Continuum mechanics is a branch of mechanics that deals with the analysis of the kinematics and the mechanical behavior of materials modeled as a continuous mass rather than as discrete particles.

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Continuum Wave Function for the electron

I'm trying to understand certain processes like the photoelectric effect and Bremsstrahlung. In Bremsstrahlung I need to use the wave function of an electron coming from the continuum, and there is ...
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25 views

Understanding incompressibility (of rubber or viscoelastic material)

Literature gives a lot of explanation why rubber is incompressible. However, I still need some thinking to understand physical behavior of rubber or any such material. Often, incompressibility is ...
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Dynamic mass or static mass?

I am testing a cantilever beam assuming it as a single degree of freedom system, therefore it can be described by the equation $$m_d \ddot{y}(d) + c_d \dot{y}(d) + k_d y(d) = p(t) $$ Where $d$ is ...
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122 views

Degree of anisotropy of crystal tensors

Does there exist a scalar that can describe how anisotropic the elasticity of a crystal is? What about other tensors such as the permittivity or susceptibility? I found a Wikipedia article that was ...
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Golf ball impact

A golf ball is said to be "compressed" when hit by a golf club and makes a characteristic "thwack-hiss" sound coming off of the club when impacted by professional golfers (whose impact conditions have ...
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1answer
106 views

Stress Force - Understanding Cauchy Stress Tensor

I've been trying to understand the derivation for the Cauchy Momentum Equation for so long now, and there is one part that every derivation glides over very quickly with practically no explanation ...
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143 views

Hookes Law and Objective Stress Rates

Often, in papers presenting updated Lagrangian simulation methods for solid dynamics, the following procedure for updating the (Cauchy) stress tensor is presented: First, the Cauchy stress tensor is ...
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1answer
25 views

Airfoils contradict the law of the lever?

The law of the lever says that "the less force you use, the more distance you have". It is often exemplified by referring to simple machines, but it should apply to all technical systems. But I do not ...
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25 views

Meaning of boundary conditions in solid mechanics

The Question is: A uniform horizontal beam OA, of length $a$ and weight $w$ per unit length is clamped horizontally at O and freely supported at A. The transverse displacement $y$ of the beam is ...
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373 views

Explain $\rho_{0}\dot{e} - \bf{P}^{T} : \bf{\dot{F}}+\nabla_{0} \cdot \bf{q} -\rho_{0}S = 0$

I am trying to understand the balance of energy -law from continuum mechanics, fourth law here. Could someone break this a bit to help me understand it? From chemistry, I can recall $$dU = \partial Q ...
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Can $U_{ij}$ or $v_{ij}$ in continuum mechanics be negative?

In continuum mechanics, we have the deformation gradient $\mathbf F$ to be: $$d\mathbf x = \mathbf F d \mathbf X$$ And then, we do a polar decomposition (A good reference here would be ...
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Estimate the persistence length of a rubber band [closed]

Not much more to say here, it's all in the question. The best, most convincing estimate will be chosen as the correct answer. EDIT: Assume the rubber band is at room temperature, with thickness $t$ ...
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Relation between area elements in finite deformation theory (continuum mechanics)

There are relations for the line and volume elements in continuum mechanics. For example: \begin{align} \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \frac{V}{V_0}&={\rm det}(F)\tag{1}\\ \lambda^2&=(F^TFe_1\cdot ...
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34 views

Deriving general boundary conditions from first principles for elastodynamic scattering

It seems that most of the relevant books only give the linear case and the rest say something along the lines of "here are common examples of boundary conditions." What are the most general boundary ...
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1answer
216 views

Equations of motion of displacement field

We have an action: $$S[\boldsymbol{u}] = \frac{1}{2} \int dt \int d^3x \left\{ \mu (\frac{\partial u_{i}}{\partial t})^{2} - \nu (u_{ii})^{2} - \rho(u_{ij})^{2}\right\} $$ Where $u_{ij} = ...
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1answer
22 views

Problem on bending plates in Newtonian Mechanics?

