The study of the large-scale structure, history, and future of the universe. Cosmology is about asking and answering questions about the "big picture" - the extent, origin, and fate of everything we know.

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Scale factor of the universe

Do we impose that the scale factor $a(t)$ of the Universe is a continuous function? Or there is a physical meaning? Usually in physics we define functions to be continuous, such as the velocity of a ...
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47 views

What are the roles of pre-heating and re-heating in inflation?

During inflation, the universe is thought to have cooled by a "factor of 100,000 or so" The abstract of this paper mentions 'preheating' as playing a role in particle production. Is this 'preheating' ...
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My question is about big bang theory [closed]

Oh srry my english is weak i am only 11 years old but i love physics my question was accourding to maxwell and enistien nothing can go faster than light and if we give an object enough energy to move ...
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34 views

A question relating to the Higgs boson scalar field

Just wondering. The potential for the Higgs boson is given by: $$ V(\varphi)=\lambda(\varphi^{2}-v^{2})^{2} $$ where $v≃$ 246 GeV is the vacuum expectation value required to explain mass in the ...
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47 views

Slow-roll approximation for potential $V=\frac{1}{2}m^{2}\varphi^{2}$

I'm attempting to derive a solution to the slow-roll approximation for a scalar potential of the form $V=\frac{1}{2}m^{2}\varphi^{2}$. For the solution for $a(t)$ I will start by taking the slow-roll ...
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1answer
60 views

Cosmology: equation of motion for a scalar field in conformal time [closed]

So, I've derived the equation of motion for a scalar field in "normal" time, $t$: $$ \ddot{\phi}+3H\dot{\phi}+\frac{dV(\phi)}{d\phi} $$ Then, using the expressions for the scalar field density, ...
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2answers
75 views

How is the universe flat?

I have real trouble visualising what is meant by the descriptor 'flat' when referred to the shape of the observable universe. Which one of the below is more accurate? a) It is flat in a 2D way, like ...
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2answers
110 views

Why doesn't the cosmological constant cause black holes to form?

The cosmological constant acts as matter with positive energy but negative pressure. Then a region $R$ should have energy $E\sim \Lambda r^3$. On the other hand, we know that the energy for a black ...
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2answers
102 views

How can we say time began at big bang?

I have seen many times scientists refer to time when Big Bang took place and space and time born out of singularity. 'Beginning of Time' is a very misleading statement,because process of beginning ...
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55 views

What are “the background equations” in cosmology?

We're currently working on perturbations within cosmology. There is something I have not heard before which has cropped up, that is: a reference to the term "the background equations". Are these just ...
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19 views

Rate of expansion of universe during big bang [duplicate]

We say big bang was the explosion not in the space but of the space itself that took place in a fraction of seconds. Speaking practically, we say the universe has no edge and is infinite. If the ...
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2answers
29 views

Redshift Versus Luminosity

I understand that there is a relation between the proper distance of a cosmic object and its "measurable" redshift, i.e. once you know the value of the redshift parameter z, then you actually know how ...
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Is the universe bounded?

As I understand it nobody can pinpoint an objective "center" of the universe nor "where" the Big Bang happened. It seems the observable universe is limited by our event horizon at some 14 billion ...
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continuum hypothesis in interstellar medium

I am reading some research papers on the model proposed to describe e.g. the interstellar medium. The interstellar medium, which is very rarefied, but its governing equations are based on the ...
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1answer
107 views

Gravity with more than one metric tensor

As weird as it sounds, yes, there are gravity theories with more than one metric tensor. This is called bimetric gravity. My question to those who have encountered bimetric gravity before: a) ...
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2answers
103 views

Scanning the universe - edit: expanding or shrinking

I know that this may sound as a very basic question, but how come that we can detect CMB radiation, light or gravitational waves from the big-bang era? Shouldn't this radiation has overtaken us a ...
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41 views

Did the universe have a temperature during inflation?

I've heard it said that inflation was not an equilibrium process. But I've also heard it said that during inflation, the temperature of the universe was much cooler than before or after. If the ...
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41 views

Quadrupole and Multipoles in Physics

I am a little confused over the notion of quadrupole and higher moments in physics in general. The first time I saw it was in electromagnetism, when we did multipole expansion to analyze higher ...
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2answers
73 views

Why relativity doesn't rule out Inflation theory? [duplicate]

Nothing can go faster than the speed of light, then how at the time of inflation space expanded faster than the speed of light? Clearly universe had already begun at the start (10−36 seconds) of ...
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2answers
63 views

Gravitational wave of Big bang? [duplicate]

Questions about the g-wave caused by the big bang: 1)was there a g-wave produced? 2) when will it reach us? 3) will it be too weak for us to detect(atleast now?)?
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Large gravitational waves

The recently detected gravitational wave at LIGO were extremely small - requiring a $1 billion interferometer to even detect its presence as it passes Earth. The gravitational constant G is small: ...
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50 views

What are the implications of the LIGO results in reference to our current Cosmological models?

I was looking for some explicit information on the implications of the LIGO results or probing eras prior to the or near to the Big Bang singularity. So, my question is therefore, what, if any, are ...
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62 views

Is there a truly stationary frame of reference? (part deux) [duplicate]

I wonder if the belief that there is no truly stationary frame of reference is really true. Here's my thinking, please poke holes in it and/or mock me :) As we understand it, before the big bang the ...
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3answers
223 views

How would we estimate, ahead of time, “the chances” of LIGO spotting black holes colliding in the period that it has been operating? [duplicate]

Can anyone summarize calculations that have been done about the theoretical probability of a detectable black hole collision happening in the observable universe within the time that LIGO has been ...
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46 views

Could the universe be a bubble in a larger mass?

