A fundamental and empirical law quantifying the electrostatic force between two charges.

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1answer
179 views

Find the field of two infinite strips of width $b$ [closed]

Q:The two charged strips in the following picture have width $b$, infinite height,and negligible thickness(in the direction perpendicular to the page).Their densities per unit area are $\sigma$ ...
0
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1answer
730 views

Why does electron move closer to the nucleus when it emits light and not vice-versa?

The book tells me that electrons move more close to the nucleus when emission occurs and it moves far away from the nucleus when absorption occurs: why it's not vice-vers? As I understand, the ...
2
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2answers
193 views

Electric force between charges in two different media

As far as I know, Coulomb's law of electrostatic force is applicable on two different charges situated in same medium. But if two individual charges are in different media (say one charge on a iron ...
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1answer
1k views

Coulombs law: calculate force exerted on one charge by the other two [closed]

The drawing shows three point charges fixed in place. The charge at the coordinate origin has a value of q1 = +8.00 μC; the other two charges have identical magnitudes, but opposite signs: q2 = ...
4
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2answers
157 views

Instantaneous Coulomb interaction in QED

It seems I am stuck with a (at a first sight) trivial problem. It's from the "Quarks and Leptons" (Halzen, Martin) book page $141$, where one considers the following integral: $$\tag{1} T_{fi} = ...
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1answer
161 views

Electrostatics Equilibrium problem [closed]

What should be the value of Q? I am doing the basics of coulomb's law,can anyone explain this to me?
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2answers
780 views

How can I split a resultant force into its $x$ and $y$ components?

Point charge 3.5μC is located at x = 0, y = 0.30 m, point charge -3.5μC is located at x = 0 y = -0.30 m. What are (a)the magnitude and (b)direction of the total electric force that these charges ...
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263 views

Coulomb's Law- Why the Coulomb's law is valid only for point and static charges?

Why the coulomb's law is valid only for point and static charges? Is there is any definite reason?
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29 views

Coulomb Exhaustion

In thinking about a perturbation model for Coulomb's law, one could imagine photons spewing off of a charge in all directions. The chance of interaction with a near by charge being proportional to ...
1
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1answer
194 views

How to find the electric field of a charged tube?

Let's say there is a charged tube(cylinder with no top or bottom) with radius $a$, length $l$ and charge $q$ and a point which is collinear with the centre of the charged tube. Anyway, since we can ...
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0answers
239 views

How to calculate the electrostatic force between two dielectric rings of charge?

Let's say there is a dielectric ring of charge with radius $a$ and charge $q_1$. I could calculate the electrostatic force applied on a point charge with charge $q_2$ and which is collinear with the ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

What would happen if charged plates are placed horizontally?

My idea is placing charged conducting plates in such a way that they won't see each others' surfaces unlikely to the typical design of parallel plates. If they are placed like this, would be the force ...
1
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1answer
145 views

How to calculate the force between line of charges?

As far as I know Coulomb's law only works for point charges but what if there are not any point charges? For example, let's imagine there are three rectangles with different sizes. First one is 50 cm, ...
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2answers
44 views

Effect of variable permittivity

If I immerse a rod vertically in a liquid with a relative permittivity gradient (the permittivity decreases with depth), will the rod stretch (will the spacing of the atoms in the rod be affected by ...
3
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1answer
162 views

The Physics Behind Chemical Bonding

Ok so here's the problem: say I'm a sodium atom. It is 'charged' at +1e. A partner Chlorine atom is flying about, also 'charged' at -1e. According to chemistry (or rather the measurement of the ...
2
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1answer
70 views

Why do we take the value of the constant in Coulomb's law as $\frac{1}{4\pi\varepsilon_0}$? [duplicate]

Why do we take the value of the constant in Coulomb's law as $\frac{1}{4\pi\varepsilon_0}$?
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6answers
1k views

What is the range of the validity of Coulomb's law?

