The statement that a property of a system does not change if the system is isolated.

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570 views

Two dimensional elastic collisions with varying angle of incident

If in an elastic collision I know all initial values and that mass for each object remains constant throughout the collision (but different from one another) how can I determine their final velocity ...
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1answer
157 views

Quantum violation of Newton's Third Law? [closed]

From this site: http://www.learning-mind.com/5-thought-provoking-quantum-experiments-showing-that-reality-is-an-illusion/ I gained the knowledge that a group of scientists, upon measuring a tiny ...
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2answers
160 views

In the time of the dinosaurs the Earth rotated once in 17 hours rather than about 24 hours, where did the rotational energy and angular momentum go?

where did the rotational energy and angular momentum go? Some claim that the angular momentum went to the Moon. Astronauts put a corner reflecting mirror on the moon and reflected a Laser and timed ...
2
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0answers
251 views

Collision of Discs and Snooker Kicks

I woke up this morning thinking about spinning discs. Could someone verify whether my reasoning below is correct? Problem 1 Suppose have two identical uniform discs constrained to move in a plane. ...
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4answers
13k views

Why do electrons, according to my textbook, exist forever?

Does that mean that electrons are infinitely stable? The neutrinos of the three leptons are also listed as having a mean lifespan of infinity.
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4answers
274 views

Thermodynamics thought experiment

There is some ideal gas in a container moving with some velocity on a smooth surface and you suddenly stop it( say by using your hands) , will the temperature of the gas increase? It seems to me that ...
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2answers
280 views

can kinetic energy be independent of mass.?

Why is it said that the kinetic energy acquired by a body of after traveling a fixed distance from rest under the action of constant force is independent of mass? Nd yeah the mass of the body is ...
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1answer
267 views

Newton's Third law of motion: A hammer hits a wall vs. hits a tire

When we hit the wall by a hammer, Newton’s third law says that hammer applies force on the wall (action) and wall applies force on hammer (reaction) equal in magnitude but opposite in direction ok ...
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1answer
67 views

Newton's law for rigid bodies

Is newton's third law valid for rigid bodies? Say, if we have a bullet hit on a rod which is vertically placed on a rough floor. Friction is just sufficient sp that the rod rotates and does not slide....
2
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1answer
272 views

Charge conservation in the complex Klein-Gordon Field

This is an extremely naive question (based on a knowledge of chapter 2 of peskin and schroeder) so apologies for any things that seem obvious. The complex scalar field, when quantized, has a conserved ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Can conservation of momentum be violated?

The law of the conservation of momentum has been established for hundred of years. Even in Quantum field theory every particle collision must be momentum-conserving if there is homogenity in space. ...
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3answers
365 views

Constants of motion in quantum mechanics

What is the meaning of a constant of motion in quantum mechanics (an observable-operator that commutes with the Hamiltonian) in contrary with classical mechanics?
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1answer
272 views

Shooting a bullet at a system of blocks [closed]

So, I made this question up myself.... and I'm curious about the answer. It requires only secondary-school-level knowledge of physics: You have a surface (ground) with a certain coefficient of ...
1
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1answer
262 views

First-order EM Feynman diagram?

Is there any 1st order electromagnetic Feynman diagram? I.e. a process whose probability is just $\propto \alpha_{EM}$? If not, is there any physical reason why? We always need at least two particles ...
3
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1answer
66 views

What justifies conservation laws in non-uniform spatial/temporal fields, if Noether's theorem doesn't?

Noether's theorem is based on the assumption that the Lagrangian is independent of position/time/angle/etc. Does this mean it doesn't prove, for example, conservation of momentum in a gravitational ...
3
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1answer
212 views

How did Feynman prove that energy cannot be extracted from electric field?

In the Feynman Lectures, vol. II, chapter 4, Feynman discusses electric potential and says: If we carry a charge from point $a \to b$, $$W = -\int_{a}^{b} \mathbf{F} \cdot ds.$$ Now, in general, ...
3
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3answers
288 views

Confusion regarding rotational motion!

