9
votes
1answer
63 views

Is it possible to determine whether distant galaxies are gravitationally bound

In a previous question, one issue was related to the potential energy of cosmic structures. This raised in particular the question of whether these structures are gravitationally bound. If you ...
5
votes
4answers
63 views

Why doesn't the light from galaxies appear stretched? [duplicate]

Maybe it's my ignorance of astrophysics/cosmology, but I have been wondering this: Why do galaxies not appear stretched when we observe them? Assuming a galaxy that we observe is 100,000 light years ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Space within galaxies. Is it stuck by the gravity of the galaxy or expanding and “slipping past”? [duplicate]

I understand that the inter-galactic space is expanding but galaxies themselves are not. What is happening to the space within a galaxy? Is it fixed by the gravity of the galaxy or is it expanding and ...
2
votes
2answers
186 views

What does a galaxy orbit?

Moons orbit planets, planets orbit stars, and stars orbit the center of a galaxy. So, my question is what does a galaxy orbit? The center of universe? (I know that the universe has no center)
2
votes
1answer
85 views

Adding matter to make galaxies bigger

What are the actual factors that play a role in the accretion of matter into galaxies? I read about Accretion Disks but I don't quite understand how they work yet.
3
votes
2answers
117 views

Frame dragging — is there a “non-tiny” example?

Now. As I understand it, in fact, the earth (10^25 kg) creates a very small, very tiny, frame dragging effect. Indeed, we have measured this using satellite experiments. So, the Earth (10^25 kg) ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Redshift 1+z - CMB Temperature lower?

I know that $\frac{\lambda_2}{\lambda_1} = 1 + z$ Suppose a galaxy had redshfit $z=3$. Does this mean that the wavelength becomes $4\lambda$? Then by wien's law where $\lambda \propto \frac{1}{T}$, ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Question about Hubble's Law - expansion vs receding velocity [duplicate]

The distance to the galaxy NGC3198 is found to be $15.9 MPc$ and recession velocity is $680km s^{-1}$. What value of Hubble Constant is implied? If $H_0$ is in fact $72 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}$, what ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Dimension of galaxy filaments

Galaxy filaments are amongst the largest known cosmic structures in the universe. They [...] form the boundaries between large voids in the universe. As their name suggests filaments are ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Does the rate of expansion of the universe exceed the rate at which the local group is being pulled toward the Great Attractor?

I understand that the expansion rate of the universe driven dark energy exceeds the rate at which the local group is being pulled toward The Great Attractor (Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster). Does this ...
1
vote
2answers
91 views

Expanding universe and the peculiar velocity

Hubble's law states that the universe is expanding with a velocity equals Hubble's constant*distance from earth. But, recent findings show that the Andromeda galaxy is actually blueshifting towards us ...
4
votes
3answers
159 views

Faster than light galaxies/clusters?

A few years ago in an astronomy course, we calculated some (transverse?) velocity of a moving object and got super luminal results. The answer was apparent and not physical velocity of the object. ...
8
votes
2answers
380 views

How does dark matter halo outside a galaxy help to explain galaxy rotation curve?

How does a dark matter halo outside a galaxy help to explain a galaxy rotation curve? Suppose for simplicity we use a model of a star rotating about a more massive star in a fixed circular orbit. For ...
4
votes
6answers
224 views

Why are distant galaxies not actually tiny bits of matter?

Distant galaxies are said to be moving away from the Milky Way (and us) at speeds approaching the speed of light. Since Special Relativity tells us that any object moving away from us at a velocity of ...
6
votes
3answers
633 views

Why the red-shift of distant galaxies is considered to be the effect of expanding spacetime?

Why it's not explained just by Doppler redshift caused by faster movement of those galaxies billions of years ago when that light was emitted? Would the speeds of the galaxies necessary for Doppler ...
1
vote
1answer
837 views

Does the large red shift value of galaxies mean they are far away?

When the red shifts of galaxies are large, why do we think that they are far away? I know about Hubble's law, Tully-Fisher relation of spiral galaxies, Faber-Jackson relation of elliptical ...
4
votes
1answer
217 views

Does the dark matter halo rotate with the galaxy?

If the dark matter halo is stationary related to the arms of the galaxy then tidal effects should slow the galaxy rotation. If it rotates with the normal matter in the galaxy then shouldn't it ...
4
votes
5answers
220 views

Is dark matter around the Milky Way spread in a spiral shape (or, in a different shape)?

Dark matter doesn't interact with electromagnetic radiation, but it, at least, participates in gravitational interactions as known from the discovery of dark matter. But does dark matter exist in a ...
2
votes
0answers
217 views

Why do galaxies collide? Reconciling dark energy and an expanding universe with the fact that some galaxies are on a collision course

My layman understanding of cosmology is: galaxies are uniformly (more or less) spread throughout the universe, per the Big Bang and the fact that in a central explosion, all dispersed points are ...
5
votes
1answer
303 views

How and why will the Milky way collide with the Andromeda?

Hubble's law says that the universe is expanding.How come the milky way and the andromeda are on a collision course?How will they end up colliding with each other?
7
votes
4answers
622 views

What does ionization of neutral Hydrogen have to do with “transparency”?

Most accounts of the early history of the Universe make some reference to (re)ionization as being the reason that the Universe becomes transparent after a period of opacity caused by the absence of ...
19
votes
3answers
2k views

How would we tell antimatter galaxies apart?

Given that antimatter galaxies are theoretically possible, how would they be distinguishable from regular matter galaxies? That is, antimatter is equal in atomic weight and all properties, except for ...
8
votes
3answers
124 views

What's dark matter and who discovered it?

I have heard about dark matter that's called the Master Of The Universe. What's this and is the dark matter the reason galaxies exist?
5
votes
2answers
202 views

Does the recent re-count of stars in elliptical gallaxies affect our understanding of the universal mass balance?

I've seen several popular reports of a new count of low-mass stars in elliptical galaxies (here's one). Edit: Pursuant to several correct comments I've changed the title to agree with the actual ...