What is the smallest and biggest distance in which Coulomb's law is valid? Please provide a reference to a scientific journal or book. Just saying that this law is valid from this range to that range ...
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0answers
15 views

Is there a simulator for observing the force between two charges comprehensively? [duplicate]

I basically want to observe the electrostatic force between two charges. I want to know if is there a simulator which could both help me to observe and calculate the force between two charges. I ...
0
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0answers
28 views

Is there a simulator for observing the force between two charges?

I basically want to observe the electrostatic force between two charges. I want to know if is there a simulator which could both help me to observe and calculate the force between two charges. I ...
6
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4answers
931 views

Is Coulomb's law accurate for moving charges?

Can we use Coulomb's law to calculate the force between two charges which are not at rest? If not, what formula should be used to calculate the force? I searched it, but I couldn't find a clear ...
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0answers
283 views

Why does Coulomb's law not hold for fast moving charges?

We all remember calculating the electric force of interaction between a stationary nucleus and a revolving electron using Coulomb's law. The electron in this case is moving. Here's what I think about ...
7
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1answer
284 views

Classical vs. quantum energy of the hydrogen atom

If I have an electron and a proton and calculate the classical energy which I get by bringing the electron from infinity to the distance of a Bohr radius to the proton, I get 27.2 eV, but the electron ...
2
votes
2answers
374 views

Electrostatics - Inserting a brass plate between two charges

The question is: if I were to insert a brass plate between two charges, what will happen to the force between the charges? Would it increase, decrease or stay the same? Does the brass plate increase ...
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2answers
262 views

The fundamental equations of electromagnetism

I'd like to know what are the basic equations of electromagnetism, that can be used to formulate all the other laws and equations. Those basic equations I can think of are Maxwell equations, Lorentz ...
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2answers
583 views

Is it possible to calculate the force exerted by two unequal charge, separately?

According to the Coulomb's law, when two equal like point charges are placed 1m from each other the force between them is 9 * 109. But if two unequal like point charges are placed, the bigger charge ...
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0answers
233 views

Infinite chain of alternating charge

The problem There is an infinite chain (1d) of alternating charges that are in a distance a from each other. That is there is one charge +q and next to it -q and so on. Now calculate how much work it ...
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79 views

Could Charles-Augustin de Coulomb measure the charge in Coulombs?

Did Charles-Augustin de Coulomb know: Coulomb's constant Coulomb (as a unit) if not then what was the first time it was measured?
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2answers
110 views

How is $\text{PE} = qV$ derived using knowledge of $F = \frac{q_1q_2}{4\pi \epsilon_0 r^2}$

I recently started grade 11, and this concept confuses me, since if we place a charge $q$ on a potential $V$, I do not completely comprehend what values would need to be substituted which would give ...
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0answers
39 views

Dependence of Force as a function of Distance? [duplicate]

Why is the strength of a field (i.e. gravitational or electric) inversely correlated to the square of the radius? It is clear to me why the further you get a way from a field, the field's enacted ...
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0answers
43 views

Electric Field: distributed uniformly in one infinity tape of length [closed]

One charge density surface is distributed uniformly in one infinity tape of length with $2a$ width from distance $d$. Determine the Electric Field in the point perpendicular from the distance $d$ ...
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1answer
38 views

Does higher voltage and plate area cause more separation between leaves in electroscope?

Does higher voltage cause more separation between leaves in electroscope? Will higher voltage and plate area attract more charge since Q = CV.
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2answers
387 views

Electrostatics kinematics equations (Coulombs Law)

If there are two similarly charged particles $Q$ and $q$ of masses $M$ and $m$, a Coulomb force is applied on each one (action-reaction). Suppose that $Q$ is stationary and we are shooting $q$ with an ...
0
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1answer
247 views

Electrostatics-Coulomb's Law

Coulomb's Law is an experimental result $$F=k_e\frac{q_1 q_2}{d}.$$ How did or What did Coulomb do to verify this law as it is applicable for point charges at rest and in reality charges won't be at ...
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0answers
42 views

How to prove Gauss's law div(E) = rho/epsilon from Coulomb's law? [duplicate]

As we know from coulomb's law that: $$\vec{E} = \frac{q}{4\pi\epsilon R^2} \hat{R}$$ using the above equation, how can I verify that: $$\vec{\nabla}\cdot \vec{E}=\frac{q}{\epsilon}$$ I have tried to ...
4
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2answers
258 views

Why can you make two repelling positively charged rods touch? Shouldn't the Coulomb force become infinite?

