A fundamental and empirical law quantifying the electrostatic force between two charges.

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Electrons in graphene will behave as in 2D space?

Will electrons in graphene behave as in pure 2D space, that is they interact with eachother by a Coulomb potential ~ $\ln r$ instead of $1/r$? I think many force lines will "leak" out of graphene ...
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53 views

An Electron Chasing Another

An electron is held in place in deep space. Another electron approaches with speed $v_0$. When the approaching electron is a distance $r_0$ away from the first electron, the first is set free. The ...
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Nucleus validation [duplicate]

Inside the nucleus of an atom is the Coulomb's law valid? I mean that between proton, neutron and other elementary particles, i.e., meson etc. What will be the limit or validity of charges between ...
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1answer
62 views

Coulomb's law with an $r^3$, not $r^2$, in the denominator [duplicate]

I am reading an older physics book that my professor gave me. It is going over Coulomb's law and Gauss' theorem. However, the book gives both equations with an $r^3$, not $r^2$, in the denominator. ...
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3answers
67 views

Is the electric field at a single point inside a charged sphere zero?

Many physics textbooks say, Gauss' law shows that the electric field inside a sphere with uniform charge distribution on the surface equals zero. What I want to know is, do they mean total, ...
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53 views

Force Acting on a Charge Between Parallel Plates

When a charge (say positive) is placed between an upper positively charged plate and a negatively charged plate, it should experience a repulsive force from the top plate and an attractive force to ...
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1k views

Do electrostatic fields really obey “action at a distance”?

In an electromagnetic theory class, my professor introduced the concept of "action at a distance in physics". He said that: If two charges are at some very large distance, and if any one of the ...
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49 views

Importance sampling for Coulomb potential

The integral I have to solve is: $$I=\int\int d \mathbf{r}d \mathbf{r}' \frac{\Phi(\mathbf{r})\Phi(\mathbf{r}')}{|\mathbf{r}-\mathbf{r}'|}$$ It is a six-dimensional integral which I am going to ...
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27 views

coulomb collision

I was reading an article by N. Bohr and came upon the following problem (the following wording is actually taken from a book by Thompson - Conduction of Electricity Through Gases): Let $M_1, M_2$ ...
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1answer
51 views

What is colour-Coulomb interaction?

In several publications (e.g. http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06864) a "colour Coulomb interaction" between quarks was mentioned. What kind of interaction is that, is it electromagnetic or strong?
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27 views

Collision between electrons & nucleus [duplicate]

I am new with physics and I have a confusion that since electron and nucleus has opposite charges then why they do not collide with each other inside an atom?
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35 views

Interaction Energy vs Force

I'm having a hard time determining the relationship/differences between interaction energy and forces. Say we have a system of two charged particles. Each particle will exert a force on each other ...
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52 views

What does multiplying of charges means?

Today I learned Coulomb's law, and I didn't get what does this multiplication $q_1 * q_2$ gives? I want to understand this visually.
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1answer
30 views

What is the purpose of defining an electric field, and how to apply it?

So, I've been reading an introductory book to physics. I've gotten to the point where I understand Coulomb's law, and now the book is introducing electric fields. I'm having a hard time ...
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56 views

Sphere of electric charge revisited

I am thinking about a sphere of homogeneous charge distribution (see Electric field due to a solid sphere of charge, for example). Here we use a Gaussian surface (blue area) to find the electric ...
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2answers
203 views

Application of Coulomb's Law

I've just finished reading a section in a book on Coulomb's Law. I'm trying to practice the math a bit and came up with the following: Suppose you have two charges, -5uC ($q_1$) and 7nC ($q_2$). ...
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2answers
108 views

An infinite value for an electric field?

