A set of numbers used to quantify location in space.

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5answers
197 views

A reference frame is any coordinate system or just a set of Cartesian axes?

In Physics the idea of a reference frame is one important idea. In many texts I've seem, a reference frame is not defined explicitly, but rather there seems to be one implicit definition that a ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Description of charged sphere with Heaviside function in cylindrical coordinates

I need to describe density of charge of uniformly charged sphere (radius R, total charge Q, position of centre (0,0,0)) with Dirac delta function and Heaviside step function. The hard part is to ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

What is the function type of the generalized momentum?

Let $$L:{\mathbb R}^n\times {\mathbb R}^n\times {\mathbb R}\to {\mathbb R}$$ denote the Lagrangian (it should be differentiable) of a classical system with $n$ spatial coordinates. In the action ...
2
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1answer
65 views

Gradient and curl of a field in polar coordinates

How do we determine the gradient and curl of a scalar/vector field in polar coordinates? For instance, if we have the following potential energy function for a force, $$U = ...
1
vote
2answers
135 views

Do rotation matrices rotate about inertial or body angles? [closed]

I have Yaw, pitch, and roll angles in that order (Euler 321) to apply to a body reference frame in cartesian coordinate system. I want to know what the body reference frame vector coordinates are ...
-1
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3answers
236 views

Finding the appropriate coordinate transformation given two metrics

Given the two-dimensional metric $$ds^2=-r^2dt^2+dr^2$$ How can I find a coordinate transformation such that this metric reduces to the two-dimensional Minkowski metric? I know that ...
0
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0answers
31 views

from right ascension and declination to angle from semi-major axis

I am working on a research project and having trouble converting from ascension and declination to angles with respect to the semi-major axis. The target coordinate system has its origin at the ...
2
votes
1answer
161 views

Langevin equations in translational and rotational direction

I want to describe the following system. A bead is connected with a tether. There is a force $\vec{F}_{up}=F_{up}\hat{y}$ that acts on the bead. The tether acts with a force on the bead, this force ...
1
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0answers
115 views

Boyer–Lindquist coordinates

In the Kerr solution to the vacuum Einstein Equation written in Boyer–Lindquist coordinates. Because it is not spherical polar coordinates, $r$ ranges from 0 to infinity does not cover all the space, ...
4
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2answers
788 views

Metric tensor in special and general relativity

I'm having trouble understanding the metric tensor in general relativity. What I've understood so far has come from my course lecture notes used in conjunction with "The Road to Reality" by Roger ...
1
vote
2answers
189 views

What does it mean to divide space and time?

Goldstein's mechanics book, on the chapter on relativistic mechanics says that "We cannot assume that all observers make the same division into time and space in the same way." What does it mean to ...
1
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5answers
446 views

Is the polar coordinate system non-inertial or inertial?

Consider a car driving around in a circle lying in the plane and suppose we were interested in determining its acceleration as measured by an observer stationary on the "ground" or whatever. ...
2
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1answer
77 views

In the Heisenberg uncertainty principle

In Heisenberg uncertainty principle why do we only talk about uncertainty in position along $x$ axis, why not along other dimensions as well?
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1answer
67 views

Computing the angular momentum in spherical coordinates [closed]

How to compute the angular momentum of a particle in spherical coordinates? It's given by: $$x_1=r\cdot\cos(\phi)\cdot\sin(\theta)$$ $$x_2=r\cdot\sin(\phi)\cdot\sin(\theta)$$ ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Can a free falling observer localize the event horizon by calculations?

I'm think that in general relativity we can always pass the one curve in one coordinate system for another coordinate system. My intuition say that the free falling observer locate the event horizon ...
4
votes
3answers
116 views

If a Killing vector field is timelike, can it be set to $\partial/\partial t$?

If one has a Killing vector that turned out to be a timelike Killing vector field because of negative norm. Can we set this Killing vector field equal to $\partial/\partial t$?
4
votes
3answers
203 views

Coordinates for FLRW metric

In GR, coordinate are just a tool for us to describe the physics, they should be equivalent. However, in standard form of FLRW metric, it can be inferred that the universe is expanding, but we can do ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

How is north defined for any point on the surface of the earth?

