-2
votes
2answers
38 views

How to know the Direction of the Acceleration Vector?

If the exercise doesn't give you the direction, how to know the correct one? Sometimes I assume its to the right and it was actually to the left, and I get everything wrong. Example here: How can I ...
-1
votes
1answer
73 views

Prove one of the following trajectories is circular

In his classical mechanics lecture, Prof Susskind gives a short exercise, which I "feel" is very simple, but don't know where to start with. The question is: "There is a coordinate system ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Heliocentric Worldview [duplicate]

Isn't the whole historic Discussion of Heliocentric vs. Geocentric Worldview just about a Calculation-Technique. I mean I could also choose my coordinate-center to be in the middle of Earth and setup ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Expression of kinetic energy in polar coordinates

Expression for kinetic energy in Cartesian coordinate: Expression for kinetic energy in polar coordinate (applying the transformation of coordinates): Why can't we express it in the following ...
2
votes
2answers
63 views

Velocity in a turning reference frame

I often see the relation that $\vec v=\vec v_0+ \vec \omega \times \vec r$ in a turning reference frame, but where does it actually come from and how do I arrive at the acceleration being $$\vec ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Can we change frame of reference twice in a single problem?

My question has an inclined plane of mass $M$ and simple block kept on it, of mass $m$ (Both on a table). All surfaces are friction-less. Both of the objects would move, block down the incline and ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

How to get the angle needed for a projectile to pass through a given point for trajectory plotting [closed]

I am trying to find the angle needed for a projectile to pass-through a given point. Here is what I do know: Starting Point $(x_0,y_0)$ Velocity Pass-through point $(x_1, y_1)$ I also need to ...
2
votes
1answer
981 views

The trajectory of a projectile launched from a hilltop

Here is the problem: A boy stands at the peak of a hill which slopes downward uniformly at angle $\phi$. At what angle $\theta$ from the horizontal should he throw a rock so that it has the greatest ...
-1
votes
1answer
552 views

How do I express the Kepler general orbit $r(\phi)$ in rectangular coordinates?

How do I express the Kepler general orbit $r(\phi)$ in rectangular coordinates? I use the identities $x=r\cos\phi$, $y=r\sin\phi$, and $r^2 = x^2 + y^2$, but I block at some point.