Consider a system of point charges. To calculate the value of an electric field at a point, we consider the contribution of the electric field from all the charges at that point. Consider the ...
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1answer
149 views

Deriving Coulomb's law from quantum electrodynamics [duplicate]

Is it possible to derive the Coulomb's law using the principles of quantum electrodynamics? How?
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1answer
24 views

where does the term half in the formula of electrostatic potential energy comes from?(system of point charges)

Electrostatic potential energy stored in a system of point charges (from wikipedia) The electrostatic potential energy $U_E$ stored in a system of N charges q1, q2, ..., qN at positions r1, r2, ...
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2answers
55 views

a question about work needed to move a charge towards another one [duplicate]

Consider two charges $q_1>0$ & $q_2>0$ separated by a distance $d_1$, and we want to move charge $q_2$ to a distance $d_2$ from $d_1$ where $d_1-d_2>0$. I need to calculate the work ...
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58 views

simple force question

So given this diagram, I was supposed to find the magnitude and direction of the net force on the -10nC charge on the bottom right corner. I found the magnitude by myself using Coulomb's law for the ...
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2answers
39 views

What is the intuitive meaning behind Coulomb's constant $k_e$?

What is the intuitive meaning behind Coulomb's constant $k_e$? If the force of an electric field can be calculated by $$F=k_eqQ/d^2$$ If I could guess I would say $k_e$ is the acceleration but I am ...
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1answer
28 views

Understanding the differences and applications of some electrical equations

In preparing for the AP Physics 2 test tomorrow, (the first year this test is being offered, so this material is not easily searchable), I've been doing some reviewing of the equation sheet and trying ...
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1answer
76 views

dipole field on axis twice the field on perpendicular bisector

Why is the dipole field on axis twice the field on perpendicular bisector? For the perpendicular bisector: Lets assume -q is right from of the origin and +q is left from the origin, both a distance a ...
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1answer
242 views

Graph of electric potential

In my AP physics guide the graph for electric potential (for a radial field, i.e. point charge) and gravitational potential (for radial field, i.e. point mass) slightly differ from each other and I ...
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1answer
97 views

Is there a fundamental relationship between Coulomb's law and Newton's Law of Gravitation? [duplicate]

It seems like the two equations are identical indicates that there is something more going on that unites them both, maybe in a cool way or something. Why are these two laws so similar?
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75 views

Why do inverse square forces not rise asymptotically for $r\to 0$?

An example of an inverse square force is the gravitational force: $$ F = \dfrac{G m_1 m_2}{r^2}$$ For large bodies I can understand why the force does not rise asymptotically as you get closer. For ...
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85 views

Induction in Electrostatics

While solving some problems on electrostatics, I came across this question : Two balls carrying charges of +3 $\mu C$ and -3$\mu C$ attract each other with a force $F$. If a charge of +3$\mu C$ is ...
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3answers
63 views

Lower limit value of electric force [closed]

What is the lower limit value to the electric force between two charges separated by a fixed distance?
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0answers
30 views

Infinite force between two point charges as $r$ approaches 0 [duplicate]

According to coulombs law the Force experienced by two point charges increases with the inverse square of their separation. This would imply that at distances approaching 0, the Force approaches ...
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2answers
99 views

Force when distance between charge is zero

According to coulomb law $$ F = \frac{q_1q_2}{r^2} $$ I want to know what happens to force when $r=0$. If $F \to \infty$ then the charges can't be separated! But if an unlike charge of higher ...
2
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1answer
58 views

Special relativity, electromagnetic fields, charge and Q

Is it true, were Coulomb's constant k to be several orders of magnitude smaller, that there would be no (or increasingly negligible) magnetic fields generated by moving charges? The reason being the ...
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2answers
194 views

Direction of electric field lines and electrostatic force

Direction of electric field and electrostatic force should be same by the equation $$\vec{F} = \frac{k q q_0}{r^2}$$ Electric Field $$\vec{E} = \frac{k q}{r^2}$$ Let us suppose that there is a ...
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1answer
38 views

Why does the medium affect the Coulomb's constant but not the gravitational constant?

