Cosmological inflation refers to an era of expansion that lasted for approximately $10^{-34}$ seconds, during which the universe expanded by a factor of approximately $10^26$ in every direction. This is different from ordinary space expansion and from the acceleration in expansion we experience now ...

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Quantum Entanglement Versus Inflation in the Early Universe?

Quantum entanglement is one of the most fascinating and mysterious phenomena in nature. It needs no interactions, or any sort of exchange for it to take place. It is possible, not against any rules of ...
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201 views

Is the Big Bang defined as before or after Inflation?

Is the Big Bang defined as before or after Inflation? Seems like a simple enough question to answer right? And if just yesterday I were to encounter this, I'd have given a definite answer. But I've ...
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What prevented the early universe to become a black hole before inflation? [duplicate]

I am an ignoramus on this subject, and I assume that these statements quoted from wikipedia are more or less accurate:(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inflaton) 1) Prior to the expansion period, the ...
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primordial perturbations

According to cosmic inflation, primordial perturbations are adiabatic. As in, the fractional number density of all types of particles is the same, n_baryons = n_photons etc. But what would it mean if ...
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131 views

Could the same symmetry be finetuning both the Higgs mass and the inflaton's interactions?

The observed Higgs boson mass is at an interesting place in parameter space, placing the standard model electroweak vacuum right at the edge of metastability. Among the proposed explanations of this ...
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53 views

What does the “size of the universe” mean if the Universe is infinite?

There are questions that may seem to be similar to this one, but I've yet to find an answer. I have come to understand that a flat universe, that is to say a curverature of $k=0$ which means that ...
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454 views

What experiments compete with BICEP 2, and when are their results expected?

The recent results of the BICEP 2 experiment published on March 17th 2014, has generated a lot of media attention, with the general consensus being that "this is a major discovery" perhaps leading to ...
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44 views

How long did it take for the universe to become 1 one light year?

Given the density, pressure and other cosmological parameters. At this point we're not even thinking of time... But would this have occurred during or post Inflation? Could this be the Expansion ...
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44 views

Why would a second flat direction spoil inflation?

In inflationary model building, the standard lore is that there must be only one flat direction for the inflaton, i.e. it must roll down a valley in field space. Why is that? How would a second flat ...
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154 views

Difference between horizon and flatness problems & how inflation solves flatness (w/out math)

Layman here so I'm hoping for an answer for my query that doesn't involve math. I'm reading about inflation and how it solves the flatness and horizon problems. I get that the horizon problem deals ...
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184 views

What's the $\ell$ in the Bicep2 paper mean?

The BICEP experiment's recent announcement included the preprint of their paper, BICEP2 I: Detection of $B$-mode polarization at degree angular scales. BICEP2 Collaboration. To be submitted. ...
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FRW metric and its validity througout the age of the universe

Why do we think that the FRW metric should be valid throughout the entire history of the universe?
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34 views

Are there other places to look for the gravitational wave, other than space?

The recent BICEP2 announcements about the existence of gravity waves made the news, and made a big pitch for cosmic inflation, in the process they also claimed to detect the existence of gravitational ...
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150 views

Does Lyapunov exponent equate to exponential inflation?

Physics can be modeled by dynamical systems $f^t(x)$ as well as by PDEs. The most common dynamical system has hyperbolic fixed point and can be an attractor or a repellor. The dynamics at repellors ...
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2answers
240 views

How do we know that space expanded with speed faster that a speed of light during big-bang inflation?

How do we know that space expanded faster than a speed of light in inflation? I have read this Phys.SE question, and it says that limit for faster than a speed of light is for matter and waves only. I ...
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88 views

Inflation in a closed universe or a stage 1 multiverse?

With the discovery of gravitational waves, Max Tegmark has been using this to promote his level 1 multiverse in that the universe is open (non-compact) and everything duplicates. My question is, are ...
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33 views

Sign of Hubble slow-roll parameters

Given the Hubble slow-roll parameters $\epsilon=-\frac{\dot{H}}{H^{2}}$ and $\eta=\frac{\dot{\epsilon}}{H\epsilon}$, can they assume negative values? For inflation to occurr they are required to be ...
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848 views

How did the inflaton field “add” energy to the universe?

How did inflation add energy to the universe? What mechanism did this occur by? In other words, where did that energy come from? Was it due to the quantum fluctuation (or that scalar field rolling ...
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48 views

Negative Energy in Inflation Theory (Low/Zero Energy Universe)

I've been reading Max Tegmark's book: Our Mathematical Universe. It's very interesting, but I wanted to know more about one particular thing. The book simplifies things and I know inflation theories ...
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Why doesn't the light from galaxies appear stretched? [duplicate]

Maybe it's my ignorance of astrophysics/cosmology, but I have been wondering this: Why do galaxies not appear stretched when we observe them? Assuming a galaxy that we observe is 100,000 light years ...
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Size of universe after inflation?

Wikipedia states the period of inflation was from $10^{-36}$sec to around $10^{-33}$sec or $10^{-32}$sec after Big Bang, but it doesn't say what the size of the universe was when inflation ended. ...
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2answers
266 views

gravitational waves and inflation theory

I am not a technical guy and I have no scientific knowloedge in physics but I have been reading books, watching videos in order to understand our cosmology and ...
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0answers
17 views

Why the initial spectrum of perturbation of inflation must be Gaussian?

Why the initial spectrum of perturbation of inflation must be Gaussian? I heared it was because of Central Limit theorem. But I don't know how use this theorem explicitly in this question to get this ...
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What's the difference between correlation functions and S-matrix, and between in-in formalism (or “closed time path formalism”) and in-out formalism?