For a physics lab on the Triboelectric effect, we rubbed two rods with fur which gave both of them a positive charge. We then brought them close together, and they obviously repelled. We then held ...
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1answer
212 views

Maxwells' equations and Coulomb's law

Coulomb's law and Maxwell's equations should be consistant as one can be derived from the other. Say we have a point charge with such a charge that $-kq=1$, meaning that at any point the electric ...
2
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1answer
171 views

Why Gauss' law is applied?

Why Gauss' law is applied? Why is there a need of finding electric field by Gauss' law if we can find the electric field through Coulomb's law? or has it got more applications than Coulomb's law?
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2answers
164 views

Relation between Gauss' law and Coulomb's law

In Coulomb's law if the relation was as if electric field intensity was to vary inversely $1/r$ with distance rather than the inverse $1/r^2$ of square of distance, would the Gauss's law still be ...
0
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1answer
129 views

Need for acceleration in particle-antiparticle annihilation? [closed]

If an electron and positron are accelerated towards each other, at distances quite far away, there wouldn't be any significant electrostatic attraction, hence they need to be accelerated. But when ...
0
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2answers
110 views

Who first verified Coulomb's Law for electron+proton interaction?

Who first verified Coulomb's Law for the interaction of a proton and electron? Was it Rutherford? Bohr?
0
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1answer
77 views

Reduced charge for attracting electrons?

The reduced mass in the two body problem is $\mu= \cfrac{m_1 m_2}{m_1 + m_2}$. Is there any analog to this with interacting charged particles (or at least that is of use somewhere in physics)? I have ...
13
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2answers
546 views

Why is there no permittivity-type constant for gravitation?

When I look at electric or magnetic fields, each of them has a constant that defines how a field affects or is affected by a medium. For example, electric fields in vacuum have a permittivity constant ...
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3answers
1k views

2 dimensional Coulomb's law equation

We can notice that in the Coulomb's law equation, $$\begin{equation}\tag{1}F=\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon}\cdot\frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}\end{equation} $$ $4\pi r^2$ factor in the denominator expresses directly ...
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4answers
21k views

Why do same/opposite electric charges repel/attract each other, respectively?

I know plus pushes another plus away, but why, really, do they do that? On the other hand, molecules of the same type are attracted to each other. I find that weird. I do know some stuff about four ...
2
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2answers
216 views

My conundrum with Gauss’ law in electrostatics

If I use Gauss’ law to calculate the electric field outside of a charged (conducting or insulating) sphere or a point charge, the fields are the same. However, as a test approaches a point charge, the ...
4
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1answer
351 views

Coulomb interaction as virtual particles exchange?

I've been reading about virtual particle exchanges in physics books and in Physics SA posts, where a particle interpretation of gravity and Coulomb interaction is established. The Feynman Diagram ...
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3answers
603 views

How would charge be distributed in charged conductors if the Coulomb law was not ${1}/{r^2}$?

Would the excess charge on a conductor move to surface until the electric field inside become zero if the Coulomb law was for example $\frac{1}{r^3}$? If yes, would the distribution $\sigma(x,y)$ be ...
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0answers
40 views

How to derive the classical Hartree potential for a slab system?

I am now working on a slab system, but encountered some problems on the classical Hartree potential. This slab system is infinity along x-y plane, and has finite size along $z$ axis $z\in[0,L]$. I ...
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1answer
298 views

Coulomb force on the center of a hexagon?

Six point charges $q$ are at the corners of a regular hexagon that has sides of length $a$. What is the force on another charge $Q$ which is located in the center of the hexagon? What is the force on ...
3
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1answer
367 views

Information content of the electrostatic Maxwell equations vs Coulomb's Law vs Poisson's Equation

In electrostatics, we have Maxwell's equations: $\nabla \cdot E = \rho$ $\nabla \times E = 0$ These four equations (the second line standing for three equations) can also be written in terms of the ...