I am reading a book on interesting physics problems and demonstrations. One of the problems in the section on buildings, structures and equilibrium talks about a plate with one side attached to the ...
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2answers
33 views

On the isotropy of materials

Good morning. I am working on Honeycomb structures and first of all I would like to understand whether it is Isotropic or not, and , if the latter holds which kind of anisotropy it has. How to do it? ...
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Symmetry of the $3\times 3$ Cauchy Stress Tensor

When presenting the stress tensor (say in a non-relativistic context), it is shown to be a tensor in the sense that it is a linear vector transformation: it operates on a vector $n$ (the normal to a ...
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55 views

Find the maximum allowable bending moment

A rolled steel universal I-section beam with a serial size of $406\times178$ has a mass of $60$kg/m. What is the maximum safe allowable bending moment this beam can sustain,given that the maximum ...
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4answers
186 views

Particles scattering on fluids: breakdown of the effective continuum description

When does the macroscopic continuum description of a medium like a fluid break down? Say I'm interested in a scattering process of some particles with momentum $p$ and energy $E$ off a fluid of ...
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1answer
77 views

Physics of Wrinkling: Understanding inextensibility condition

I'm reading this very cool paper on the formation of wrinkles in elastic materials. The key result of the paper is a set of scaling laws for the amplitude and wavelength of wrinkles based on the ...
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2answers
783 views

what is difference between homogeneous vs isotropic material?

When we say a material is isotropic? When properties such as density, Young's modulus etc. are same in all directions. If these properties are direction dependent, then we can say that the material is ...
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54 views

Is there a way to calculate strain energy based on stress and deformation gradient?

We know that we can obtain stress from strain energy density and deformation gradient, for example: $$\mathbf P=\frac{\partial W}{\partial \mathbf F}$$ However, is there a way to calculate $W$ from ...
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Is there any viscoelastic model directly specified from strain energy function?

For most models I've seen, including the classic quasi-linear viscoelastic model, the parallel network viscoelastic model ABAQUS uses, and the model described in Holzapfel & Gasser 2000, they all ...
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27 views

Like viscoelastic polymers, why there are not storage and loss moduli for cast iron?

Viscoelastic polymers have different paths upon loading and unloading, so there is energy dissipation, so they have storage and loss moduli. Plastic behavior is also shown by cast iron: loading and ...
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Superior attachment of Möbius strip

In this DIY project, the Möbius strip is used to make a spill-proof coffee cup carrier. The author uses a Möbius strip as the handle of this carrier and says If you attach a Möbius strip to an ...
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1answer
87 views

How to define the heat current in an isotropic continuum material

I'm doing a FDTD (finite difference time domain) simulation of an isotropic continuum material. And I have several questions. How do you define the energy transferred through an isotropic continuum ...
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313 views

Prove Poisson's Ratio is 0.5 [closed]

Poisson's ratio is the negative ratio of the transverse strain (_T) to the axial strain (_A). For an incompressible (density doesn't change), homogeneous (everything is the same molecule), ...
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1answer
159 views

Divergence of Cauchy Stress Tensor

On the wikipedia page for the Cauchy Momementum Equation, it's stated that the equation can be written as $$\rho \frac{D\,\textbf{v}}{D\,t} = \nabla \cdot \sigma + \textbf{f}$$ Where $\sigma$ is ...
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108 views

Confusion in Euler-Bernoulli beam theory

Euler-Bernoulli beam equation is given by $$ EI \frac{\mathrm d^2 u}{\mathrm d x^2} = M'(x) \\ EI \frac{\mathrm d u}{\mathrm d x} = xM'(x) + C_1 $$ Where, $E$ is modulus, $I$ is second moment of ...
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1answer
165 views

Derivation of normal shear stress

I am self-studying this note and I am stuck in the derivation of the normal shear stress. Specifically I can't see how the relations (23) and (24) come about. Specifically, what I don't understand is ...
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2answers
853 views

How many atoms exist within a continuum body?

