The study of the large-scale structure, history, and future of the universe. Cosmology is about asking and answering questions about the "big picture" - the extent, origin, and fate of everything we know.

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Can a Dyson Sphere around a Black Hole be built so that it would not radiate significant IR?

This is related to this question If the sphere surrounded a BH and used it as a heat dump (as well as extracting energy from it by dropping in mass) could its exterior be engineered to match the ...
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1answer
50 views

What $f(R)$ models pass most of the known constraints?

In most papers and talks about $f(R)$ gravity authors repeatedly state that the model proposed by Starobinsky 2007 $$ f(R)=R+\lambda\,R_{0} \bigg[\bigg(1+\frac{R^{2}}{R_{0}^{2}}\bigg)^{-n}-1\bigg] ...
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45 views

Does Only Flat universe have zero energy? [on hold]

Hello I am very new to cosmology and quantum physics. I need some basic understanding (in LAYMANs term )of the following: I read that only closed universe has zero energy. But I heard Astrophysicist ...
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177 views

Does the radius of the Universe correspond to its total entropy?

I heard a claim that due to holographic principle, the surface area of the cosmic horizon corresponds to the universe's total entropy. As such the initial state had zero surface area and later ...
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1answer
135 views

Spiral galaxies and gravity lenses

Spiral Galaxies must have a great deal more mass than elliptical galaxies of the same size in order to account for the flat velocity curve. I've seen references of eight to ten times the visible ...
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70 views

Why do we form cosmological theories based on old data?

Since the light we receive from distant galaxies may be between 7 and 14 billion light years away, the redshift we see indicates that the universe was expanding at that time (7 to 14 billion years ...
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1answer
36 views

Current constraints on lightest neutrino mass?

This paper from 2005 claims that the mass of the lightest neutrino is unconstrained. (see p9) Oscillations are only able to constrain the differences in squares as far as I know, but perhaps ...
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1answer
119 views

Speed of light and current dimensions of the universe [duplicate]

I've seen several documentaries explaining that the diameter of the universe is currently estimated at over 90 billion light-years. And which that - in the face of the age of the universe being about ...
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1answer
42 views

Distance between two galaxies of different redshift

Let $Q_1$ and $Q_2$ two different objects in the Universe (we can think to two galaxies or quasars), that we observe from the Earth at different angular position $(\alpha_1,\delta_1)$, ...
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387 views

Creation of a miniature universe?

I am not referring to the experiment being conducted at Lancaster University involving liquid helium and a magnetic field to build a marble sized representation of the early cosmos. My question is: ...
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2answers
73 views

Special and general relativity and space time

I have a question. I'm reading The Elegant Universe and it's talking about the special and general theory of relativity. One of the things it mentions is that time and the three dimensions of space ...
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0answers
33 views

Is the scale factor Lorentz invariant?

Given that the Minkowski metric does not change under a Lorentz transformation, the scale factor does not change in the special case when it is equal to 1. Is this result true in general? i.e. is the ...
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3answers
107 views

Why did the matter in the early universe not stick together due to gravity?

(Feel free to correct any mistaken assumptions I have) The overall question I have is: given that the early universe started as an incredibly dense ball of matter and energy, why didn't that mass ...
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10 views

Correlation length during phase transitions in early Universe

During phase transitions of the second kind topological defects may form on the bounds of two areas separated by correlation length. In early Universe during phase transitions correlation length ...
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1answer
29 views

How was hydrogen gas (H) obtained by spectroscopists? Why is there more H than H2 in space?

Introductory quantum mechanics lessons talk about emission and absorption spectra for the hydrogen gas, and then give you an explanation as if this gas were pure $H$ atoms, and not the $H_2$ molecule ...
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2answers
204 views

How confident are we that mass is not being lost in the universe?

After reading about the latest super-massive black hole in Nature 518, 512–515 (26 February 2015), I couldn't help but wonder if the accelerating expansion is a result of mass being lost. My ...
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1answer
235 views

Are dark energy and zero-point energy the same thing?