Let us assume I have a rod of some mass m, moment of inertia I, length l and center C. If I apply a force F on C for a duration of time t, it will accelerate forward. If I apply it elsewhere, the ...
0
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1answer
112 views

Difference between speed of light and of bullet after passing through a barrier [duplicate]

I just read that, when a ray of light traveling in vacuum at $c$ strikes a glass slab, its speed decreases and then when it re-emerges it gets back to its original speed i.e $c$. If I draw a ...
0
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1answer
137 views

Using Conservation of momentum and Energy to solve a problem [closed]

A 9kg bullet is fired horizontally into a 10 kg block of wood suspended by a rope from the ceiling. The block swings in an arc, rising 6mm above its lowest position. Find the velocity of the bullet. ...
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6answers
2k views

Is (rest) mass conserved in special relativity?

I don't understand why it is said that the (rest) mass of a system is not conserved in relativity. I mean, the momentum of a system is conserved (i.e.: it remains constant in a frame of reference ...
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4answers
103 views

Sun and planets orbit each other

Do not the planets and the Sun revolve in orbits around each other and the shape of the orbit depends on where the center of gravity of the system is? The greater the mass of the Sun, the closer the ...
10
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3answers
2k views

Does a particle annihilate only with its antiparticle? If yes, why?

Or to put the question another way - what is the result of a proton-positron collision, or an up quark-charm antiquark collision, etc.? As far as I know, annihilation happens only between particles of ...
2
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1answer
105 views

Pair-annihilation why does it occour? [duplicate]

Why does pair annihilation occur with particles and only their matching anti-particle? E.g., electrons and positrons, but not protons and positrons? What is the difference?
3
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2answers
115 views

Why is $p_\phi$ conserved in a Schwarzschild orbit?

This arises from the question What is the relationship between $a$ and $m$, which I'm afraid I answered just by looking it up in Schutz's book. However Schutz (as he frequently does) glosses over ...
5
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1answer
435 views

Why can't Compton scattering happen in leading order of perturbation theory?

Why is the matrix element of Compton scattering in leading order of perturbation theory equal to zero? Why can this process only be described in second order of perturbation theory, i.e. with exchange ...
1
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1answer
425 views

Collisions between an object and a wall

Is momentum conserved when an object bounces back against a wall? The wall doesn’t move, but the object moves in the opposite direction. Assume this is an ideal, elastic collision. If, initially, the ...
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1answer
1k views

Kepler problem in time: how do two gravitationally attracted particles move? [duplicate]

Two particles with initial positions and velocities $r_1,v_1$ and $r_2,v_2$ are interacting by the inverse square law (with G=1), so that $$ {d^2r_1\over dt^2} = - { m_2(r_1-r_2)\over |r_1-r_2|^3} $$ ...
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1answer
62 views

Two Bodies Orbiting Around Each Other and Kepler’s Laws?

If two bodies are orbiting around a central center of gravity, how does Kepler’s first law (the one regarding the ellipse) apply?
0
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2answers
159 views

Comparing the orbit radius of two spherical objects [duplicate]

Assume the mass of star 2 is 4 times the mass of star 1. Compare the radius of the orbit of star 1 to that of star 2. Possible answers: R1:R2=1:4 R1:R2=1:2 R1:R2=2:1 R1:R2=4:1 R1:R2=16:1 ...
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2answers
65 views

Eulerian mass conservation on a stream line to Lagrangian mass conservation

if the density of a fluid particle is conserved on a streamline, $$\frac{d\rho}{dt}=0.$$ Why does this mean $$\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial t}+(\mathbf{v}\cdot\nabla)\rho=0$$ is true everywhere? Why ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Do all “normal” black holes rotate?

Can we assume that most (if not all) black holes are rotating, due to conservation of momentum? I am excluding the micro world from this question, just thinking of the range of stars on the main ...
1
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2answers
715 views

Can gyroscope work in zero gravity?

Most ships have two or more gyroscopes to balance on water, man made satellites uses gyroscope for orientation as they fall around earth. All these applications seems to be associated with gravity, ...
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2answers
328 views

Conservation of angular momentum in a planetary system

Why is angular momentum conserved when a planet revolves about sun in an elliptical orbit? Why is linear momentum not conserved in this case? Please use the minimum amount of equations and try to ...
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1answer
76 views

Continuity Equation for Momentum

Momentum is a conserved quantity, which makes me wonder if we can write an equation for the local conservation of momentum in the form of a continuity equation. If we're considering a system of ...
3
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1answer
220 views

Physics simulator based on conservation laws?