I was reading this article which explains that Einstein originally thought about incorporating dark energy into relativity. It explains that dark energy is the thing that keeps pushing the universe ...
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319 views

Is there a “CGBR”?

The recent discovery by the LIGO made me wonder about this. We know that there exists a CMBR, Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation, a blanket of electromagnetic energy covering the universe, made by ...
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62 views

Is the expanding of the universe also a cause which can induce gravitational waves from mass? [duplicate]

Gravitational waves arises when mass is rotating in another mass'orbital, in explosions and of course in case of colliding black holes. But are they also created when mass is moving and speeding ...
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102 views

Is the cosmological time grosso modo isochrone?

Is the cosmological time grosso modo isochrone? by analogy with space isotropy. Or else do we have possibly great differences by analogy with great voids in the space. We know that it's not strictly ...
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130 views

How many galaxies could be the source of the recent LIGO detection?

The recent LIGO detection is pretty exciting, and a lot of people are asking whether there is a chance of optical detection of the black hole pair that created the signal. From a cursory reading of ...
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2answers
71 views

Does the speed of light change? [duplicate]

I know that there is a similar questions, but I think mine is a bit different. I wonder if with the expansion of the universe the speed of light changes. It seems that the speed of light is very ...
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64 views

Is it accurate to say that nothing can travel faster than $c$ in a GR context, where more space can be created?

Years ago, my brother and I had an argument where I was trying to convince him that nothing could travel faster than the speed of light. I was pursuing this in the context of Special Relativity. My ...
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1answer
73 views

Does a similar concept like centrifugal force exist for the whole universe? [duplicate]

Is it meaningful in the sense of falsificable to ask whether the whole universe (including everything known/observable: cosmic background radiation etc ..., excluding everything not directly ...
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1answer
50 views

Is there a limit to the size of black hole?

I have read answer by @John Rennie in regards to the size and density of black hole. In the last sentence he states that super supermassive black hole ...
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What is known about the physics of Planckbrane (another brane) in Randall–Sundrum model?

Randall–Sundrum model imagines that our universe is a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and the elementary particles except for the graviton are localized on a (3 + 1)-dimensional brane or branes. ...
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93 views

Density parameter (cosmology) as a function of redshift

Hopefully I'm missing some very basic algebra for this question. In essence, I need to derive the following: $$ \Omega=\Omega_{1}\frac{(1+z)}{1+\Omega_1{z}} $$ Now, I proceeded from the Friedmann ...
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Why do some stars actually produce “Gamma ray bursts”?

I looked it up but I haven't found any explanation as to why some stars produce them, I understand that collapsing and merging stars produce them, but my question is why is the energy concentrated in ...
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1answer
43 views

Number and energy density integrals in cosmological thermodynamics

I am working through Mukhanov's book "Physical Foundations of Cosmology" and something has me puzzled in the section on evaluating integrals for number density, energy density and pressure. The ...
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1answer
73 views

Importance of CP violation

To explain the matter-antimatter assymmetry, CP should be violated according to Sakharov conditions. Charge conjugation is required as matter and antimatter have opposite charges but why Parity ...
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1answer
144 views

The naive idea of the big bang

Many people think that according to big bang cosmology, first there was empty space, then there was an explosion in the middle of the emptiness, and now all the galaxies are flying away from that ...
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1answer
57 views

What would happen if you were to release the energies of the big bang in our universe a second time? [closed]

Would it just wipe out everything, or would something else occur?
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1answer
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Was the matter-energy content of our universe always distributed in the same ratios?

Currently, Dark energy (68.3%) and Dark matter (26.8%) together constitute about 95.1% total matter-energy content of the universe while only 4.9% is ordinary baryonic matter. Was this always the ...
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59 views

Would the Moon be able to take water from Earth?

I know that if you add mass to the moon, it would get closer to the Earth. We all know that the moon causes the tides because it's gravity pulls the water. So, my question is: If the moon gained more ...
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1answer
63 views

How could we know that the universe is homogeneous and isotropic at a moment?

Cosmologists say that the universe is homogeneous and isotropic within our Hubble volume based upon the astronomical observations. But how can we argue that the universe is homogeneous and isotropic ...
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1answer
80 views

Special Relativity problem - proper time interval

The supernova 1987A explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud 170 000 light years from Earth produced a burst of anti-neutrinos ν ̄e which were observed in terrestrial detectors. If the anti-neutrinos ...
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40 views

(naive?) interpretation of Hubble's Law

From my understanding, the Hubble constant $H_0$ calculates from observed redshifts $z$ of distant galaxys against their proper distance $D$. The current value appears to be 67.80(77) ...
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86 views

Universe vs Multiverse. Time and Space

Wikipedia defines a multiverse as a hypothetical set of finite and infinite possible universes. Similarly, it defines the Universe is as "all of time and space and its contents". On the surface, ...
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1answer
95 views

What is the meaning of the particle horizon in conformal diagrams?

I'm reading "Physical Foundations of Cosmology" (Mukhanov) and in Chapter 2.3 conformal diagrams get introduced. They seem to be a (graphical) tool to understand the causal structure of the universe. ...
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When did the strong force separate?

Given that Grand Unification may have happened, and inflation is accepted, which of these two scenarios is better accepted; 1) The strong force broke free before inflation, and is somehow causally ...
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530 views

Age of the universe versus absolute time [duplicate]

In Wikipedia, the age of the universe is defined as the "time elapsed since the Big Bang" while "time" links to "the cosmological time parameter of comoving coordinates" which itself links to "the ...
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Why do we look at non-flat geometries in Cosmology?

In Cosmology we use the Robertson-Walker-Metric which follows from the cosmological principle & mathematics. This metric leaves three cases for a possible curvature (or geometry) of space (not ...