Materials, such as solids, liquids and gases, are composed of molecules separated by "empty" space. On a microscopic scale, materials have cracks and discontinuities. However, certain physical ...
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448 views

Boundary conditions of Navier-Cauchy equation

I'm having difficulties with Neumann boundary conditions in Navier-Cauchy equations (a.k.a. the elastostatic equations). The trouble is that if I rotate a body then Neumann boundary condition should ...
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Tensorial version of Hooke's law

It is well known that $${\boldsymbol F} = k {\boldsymbol x}$$ for isotropic media. Also, according to Wikipedia $$F_k = k_{jk} x_j$$ for some elastic tensor $k_{jk}$. I'm a bit confused as to how ...
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Rotate a long bar in space and get close to (or even beyond) the speed of light $c$

Imagine a bar spinning like a helicopter propeller, At $\omega$ rad/s because the extremes of the bar goes at speed $$V = \omega * r$$ then we can reach near $c$ (speed of light) applying some ...
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52 views

Stress in horizontal bars

Imagine we have an horizontal bar. My teacher expresses the tensions along the longitudinal axis by this way $\sigma_{xx}=A(x)y+B(x)$ He doesn't give any motivation behind this. So, is this general? ...
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What is the functional shape assumed by a flexible rod?

Be L a flexible rod. Say that it is very difficult to significantly stretch it, so that we can uniquely identify a point on it by a parameter $l \in [0, L]$ where $L$ is its length. Be $C$ a set of ...
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Determine particle velocity from density function

I'm modeling a 1D system which consists of a large number of discrete particles distributed on a line. As a continuous approximation, I'm defining $c(x,t)$ to be the space density function of these ...
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2answers
81 views

Why only vertical component of the stress tensor on vertically suspended bar?

EDIT: I am gonna rephrase the question entirely. Imagine we have a bar which we will analyze in the linear elastic regime. The shape of the cross section is irrelevant. The bar is suspended from a ...
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1answer
185 views

Why plane stress condition is taken for thin plates

Why plane stress is taken for thin plates? It says in the books that the stress variation is small for thin components and is close to zero. Why is that so? Also why stress at free surface is zero? ...
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262 views

Relationship between the continuity equation and the wave equation

What exactly is the relationship between the continuity equation and the wave equation? Suppose $J^\mu$ is a contravariant vector that satisfies the continuity equation $\partial_\mu J^\mu=0$. Let ...
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How wide does a wall of ice need to be to stay in place?

Let us say that we have unlimited manpower to construct a huge wall of water ice e.g. 200 m tall (700 feet). -and that the wall is placed in a climate, where the temperature never (for your purpose) ...
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67 views

Curve of a rod bent by force on both sides

Suppose we have a flexible rod (i.e. it can be bent without breaking apart) and we excert a force on both sides, like this: If the force $F$ is not exactly horizontal, the rod will be bent and form ...
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In continuum mechanics, what is work potential in the context of total potential energy?

I'm reading a book on the finite element method. Specifically I'm looking at the background material where they are discussing potential energy, equilibrium, and the Rayleigh–Ritz method. The book ...
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180 views

Can Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) be used to simulate porous media flow and deformation?

I am trying to use Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to study fluid flow in and around porous media. The aim is to observe how it causes erosion and failure. For this, from my understanding, there ...
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What is the “discrete” analogue to “continuum” mechanics?

If I wanted to explore a discrete mathematics approach to continuum mechanics, what textbooks should I look into? I suppose a ready answer to the question might be: "computational continuum ...
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buckling of tube - shell thickness vs. momentum of inertia optimum

is there any simple formula (perhabs semi emperical, or aproximatively derived model) for buckling of tube under axial compression load given its crossection and wall thickness? ( and naturraly ...
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Why can't a piece of paper (of non-zero thickness) be folded more than $N$ times?

Updated: In order to fold anything in half, it must be $\pi$ times longer than its thickness, and that depending on how something is folded, the amount its length decreases with each fold differs. ...
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Why are stresses of continuum systems described via a tensor?

The tittle pretty much says enough. I have always been told so but no one really motivated it. So, I would like to know why do we use a tensor to describe the stresses in continuum mechanics.
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153 views

Solid-body rotation of fluid in polar coordinates: How to compute the stress tensor

In a course on continuum mechanics, we are given an exercise concerning solid-body rotation of a fluid in polar coordinates. In the first parts (feel free to correct any errors here) we are tasked ...