According to Quantum Mechanics is it possible that the famous "dark energy" and "zero-point energy" are the same thing that drives the accelerated expansion of the universe or maybe related to each ...
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2answers
71 views

Where does the energy go when light is redshifted? [duplicate]

Imagine a galaxy millions of lightyears away and, obeying Hubble's law, moving very quickly away from us. Now imagine the same galaxy emitted a green photon in our direction (a photon with a ...
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2answers
125 views

Tachyonic field

i'm working on a paper about symmetron cosmology. symmetron is a scalar field that by its symmetry breaking can explain the dark energy. the action is: ans A , V are assumed to be: where M ...
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3answers
393 views

Books on cosmology

I am a 14 year old who is independently studying physics. I finished the book: Spacetime and Geometry: An Introduction to General Relativity by Sean Carroll. I am specifically interested in cosmology, ...
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2answers
2k views

Why do neutrino oscillations imply nonzero neutrino masses?

Neutrinos can pass from one family to another (that is, change in flavor) in a process known as neutrino oscillation. The oscillation between the different families occurs randomly, and the likelihood ...
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1answer
28 views

Is there any evidence from observational cosmology to say Dark Energy dominated era begins 5 billion years ago

People say that Dark Energy Dominated era begin 5 billion years ago. Do we have evidence for that from observations
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1answer
117 views

Can anyone explain the unit for rate of expansion of universe?

If you google for 'what is rate of expansion of universe' you get Space itself is pulling apart at the seams, expanding at a rate of 74.3 plus or minus 2.1 kilometers (46.2 plus or minus 1.3 ...
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1answer
54 views

Where would dark matter be produced?

There are a zoo of dark matter candidates. Are there any candidates which could be produced in extreme conditions such as black holes/active galactic nuclei/pulsars? After reading an article on WIMPs ...
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2answers
194 views

I understand the Big Bang Theory (BBT), but how was the matter in the BBT created?

I understand the Big Bang Theory to consist of all of the matter being pulled into one great gravitational pull. such a great force that it expelled the matter out causing the idea of Red-Shift and ...
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2answers
947 views

When did the first carbon nucleus in the Universe come into existence?

I am a chemist with a passion for astrophysics and particle physics, and one of the most marvellous things I have learned in my life is the process of stellar nucleosynthesis. It saddens me how my ...
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0answers
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A start point to learn cosmology [duplicate]

My major is not physics in university. So, My knowledge about physics is limited to the general physics I , II courses which we had to pass. On the other hand I heartfully like to learn cosmology. I ...
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2answers
236 views

Probability of spontaneous Boltzmann brain formation

I was reading through Scott Aaronson's notes (pdf), but I can't make sense of his discussion about Boltzmann brains on p61. Specifically the fact that it says: But the problem is worse. Since in ...
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2answers
123 views

Is entropy absolute (as in absolute temperature)?

Following this question on the Entropy at the Big Bang where I asked: Since Entropy always increases (in general); its expected that the entropy at the beginning of the universe should be the ...
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2answers
81 views

Explain relationship between angular diameter distance and luminosity distance, Etherington Theorem

I have a question relating to the Etherington Theorem. The luminosity distance is defined by the equation for flux, i.e. $F=\frac{L}{4\pi D_L^2}$ where flux is in units energy per unit time ...
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2answers
54 views

Cosmology: collisionless vs collisional fluids?

I try to understand the difference between collisionless and collisional fluids in cosmology. My first question is the following. In the context of FLRW cosmology, we suppose that the Universe can ...
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1answer
64 views

Stephen Hawking's theory of multiple universes [closed]

Is it correct to think that there are multiple universes? Does my thinking of having more than one big bang?
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2answers
100 views

If the universe is expanding will gravitational attraction eventually go to zero?