Reading the article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton%27s_laws_of_motion#Relationship_to_the_conservation_laws there's a section stating that: ...
25
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5answers
13k views

Is it possible to shoot bullets in space or would the recoil of the gun be too strong?

I've read a few articles that say that astronauts have already brought guns in space and that shooting bullets in space is possible. But won't the recoil of the gun be too strong? Law of ...
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3answers
347 views

What is actually a conservation law?

Though in his lectures, Feynman didn't define conservation law, he did use it while explaining divergence theorem: [...] heat is conserved. That is, no heat is generated inside the material and ...
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5answers
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Elastic collision of point particle and rod

A 1 meter long rod on the ice with mass $m_2=1$ kg is perpendicularly hit on one end by a point particle with mass $m_1=0.1$ kg. The collision is elastic and the point particle is bounced back in the ...
2
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0answers
80 views

Antimatter universe and Noether's theorem

I am studying Feynman's "symmetry in physical laws", where he talks about conservation laws for corresponding symmetries. (I know this is Noether's theorem, I am studying this from David Tong's ...
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0answers
26 views

Interpretation of Mass Continuity Equation in MHD [duplicate]

I'm writing up my final-year dissertation and I'm required to give, as part of the introduction, an analysis of all the equations (and their terms) of which I use. Embarrassingly, whilst of course ...
0
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1answer
99 views

Why is $\int_{s} \mathbf{h}\cdot \mathbf{n} da = - \dfrac{dQ}{dt}$ & not $\int_{s} \mathbf{h} \cdot\mathbf{n} da = - \dfrac{dQ}{dt} .{dt}$?

I was reading the Lectures of Feynman about surface integral where a situation in which heat is conserved has been dealt. Let there be $Q$ heat energy present inside a body. Now, if there is net heat ...
2
votes
1answer
155 views

Finding final velocity in inelastic collision [closed]

Information: In a shipping company distribution center, an open cart of mass 49.0-kg is rolling to the left at a speed of 5.40-m/s (see the figure). You can ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Time evolution of generalized angular momentum operator

We define this operator : $$M^{\mu\nu} = \int d^3x~(x^{\mu}T^{0\nu} - x^{\nu}T^{0\mu})$$ where $T_{\mu\nu}$ is the energy momentum tensor (see e.g. Energy momentum tensor from Noether's theorem) ...
7
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1answer
608 views

How does the divergence theorem justify the integral form of the continuity equation?

I vaguely understand the continuity equation (at least its integral form), but I don't really understand the differential form of the continuity equation. I'm having trouble understanding how to ...
0
votes
1answer
653 views

Continuity equation in fluid mechanics

The continuity equation in fluid mechanics states that $$ \frac{\partial\rho}{\partial t} + \nabla\cdot(ρ\mathbf u)=0 $$ Can you explain to me what is the physical meaning of each term of the ...
1
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1answer
414 views

What is the definition of parity conservation?

I searched quite hard, and am still confused what is the exact definition of parity conservation? For example, we have quantum system with initial state $\Phi_i$, and after decaying it comes to final ...
0
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2answers
158 views

Two balls travelling at different speeds collide in two referentials

In a referential R1, one ball B1 travels at 100 m/s and hits and another identitcal ball B2 that travels at 50 m/s in the same direction. Assuming the material in which the balls are made is such that ...
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1answer
428 views

Conservation of angular momentum in a free rod

When a collision is elastic and no external torque acts on a system, angular momentum is conserved I found this example and checked the results: A ball (m = 1 Kg , v = p =+22 m/s, Lm = +11, Ke = 242 ...
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3answers
2k views

The momentum of a swinging sword

Suppose you are faced with a zombie, and the only way to kill it and save yourself is to chop its head off with your sword. However, you are very weak from illness, and can only afford to strike once. ...
0
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1answer
274 views

Calculation of velocity via kinetic energy and momentum yielding different answer

I am attacking the given problem (as a preface I'm not asking to be spoon fed any answers, just looking for clarity from people much smarter than myself) A 15.0kg block is attached to a very light ...