Why does the medium affect the Coulomb's constant but not the gravitational constant? My friend said maybe the particles of the medium affect the electric field. But the net charge in the medium is 0 ...
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75 views

Electron Beam Welding equation

I am studying for a nuclear physics course right now and came across a question and topic that sparked my interest - Electron Beam Welding. As I understand it, the process heats up the metal by ...
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2answers
203 views

Will the electrostatic force between two charges change if we place a metal plate between them?

If a thin metal plate is placed between two charges $+q$ and $+q$, will this cause a change in the electrostatic force acting on one charge due to another? What is the concept behind this? What will ...
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2answers
111 views

Does the electric force on a charged particle in a uniform electric field increase?

If I have a proton in a uniform field between two parallel oppositely charged plates and the proton accelerates, the electric force acting on it stays constant seeing it is a uniform field and as a ...
3
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2answers
161 views

Why is the voltage of a battery equal to the emf?

We know that there is an electric field inside the battery that works against the moving electrons of a circuit. But there is also the chemical force of the battery that at some point become equal. ...
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1answer
214 views

Gauss Law for a Modified Coulomb's Law

A problem out of a certain popular book on electricity and magnetism dealt with the resulting electrostatic theory if Coulomb's law was replaced with the following equation: $$ \mathbf{F} = ...
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307 views

Coulomb's law and Gauss' Law

Which of these laws is more fundamental or forms the basis of electrostatics? I started off with Coulomb's law and then I studied Gauss' law. I was wondering which one is more universal? My professor ...
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1answer
101 views

How did special relativity change physicists views on the two prominent inverse square laws (ie Newton grav and Coulomb's law)?

On page 107 in Hartle's Gravity -- An introduction to Einstein's General Relativity, he says the following With the success of special relativity it became apparent that the Newtonian theory of ...
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1answer
84 views

How do photons mediate (or create) a force?

Is there a somewhat intuitive explanation as to why the exchange of a photon between two particles causes a force between those particles? Is there a difference in the way massless and massive ...
0
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1answer
40 views

What's the Relation between Potential of mechanics and electricity?

As we know that for a conservative force field, there is associated a Potential with the force. But we know there is a potential in electricity (That's voltage). My question is that is there any ...
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2answers
154 views

Origin of the Lorentz force from the point view of relativity?

I'm a physicist, when I'm working on the quantum spin hall effect, I recollected the high-school knowledge on Lorentz force and try to explain the origin of it, but didn't get it in the first glance. ...
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19 views

My electrophorus doesn't work

I have failed in generating charge using electrophorus. The charging material was a balloon rubbed with hair until it became very full of static, as well as a small piece of Styrofoam rubbed with the ...
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1answer
346 views

Rigorous proof of Gauss' law for an arbitrary charge distribution from Coulomb's law

Most of the books about electromagnetism prove Gauss' law for a point charge in vacuum: $$ \Phi = \int_{\Sigma} \mathbf{E} \centerdot d \mathbf{S} = q/\epsilon_0 $$ and then simply state that for ...
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1answer
64 views

Repulsive force between same charged plates?

I understand that the attraction force between parallel plates of capacitor is the derivative of stored energy with respect to distance of the plates. But how could we find the repulsive force between ...
2
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1answer
120 views

Gauss's Law of Electric Field how it actually works? & How Gauss derived it?

I want to know how Gauss derived his equation of Electric Field. Did he derive it from Coulomb's law? I don't think so. Please tell me some details about how this law works? inside a Gaussian ...
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Galilean and Lorentz Covariance in Julian Schwinger's book Electrodynamics

In the book Electrodynamics (pp. 8-11) Julian Schwinger "derives" (in this special case) the complete Maxwell equations from the Coulomb potential using only the Galilean transformation $$ ...
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1answer
121 views

Is it equivalent to derive Gauss's law from discrete and continuous source distributions?

I've seen two derivations for Gauss's law in electrostatics. The first assumes a discrete charge distribution, the second a continuous one: Use superposition $$\vec{E}=\sum_{i=1}^n\vec{E}_i,$$ so ...