Let's assume that we prove that dark matter exists (after all, only about 4 percent of the entire universal mass is atoms, and 22% dark matter, 74% dark energy (I think I got the numbers right)). ...
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3answers
119 views

Does general relativity entail singularities if there's a positive cosmological constant?

I've heard that Hawking and Penrose proved that general relativity entails singularities. But it says in the abstract of what seems to be the paper in which they proved it (The Singularities of ...
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5answers
262 views

Is it possible that galaxies' redshift is caused by something else than the expansion of space?

I was thinking that maybe photons loss energy naturally when they travel great distances. Or maybe the mass of all matter is increasing over time and therefore photons emitted in the past are ...
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2answers
237 views

What is the significance of Planck force?

I have been curious to find what could be the significance of Planck force? It is calculated by the formula $c^4/G$, where $c$ is the speed of light; $G$ is the gravitational constant. Thus (the speed ...
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2answers
100 views

Why is universe expanding?

Okay, this question may sound silly: base on the observation Besides an expanding universe, would there be other possibilities? Would it be possible, say, there exists a fundamental repelling ...
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0answers
82 views

Master's Thesis in General Relativity [closed]

just throwing a query out to the Physics community. I'm about to embark on a master's in Gravitation, Cosmology and General Relativity and was looking for possible subjects to start researching. My ...
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3answers
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Why can we see the cosmic microwave background (CMB)?

I understand that we can never see much farther than the farthest galaxies we have observed. This is because, before the first galaxies formed, the universe was opaque--it was a soup of subatomic ...
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5answers
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Does (it make sense to say that ) the universe has a center?

I was reading this page: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2011/oct/23/brian-cox-jeff-forshaw-answers and I found this sentence by Brian Cox: That seems to imply that everything is flying away ...
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1answer
568 views

Additional merits to Wetterich's “Universe without expansion” compared to standard cosmological redshift interpretation?

A recent news item in Nature promotes Wetterich's preprint "A Universe without expansion". All sounds very exciting but hard to judge for non-experts. As I understand from the Nature's article, the ...
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1answer
672 views

Do quasars exist today?

Are there likely to be any quasars right now, or are all the ones we're seeing old galaxies today, like the Milky Way?
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1answer
153 views

Big Bang…or…Everywhere Stretch?

Recently I watched a minute-physics video that suggested that a better name for the beginning of time would be "Everywhere stretch" because there wasn't a space-time singularity that formed where the ...
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2answers
194 views

Origin of Universe [duplicate]

The universe is believed to have originated from absolutely nothing, and we know it is still expanding. Physics says "something can arise from nothing". I understand how mass and energy are related ...
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1answer
258 views

Pressure and density using a general Lagrangian

Given a lagrangian of a form: \begin{equation}\mathcal{L}=f(\phi,\partial_{\mu}\phi\partial^{\mu}\phi)\end{equation} where $f$ is a function, I need to derive pressure and density in a FLRW universe ...
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1answer
38 views

Difference between Enzo & Gadget astronomy simulation codes

Enzo and Gadget are simulation codes used in astronomy. What are the largest differences between them both in terms of physics they simulate and in their implementations?
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1answer
194 views

Is there any evidence against the Cosmological Principle?

I have been slowly getting more into math, but haven't gone into differential geometry or anything like that yet, so this question might be basic. Trying to get a deeper understanding of the ...
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2answers
81 views

Cosmological constants

I've heard that the cosmological constant is 0.[123 more zeros] and then a 1 [in some units]. Does that means that it used to be exactly zero? Is the value of this constant changing or is it fixed at ...
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1answer
102 views

Could the singularity that gave rise to our universe be past-eternal?

Are there any compelling models that include a past eternal singularity that ultimately gave rise to our universe? Does the "no-boundary" hypothesis that utilizes imaginary time have past eternal ...
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0answers
24 views

How redshift-space distortions affects baryonic acoustic oscillations

I have a question with BAO (baryonic acoustic oscillations) and RSD (redshift-space distortions). On large scales, Kaiser effect makes the observed radial separation of galaxies smaller then ...