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2
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1answer
187 views

Entropy of the cosmological constant and the laws of thermodynamics?

Convention The convention being used is: $ A_{C} = $ The classical variable Premise Consider the following toy-model universe: A universe with a positive cosmological constant. Basic ...
-2
votes
1answer
57 views

Reading a Paper on the Cosmological Constant Problem [closed]

My professor wants to give me (and another kid) a problem in quantum cosmology. To that end, he asked me to read through his recent paper that appeared in the Physical Review Letters. He said that I ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Is cosmological constant really constant?

As the Universe expands, the dark energy in it also increases. I heard that the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ represents dark energy, so that constant must change as time passes, right? Correct me ...
6
votes
1answer
229 views

The cosmological constant as a Lagrange multiplier?

The cosmological constant $\Lambda$ can be introduced into the gravitational action like this : \begin{equation} S = \frac{1}{2 \kappa} \int_{\Omega} (R - 2 \Lambda) \sqrt{-g} \; d^4 x + \text{matter ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Why does the flatness problem (of the universe) present a fine tuning problem?

The Friedmann equation can be written $$|\Omega-1|=\frac{|k|}{a^2H^2}$$ In a period where the universe is decelerated $a^2H^2$ becomes bigger as we extrapolate into the past. We know $|\Omega-1|$ ...
6
votes
4answers
399 views

Can the cosmological constant change with time?

This post is a specialization of the post: Can the proportion of dark energy change? Can the cosmological constant change with time? If so, is there a measurement of this evolution up to now, and ...
0
votes
1answer
372 views

Does the Casimir effect give the correct value for Dark Energy?

My understanding is that the Casimir Effect is caused by vacuum energy. Quantum mechanics (QED) predicts vacuum energy, but gets the value grossly wrong, by a factor of $10^{120}$. On the other hand, ...
5
votes
2answers
285 views

Would cosmological redshift be present in the following situation?

I'm trying to understand if cosmological redshift is just a secondary form of doppler redshift, or something else entirely. Suppose the two galaxies in the picture are receding from each other, but ...
3
votes
0answers
77 views

Why is Weinberg's prediction of omega sub lambda ($\Omega_{\Lambda}$) other than sophisiticated tautology?

I am not a physicist, but I do have a background in engineering (EE and computer science) and have followed physics and cosmology on a primarily conceptual basis for many years. I have looked at ...
15
votes
5answers
4k views

Do the laws of physics evolve?

Hubble's constant $a(t)$ appears to be changing over time. The fine stucture constant $\alpha$, like many others in QFT, is a running constant that varies, proportional to energy being used to measure ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

Should Anti de Sitter Universe collapse exponentially? (n0)

The de Sitter Universe is described by the Friedmann equation with $k=0$, $\rho=0$ and a positive cosmological constant $\Lambda$: $$\Big(\frac{\dot{a}}{a}\Big)^2=\frac{\Lambda c^2}{3}$$ The ...
6
votes
2answers
507 views

Lorentz invariance of the Minkowski metric

As far as I understand, one requires that in order for the scalar product between two vectors to be invariant under Lorentz transformations $x^{\mu}\rightarrow x^{\mu^{'}}=\Lambda^{\mu^{'}}_{\,\,\...
2
votes
2answers
115 views

Why doesn't the cosmological constant cause black holes to form?

The cosmological constant acts as matter with positive energy but negative pressure. Then a region $R$ should have energy $E\sim \Lambda r^3$. On the other hand, we know that the energy for a black ...
5
votes
1answer
75 views

Interplay between the cosmological constant and “microscopic” properties of string vacua

As far as I understand, string phenomenology is usually concerned with compactifications of string theory, M-theory or F-theory in which the uncompactified dimensions form a 4-dimensional Minkowski ...
35
votes
2answers
2k views

Are modified theories of gravity credible?

I'm a statistician with a little training in physics and would just like to know the general consensus on a few things. I'm reading a book by John Moffat which basically tries to state how GR makes ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Thought experiments about $c$ [closed]

Poincare had a brilliant thought experiment about what if everything in the universe doubled in size, would anybody notice any difference or even be able to measure anything that can be compared with ...
5
votes
3answers
622 views

G4v Gravity Theory: Why does this get rid of Dark Energy?

