A fundamental and empirical law quantifying the electrostatic force between two charges.

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What is Coulumb force at zero separation in classical picture [on hold]

Assume a classical world. What would be force between 2 point charges if their separation tends to zero? Assume charges are static. My professor claimed it would be finite. I request you to ...
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395 views

Modified Coulomb potential [on hold]

I'm working through Byron and Fuller's "Mathematics of Classical and Quantum Physics" and came across this problem: If the electric potential of a point charge were $\phi(r) = \frac{q}{r^{1-\...
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1answer
169 views

Problem from Purcell and Morin's Electricity and Magnetism: Holding the charge in place

This is the problem given in Purcell and Morin's electricity and magnetism book. (Problem 3.2 If you have the book) Figure: I was able to figure out that the charges on A,B,C,D cant be held ...
8
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1answer
292 views

Why doesn't an electron's charge rip the electron apart? [duplicate]

Like charges repel. What keeps an electron's charge from repelling itself? This problem would come up if an electron was divisible and its parts had fractional charge. A related question is, ...
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3answers
8k views

Protons' repulsion within a nucleus

Do the protons inside the nucleus repel each other by the electrostatic force? If they do, why doesn't the repulsion drive the protons apart so that the nuclei get disintegrated?
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What makes a nucleus unstable?

My question is simply that - what makes a nucleus unstable? What exactly causes a nucleus to start breaking apart in the first place? Is it the Coulomb force between the neighboring protons? I'm just ...
1
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1answer
38 views

Why don't the nucleus break apart? [duplicate]

The nucleus of an atom is made up of protons and neutrons. So if there are many protons inside nucleus even though there are neutrons why don't this protons may repel away breaking nucleus apart? The ...
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51 views

How do non-contact forces work?

One question has been bugging me ever since I started learning physics, the textbooks successfully describe the empirical observations but haven't given any reasoning behind it. What I want to ...
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123 views

What does the Dirac delta function physically do while deriving Gauss Law form Coulomb's law?

While doing this derivation, the the source coordinates are mentioned as "$s$" and the coordinate of the point at which field is to be calculated is mentioned as "$r$". Kindly follow this Wikipedia ...
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1answer
398 views

Electrostatics-Coulomb's Law

Coulomb's Law is an experimental result. The furmula that Coulomb found to describe electrostatic interactions is: $$F=k_e\frac{q_1 q_2}{d^2}.$$ How did or What did Coulomb do to verify this law as ...
4
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4answers
203 views

Electric field dependence on distance

How can it be proved that for a point charge, $E$ is proportional to $$1/r^2$$ using the concept of Electric field lines (or lines of force)? I tried to show that if field lines are close, then ...
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1answer
56 views

Thus, what mediates the electric interaction between two electrons? [duplicate]

We are all learning since kindergarten that the electric interaction is mediated by photons. then you learn this photons are not real, there are real photons, true, but these do not mediate the ...
2
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1answer
129 views

What is the significance of the Inverse-square law? [duplicate]

Considering its occurrences in various fields like Electrostatics, Gravitation, Acoustics etc. how does the law bind these topics together?
14
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2answers
865 views

Why is there no permittivity-type constant for gravitation?

When I look at electric or magnetic fields, each of them has a constant that defines how a field affects or is affected by a medium. For example, electric fields in vacuum have a permittivity constant ...
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1answer
65 views

Electric flux of a charged rod through a uniform disc

I have an assignment regarding electric flux. The question I was given has the following sketch: The first question was about the force on the rod from the disc at the $z$-axis. I reached the ...
0
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0answers
40 views

Time of free fall in a repulsive force [duplicate]

The formula for time of a free falling body when acceleration is not constant can be found in any answers here at this site and also at wikipedia. But I haven't been able to find any formula for a ...
8
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4answers
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Why does an electron shell further away from nucleus has higher energy level?

Using electrical potential energy $V=\frac{1}{4\pi \varepsilon_0} \frac{Q_1 Q_2}{r}$ , a particle further away from nucleus has lower magnitude of energy. Using Coulomb's law, a particle further away ...
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3answers
127 views

How does the Electric Field create a force? [closed]

If we have 2 charged particles which are a certain distance away from each other, they either attract of repel due to the electric field created by both of them. But I don't understand the mechanism ...
3
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2answers
410 views

Schrödinger equation for many body systems

$$H_{tot}=\sum \dfrac{p_i^2}{2m}+\sum\dfrac{p_I^2}{2M_I}+\sum V_{nucl}(r_i)+\dfrac{1}{2}\sum_{i\ne j} \dfrac{e^2}{|r_i-r_j|}+\dfrac{1}{2}\sum_{I\ne J}\dfrac{z_Iz_Je^2}{|R_I-R_J|} $$ with: $$V_{nuc}...
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Is the electric field of a volume charge distribution well defined?

Consider a volume charge distribution $\rho({\bf r'})$. The electric field at ${\bf r}$ is $${\bf E}({\bf r})=\iiint\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}\frac{\rho({\bf r'})}{R^2}\hat{\bf R}\, \mathrm d^3{\bf r'}$...
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Which is the form of Born-Mayer repulsion term?