While studying about terrestrial magnetism, references were made to north direction, and the geographic meridian and later magnetic meridian defined using that. But what is actually the north ...
4
votes
2answers
108 views

Peskin and Schroeder passive and active translation

In peskin and Schroeder's qft book, in chapter two, they're discussing Noether's theorem with respect to translations of co-ordinates. They describe and "infinitesimal" translation $x^\mu\rightarrow ...
0
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3answers
114 views

Is there any use for non-orthogonal frames? [closed]

In regular three dimensional space we always limit ourselves to Cartesian (i. e. orthonormal) frames. This has lots of advantages: dot products are easy, no need to distinguish between vectors and ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Why we can omit some forces while applying linear momentum principle

While applying linear momentum principle, namely that if force is zero linear momentum of the system is constant, in textbook they don't count for $N$ force from $M \to m.$ This force have component ...
2
votes
2answers
146 views

Curved space-time VS change of coordinates in Minkowski space

I'm looking for a rather intuitive explanation (or some references) of the difference between the metric of a curved space-time and the metric of non-inertial frames. Consider an inertial reference ...
0
votes
0answers
69 views

Invariant Form of The Material Derivative

Why is the RHS of the following equation invariant to coordinate transformation and the LHS is not? And is there a way to show the equivalency between the LFS and RHS? \begin{align} \vec{V} \cdot ...
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0answers
48 views

Determine generalised coordinates in Lagrangian problems

Can someone teach me how to find out generalised coordinates in a particular system? I've been struggling few days about this...here are 2 cases... A body with mass $m$ is lying on a smooth, ...
5
votes
0answers
93 views

Is there an equivalent of Rindler coordinates for an object in centripetal motion?

Rindler coordinates are a parametrization of (a subset of) Minkowski space that are "natural" for an object experiencing constant acceleration - more specifically, an object experiencing constant ...
2
votes
3answers
305 views

Why don't we define absolute coordinates?

Why don't we chose a random point in the void present between galaxy clusters and define it as the absolute origin? I know that rest is not absolute and that space expands, but we can easily keep ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

When does acceleration due to gravity equal positive/negative? [closed]

For example a projectile is launched at an angle. What would $a$ in $y=vt +.5at^2$ be? Let's say I choose up to be positive. How do you not confuse yourself whether to use positive or negative $a$?
2
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2answers
164 views

Are solutions coordinate invariant?

In the case of electromagnetism, we can solve the sorceless wave equation in Cartesian coordinates ($x$,$y$,$z$) getting plane waves as solutions: $$ u(x) = A(x-ct) + B(x+ct) $$ and actually I am not ...
2
votes
0answers
90 views

Kleppner derivation of Lorentz transformation

I am reading Kleppner.(Lorentz transformations) He said,we take the most general transformation relating the coordinates of a given event in the two systems to be of the form $$x'=Ax +Bt, y'=y, z'=z, ...
0
votes
2answers
97 views

Magnetic quantum numbers - axes correspondence

We know that the magnetic quantum number describes the space orientation of an orbital within an atom. For the $p$-orbital, the magnetic quantum numbers can be -1,0,1 (one for every axis). We have ...
0
votes
1answer
179 views

How to calculate the horizon line of a satellite?

I need an equation to calculate a list of Earth-centered, Earth-fixed (ECEF) XYZ coordinates on the earth that represent the visibility limit of satellite given its ECEF XYZ coordinates. For any ...
1
vote
0answers
79 views

Euclidean AdS space in Poincaré coordinates

I have read anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and its Euclidean version both in Global and Poincaré coordinates. For Lorentzian case it is clear how one Poincaré patch cover only one half of the whole AdS ...
-1
votes
3answers
49 views

Commutation Relationship

For the Hamiltonian of the hydrogen atom, does the square of angular momentum, $$L^2 = L_x^2+L_y^2+L_z^2$$ commute with Hamiltonian operator, $$H = \frac{1}{2m}(p_x^2+p_y^2+p_z^2) + V(r)~?$$ Should ...
-1
votes
2answers
290 views

How to know the Direction of the Acceleration Vector?