Earlier this year, Carver Mead of CalTech published a paper which seems to be garnering a lot of attention: http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.04866 http://www.npl.washington.edu/AV/altvw180.html http://...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What is meant by positive and negative gravity/energy/spacetime-curvature?

I have recently come across some cosmological assertions (based on empirical data) about the universe being self contained in the sense that it is entirely capable of coming into existence from a zero-...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

How come the cosmological constant supports the idea of dark energy existing? [duplicate]

According to an article I've read recently, the cosmological constant was used to support the theory of dark energy. But the cosmological constant already defines an inclination in the essence of ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Connection between the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ and the cutoff scale $\Lambda$

I'm trying to understand the connection between the $\Lambda$ from cosmology and the $\Lambda$ from QFT. Cosmology: The cosmological constant enters the Einstein equations. In the special case of the ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

Doesn't the presence of dark energy make the flatness problem less important?

If the cosmological constant (aka dark energy / vacuum energy) were zero, then an Omega greater than 1 would mean both positive curvature and a recollapse while an Omega less than 1 would mean both ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

Generalized Bekenstein-Hawking temperature for Kerr-Newmann-dS black holes

What is the formula for the Bekenstein-Hawking temperature in a Kerr-Newmann-de Sitter spacetime, i.e., the temperature for a black hole with Mass (M), angular momentum (J), electric charge (Q) and ...
12
votes
4answers
820 views

Why didn't Newton have a cosmological constant

Einstein initially added the Cosmological Constant because (if I get this right) it seemed to him that the universe should be static. I agree that back then this would have been an obvious assumption. ...
1
vote
1answer
184 views

Cosmological Constant on the LHS of Einstein's Field Equation

The cosmological constant seems to be normally described as an energy (repulsive force, Dark Energy) of Space-Time. I was just wondering, if we were to interpret the cosmological constant as being ...
2
votes
1answer
348 views

Is there a relationship between the Cosmological constant and the Hubble constant?

I looked around to see if this precise question was asked before and it appears not to be. So is it just me or has anyone else noticed that, no matter what consistent set of units you use, $$ \...
0
votes
3answers
452 views

Expansion of the Universe: Conversion of gravitational potential energy to kinetic energy?

Suppose there is an object floating in space which over time begins to fall toward the source of a gravitational field. As it falls, its motion happens to be such that it gets locked in orbit around ...
4
votes
2answers
93 views

What evidence is there for additional dark energy coming into existence when space increases?

As I understand since cosmological constant is a 'constant' - increasing the space must generate additional dark energy that fills that space This does sound counter-intuitive to me, but I am sure ...
4
votes
1answer
60 views

What is the analogous effect of cosmological redshift for particles with mass?

Due to the metric expansion of space, light emitted from earlier times in faraway parts of the universe and travels for a long time to reach us get progressively redshifted, decreasing the energy of ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Problems of General Relativity on small and large scales [duplicate]

As far as I know, the most important problem of GR on large scales is the cosmological constant problem which in some manner can be thought of as a dark energy problem (please correct me if I am wrong)...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Cosmological constant in General Relativity [duplicate]

According to my GR notes the cosmological constant can be thought of as a vacuum energy much in the same way as the ground state of the harmonic oscillator. The notes claim that the regularised energy ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Is it possible to directly test whether of not the vacuum gravitates?

According to GR, all sources of stress-energy (e.g. everything on the $T_{\mu\nu}$ side of the EFE) should gravitate (e.g. affect the curvature/$G_{\mu\nu}$ side of the EFE). We observe the expansion ...
-1
votes
1answer
105 views

Difference between Cosmologial Constant and Quantum Vacuum State

Hello I am very new to cosmology and quantum physics. I need some basic understanding (in Layman's term) of the Difference between Cosmological Constant and Quantum Vacuum. Cosmological Constant is, ...
1
vote
1answer
421 views

Are dark energy and zero-point energy the same thing?

