was expecting more derivation to be required. Problem A), An infinitely long wire ...
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1answer
41 views

Interacting magnetic fields

Is there a reason why two magnetic fields perpendicular to each other do not interact? If they are parallel or at a non-90 degree angle they interact. Is it because magnetic field lines can be viwed ...
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25 views

Non-abelian current transformation

This is my firs post ever here and I just registered on this site but I want to say that this site has helped me a lot and you guys are great! On to the question: I have the equation of motion that ...
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1answer
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Cryptic remark in physics revision guide

I am currently revising for my AP physics and I couldn't understand one of the end-of-section summary notes. It says: "Remember that the direction of magnetic field is from North to South, and that ...