If the exercise doesn't give you the direction, how to know the correct one? Sometimes I assume its to the right and it was actually to the left, and I get everything wrong. Example here: How can I ...
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0answers
86 views

Manifold for Schwarzschild and Bertotti-Robinson

In short: what is the manifold in discussion for Schwarzschild metric $$ ds^2 = -(1-\frac {2M}r)dt^2 + \frac1{1-\frac{2M}r} dr^2 + r^2 (d\theta^2 + \sin^2 \theta d\phi^2)$$ and Bertotti-Robinson ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

What is the procedure (matrix) for change of basis to go from Cartesian to polar coordinates and vice versa?

I'm following along with these notes, and at a certain point it talks about change of basis to go from polar to Cartesian coordinates and vice versa. It gives the following relations: ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

Adding rotations onto a vector

I have a vector with spherical co-ordinates $(r_1,\theta_1,\phi_1)$, then I want this vector to be rotated by $\theta_2$ $\phi_2$ spherical angles but I cannot figure out how. I have tried using the ...
2
votes
2answers
448 views

Local inertial coordinates/Fermi normal coordinates

It is said that we can introduce local inertial coordinates/Fermi normal coordinates for any timelike geodesic. But why only for timelike geodesics? What about null geodesics? Perhaps it has to do ...
1
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0answers
125 views

Free fall coordinates/Fermi (normal) coordinates

It makes sense intuitively given the equivalent principle, and I've seen many times it stated, that for a free fall (geodesic) path in an arbitrary spacetime, we can choose our coordinate system to ...
1
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1answer
49 views

A particular coordinate transformation of a metric tensor

So, this was a problem set question for my GR class due yesterday, and I can't for the life of me solve it, it seems I am missing something very trivial. Either the given answer is wrong, or I am. ...
1
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1answer
63 views

Why is $\mathbb{R}^1$ different than Euclidean space $\mathbb{E}^1$? Roger Penrose road to reality

In Roger's book, the following is stated: (I'm paraphrasing because my book is in spanish) "We consider time as part of a space, namely $\mathbb{E}^1$, instead of it just being a copy of the line ...
2
votes
4answers
102 views

Why is coordinate time frame dependent? [duplicate]

Here is what I understand by coordinate time. It is the time difference measured between two events, using two synchronized clocks, one present at each event, and the difference is measured in an ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

Plane-polar coordinates [closed]

I have to make a presentation about them (7 minutes long) and I was wondering in what projects where they used. Like real life application of Plane-polar coordinate system.
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Degrees of Freedom for an Asymmetric top

How many degrees of freedom does an asymmetric top have if it is rotating about a fixed point?What are the generalised coordinates used then?
0
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0answers
118 views

Covariant Derivative Chain rule? [duplicate]

I want to prove that a covariant derivative of a vector $A^{\mu}(x(z))$ at the point $x(z)$ in general would be defined as $$D_z ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

When an object moves downward, is its height negative?

The question is: A ball is thrown directly downward with an initial speed of 8.00m/s from a height of 30.0m. After what time interval does it strike the ground. So I went through the problem ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

Is metric tensor invariant under rotation?

It is said that metric tensor depend on the local coordinate system and therefore are not intrinsic to the surface of an 3d-object? How is it possible, kindly provide any proof or discussion. Also is ...
1
vote
2answers
466 views

What is the physical meaning of the Eddington - Finkelstein coordinates?

I want to see a some physical process (experimental) that could explain the many transformations of coordinates into this mathematical procedure. (really two transformations, but i think that is a ...
2
votes
3answers
209 views

Two-rotation coordinate transformation

I've designed an electronic device that uses a 3-axis accelerometer to measure the acceleration of an automobile. I'm only interested in accelerations in the plane of the road surface, so I want to ...
2
votes
1answer
260 views

Trajectory of a photon around a Schwarzschild black hole?

Consider a photon coming from the infinity in a unbounded orbit to a Schwarzschild black hole (Schwarzschild radius $r_{s}$) (see this for illustration). Its impact parameter is $b$ and its distance ...