I have found in many textbooks different and unclear form of the Born-Mayer repulsion term. I write the interatomic potential as $V(r)= -\frac{e^2}{r}+V_{BM}$ and for $V_{BM}$ I expected something ...
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Notation of a vector containing equation in a paper

I'm trying to implement Coulomb long range interactions into a molecular simulation program using a particle-particle/particle-mesh Ewald solver. The following equation from the paper "How to mesh up ...
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1answer
55 views

When two like charges are placed at a large distance from each other, do they attract each other? [closed]

So my friend and I were arguing about this. He insists that if two like charges are placed at a large distance from each other, they attract each other. I find this nonsense. This clearly violates ...
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Speed of the Coulomb Field Measured To Be “Infinite”

The paper "Measuring Propagation Speed of Coulomb Fields" by R. de Sangro et al points out that: ...the Lienard-Weichert retarded potential leads to the same formula as the one obtained assuming ...
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1answer
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While deriving Coulomb's Law from Gauss' Law, the power of 'r' comes out to be exactly 2 while experiment shows that it differs about 10^(-16). Why?

While deriving Coulomb's Law from Gauss' Law, the power of 'r' comes out to be exactly 2 while experiment shows that it differs about 10^(-16). Why is it so? I'm referring to the book 'Physics by ...
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48 views

Coulomb's law and its application [closed]

I just read that Coulomb*s Law describes (a) the forces that bind atoms together to form molecules (b) the forces that bind molecules together to form solids. My question is Do a proton share ...
3
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2answers
227 views

Why according to Hund's first rule all electron with same spin should occupy orbitals when partially filling?

I get that because of coulomb repulsion initially all the electrons will not occupy the same site but will single occupy the orbitals.But while doing so how do they know to keep their spins aligned ...
3
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4answers
557 views

Attractive force between capacitor plates

A textbook question requires me to calculate the force of attraction between plates of a parallel-plate capacitor. The answer provided is $\frac{1}{2}QE$. I am not entirely sure how they arrived at ...
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0answers
69 views

Why is there no negative mass? [duplicate]

We know that the entire matter has a property called mass. Charge is also a property of matter. If negative charge can exist, why don't negative mass exist? Also, like charges repel each other. Then ...
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3answers
88 views

What is the maximum reach distance of electric field? [duplicate]

if i charge small object by removing electrons and put that object in the middle of huge vacuum chamber (million of light years in size) does the electric field lines of that charged object still be ...
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Coulomb's law and electric field intensity [closed]

here is question and solution I can't understand why R_x= 4a_z please explain it detail! ;-(
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Are Coulomb's Law and Lorentz force always true for all phenomenon in physics?

I saw two equation about charge: Coulomb's law $$\mathbf F=k \frac{q_1q_2}{ r_{12}^{2} }\, \mathbf{\hat r} $$ and magnetic Force $$ \mathbf F=q \, \mathbf v\times \mathbf B$$ My question is:...
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Electrostatics Of Conductors

My textbook says that no excess charge can reside inside the conductor because electric field inside a conductor is 0. But say i introduce a positive charge inside a conductor, it generates its own ...
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48 views

Exchange of virtual photons [duplicate]

How does the exchange of virtual photons as per QED explain the electrostatic attraction of particles of opposite charge?
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1answer
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Applicability of coulombs law for objects in different dielectric media

Is the Coulombs law applicable for inter-medium interaction? Consider the example image shown below How can one deduce the angles the bobs might make if they are in different dielectric medium?...
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What does the $k_e$ in Coulomb's law and $G$ in Newton's Universal Gravitation Law mean?

I very well understand the proportionality relation that was used to derive these laws like $F$ is proportional to product of masses and inversely to radius squared and hence its proportional to the ...
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1answer
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Which was the first Coulomb's constant value? [closed]

Which was the first Coulomb's constant value? I didn't found any info in the Internet. I need the first value of K to compare it with my experiment. Could you please help me?
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1answer
54 views

Is there an underlying reason why some forces are inversely proportional to the square of the distance? [duplicate]

This is the first time I'm studying those subjects (I'm still in high school) and my teacher couldn't give me an answer. I'm referring specially to Newton's law of gravitation and Coulomb's law of ...
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1answer
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Coulomb collision

I was reading an article by N. Bohr and came upon the following problem (the following wording is actually taken from a book by Thompson - Conduction of Electricity Through Gases): Let $M_1, M_2$ ...
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36 views

Why is there a potential well near a hydrogen nucleus?

A hydrogen nucleus consists of a proton and the electric potential is given by the formula KQ/r where Q is +1.6×10^-19. So plotting a function of electric potential with distance r should give a ...
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5answers
93 views

Solving for $r=0$ in an inverse square law

This occurred to me in thinking about Coulomb's Law for a spherical insulator, but obviously can be asked of any inverse square law force calculation. For example, all things on the surface of he ...
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2answers
142 views

How much is a Coulomb, really?

I've heard it said in my physics class that a Coulomb "is a lot of charge". And I believe it; most of the problems I've done in the class so far involve charges on the order of micro-Coulombs (or, ...
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2answers
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Graph for Coulomb force vs $1/r^2$

We know that when there is a relation like x inversely proportional to y^2, the graph would be like this: But in this question"Plot a graph showing variation of Coulomb force(F) versus $1/r^2$, ...
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1answer
64 views

Positions where the electric field is not defined

Can anybody help me to understand this statement given in my book? The electric field due to a discrete charge configuration is not defined at the locations of the discrete charges. For ...
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1answer
94 views

Four equally charged electrons are placed at the corners of a square. What charge should be placed in the center to keep them in place? [closed]

Here is a drawing: http://imgur.com/VdW1Xmv Trying to solve this question. I understand that the charge in the center needs to be positive, and the sum of all forces should be 0. But how do I ...