According to Quantum Mechanics is it possible that the famous "dark energy" and "zero-point energy" are the same thing that drives the accelerated expansion of the universe or maybe related to each ...
4
votes
0answers
103 views

Locality, unitarity & vacuum energy

I've read in a set of lecture notes that the requirement of locality and unitarity in QFT imply that the vacuum must have a non-zero energy associated with it (http://arxiv.org/abs/1502.05296 , top of ...
2
votes
3answers
178 views

Does general relativity entail singularities if there's a positive cosmological constant?

I've heard that Hawking and Penrose proved that general relativity entails singularities. But it says in the abstract of what seems to be the paper in which they proved it (The Singularities of ...
1
vote
0answers
103 views

The fate of Poincaré recurrence with the Big Rip

Recently, there has been a lot of talk in the media about the "Big Rip". It most certainly resulted from the paper by Marcelo M. Disconzi and Thomas W. Kephart where they have figured out a ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

Cosmological constants

I've heard that the cosmological constant is 0.[123 more zeros] and then a 1 [in some units]. Does that means that it used to be exactly zero? Is the value of this constant changing or is it fixed at ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

How to find de Sitter and almost de Sitter solutions in (super)string theory

From Cosmology, we have learned that we live in an almost de Sitter (positively accelerated!) Universe. It seems that dS space solutions in superstring/theory are problematic and there are some no-go ...
0
votes
0answers
87 views

DGP brane world model

In the DGP brane world model, accelerating expansion is due to the leakage of gravity into the bulk which gets rid of the dark energy. But why do they introduce the cosmological constant or scalar ...
14
votes
1answer
1k views

Why are anti-de Sitter spaces so interesting when we believe the universe is expansionary?

Perhaps this is a naive question, but in my recent (admittedly limited) readings about AdS spaces, I keep wondering why they seem to be such a hotbed for theoretical research (AdS/CFT correspondence, ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

What are the zero point energy densities of the individual quantum fields?

I'm reading through "General Relativity - An Introduction for Physicists", by Hobson, Efstathiou, and Lasenby, and I have a question regarding one of the statements related to the cosmological ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

Cosmological constant theories

Are there any hypotheses on the expansion of the universe, which have a cosmological constant, or some other parameter, that results in a universe with an ever increasing rate of acceleration for the ...
3
votes
2answers
201 views

Relation between $\Lambda$ and $\Omega_\Lambda$ in $\Lambda\mathrm{CDM}$

In minimal $\Lambda\mathrm{CDM}$, there is a parameter labeled $\Omega_\Lambda$, and current fits place it at around $\left( \Omega_\Lambda \sim 0.73\right)$. Meanwhile, $\Lambda$ enters the Einstein ...
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votes
4answers
1k views

Negative pressure, tension, and energy conditions

We have lots of common everyday experience with positive pressure, the canonical example is a gas. But other examples of positive pressure are easy to imagine: for instance, a solid that gets ...
0
votes
4answers
523 views

What are the differences between dark energy and a cosmological constant?

My possibly mistaken understanding is that dark energy changes with time, whereas a cosmological constant is, well, constant. What about gravitational clumping? Detecting relative motion?
-1
votes
1answer
159 views

How can we know that virtual particles exist everywhere in space and not just locally around individual particles our are universe as a whole?

The metaphor of virtual particles that inhabit all of space is used to explain quantum fluctuations. This ceases to be just a metaphor due to the effects of gravity as clumps of any energy (not just ...
0
votes
1answer
114 views

Is there any paper analyzing the validity of Relativity in expanding space? [duplicate]

Big Bang models result from applying Relativity equations to expanding space; however, as Einstein noted, Relativity was not established in expanding space. A basic question arises: is Relativity ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Why do scientists use a different method from redshift to find the distance of distant galaxies?

The method I am referring to is measuring the brightness of a super nova. Does the redshift method even work at that distance and if it doesn't why not? If it does work why do they prefer to use the ...
1
vote
3answers
207 views

Expanding universe as predicted by the Einstein Field Equation

Without the cosmological constant, the Einstein field equation predicts the universe is expanding. Why is that? It is counter-intuitive because generally gravity should pull things closer and shrink ...
0
votes
2answers
141 views

Why is the cosmological constant a scalar?

Maybe my understanding is just off, but the cosmological constant is just a scalar, right? What are it's units? Why a scalar? - was a tensor 'cosmological constant' ever considered or is it just not ...