I was reading the "in-in" formalism (or "closed time path formalism" used in condensed matter physics) in cosmology created by Schwinger in 1961, and there is a saying: "they care about correlation ...
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95 views

How did the universe get so big so fast? [duplicate]

The universe started at the big bang around 15 billion years ago. The universe is now at least 92 billion light-years in diameter. Together, don't these mean that the universe, at some time in the ...
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Does expanding space cost energy?

Does the cosmic inflation reduce the energy density (inversely) proportional to the volume, or does the inflation "cost" energy? Is space itself "something" created at the expense of energy?
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49 views

Number of Stars vs Value of Omega (Crtitical Density of the Universe)

I may be badly mixing things up here. If I am, please kindly correct me. As I understand it, if the universe was too dense at the start of the big bang, it would have collapsed back in on itself. Too ...
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How do inflationary models predict the generation of gravitational waves during the inflationary period?

Recent results from the BICEP2 experiment have produced a lot of talk about the primordial gravitational waves produced during the inflationary period. I would like to have some explanation about how ...
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397 views

Before inflation, what sets the initial value of the inflaton field?

[This is a version of the question that I've revised based on helpful comments from Dan.] I haven't studied inflation at a technical level. My picture of the process is that we have an inflaton field ...
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33 views

Attractive higgs force and inflation

Inflation was the extreme accelerating expansion of the universe, see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inflation_(cosmology) It worked in a similar way to dark energy but was so strong it would ...
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32 views

Is the expansion accelerating or decelerating? [duplicate]

I have already asked this on Astronomy.SE but I couldn't understand the answer there. According to Hubble's Law, the farther a galaxy is, the farther it is moving away. But do we take into account ...
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34 views

Units and missing constants in quintessence expressions?

In cosmology, quintessence is an alternative to the cosmological constant. In this approach (described here), we consider a scalar field $\phi$ and its self-interacting potential $V\left(\phi\right)$ ...
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56 views

The speed of light during the inflationary period

Introduction: As a thought experiment, suppose I modified the value of $c$ (speed of light) in some local region and attempted to measure it with a clock placed in that same region. I will denote ...
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86 views

Why did everything in space cooled out?

Through my research, I learned that; According to thermophysics, heat always moves from and area of high heat to an area of low heat. Space has no heat at all. It is extremely cold However, ...
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What was the major discovery on gravitational waves made March 17th, 2014, in the BICEP2 experiment?

The Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics held a press conference today to announce a major discovery relating to gravitational waves. What was their announcement, and what are the implications? ...
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1answer
82 views

Object that causes spacetime to expand?

Is there any thing that will cause spacetime to expand, so that particles are pushed away from them rather than pulled towards it. I know things such as black holes and planets causes dips and curve ...
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photons in expanding space: how is energy conserved?

If a photon (wave package) redshifts (streches) traveling in our expanding universe, is it's energy reduced? If so, where does it go?
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2answers
83 views

Entropy was created after inflation?

I'm puzzeled by a statement in Big Bang Cosmology-review about the reheating phase subsequent to the exponential expansion during inflation: In this reheating process, entropy has been created ...
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Is redshift the only way by which we can tell that space is expanding?

There's another question on physics.SE whose answer, if I have understood it correctly, explains that the farther the points are in space the faster they are moving away from each other. Actually, ...
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What is chaotic about Chaotic Inflation?

Chaos is defined as an aperiodic long-termed behavior, that is very sensitive to initial conditions. Now from this definition I can only conclude that the adjective 'chaos' is a mere analogy, since ...
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Cosmological constant doubts

I have read about cosmological constant given by einstein in universe in nutshell as well as in general and special relativity. But still I am not able to understand the aim to use it or to introduce ...
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Are black holes trapdoors to the center of the universe? [closed]

Correct me if i'm wrong here, but if you consider the analogy of inflating balloon when explaining the universe expansion, then the center of the universe lies within the center of the inflating ...
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3answers
955 views

Will the Big Rip tear black holes apart?

There seems to be an obvious contradiction between the predictions of the physics of black holes and the Big Rip, a predicted event about 16.7 Gyr in the future where local groups, galaxies, solar ...
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1answer
153 views

the nature of the big bang

If space-time expanded together with matter then why do physicist bother extrapolating backwards the expansion back to a point in time? I mean does that really tell us anything? I mean if the speed of ...
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58 views

What does it mean to have infinite negative conformal time?

In the context of Inflationary Cosmology, it is postulated that there was a period of shrinking Hubble Sphere radius $(aH)^{-1}$. $$ \frac{d}{dt} (aH)^{-1} < 0 $$ Then the regions of the ...
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1answer
40 views

Primordial flunctuation gave rise to cosmic structures?

I'm not a physicist, not even a physics student. I'm just reading Lawrence Krauss's book A Universe From Nothing and I got stuck understanding a concept. In his book, Lawrence says: Quantum ...
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1answer
110 views

Is the Universe Past-Eternal?

Does the Borde-Guth-Vilenkin theorem definitively demonstrate that the Universe cannot be past-eternal, whatsoever? Does it not assume a classical space-time while the real world requires Quantum ...
8
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1answer
130 views

In the B mode power spectrum, what is the relationship between the multipole number and the wavelength of the seed gravitational waves?

One of the key datasets of the recent BICEP2 results is the B mode power spectrum shown below. The existence of these B modes implies the existence of gravitational waves prior to inflation. My ...
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59 views

In a universe that is expanding at a constant rate, do objects that are attracted to each other feel a force opposite to their attraction?

In this article, the authors make the claim (pg 44) that "Expansion by itself—that is, a coasting expansion neither accelerating nor decelerating—produces no force." I'm having a hard time convincing ...
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84 views

The gravity waves from the big bang? How can we know?

The latest news says that scientists detected gravitational waves from the Big Bang. My question is how do they know the waves originated in the big bang verses any number of supernovae and or ...