The statement that a property of a system does not change if the system is isolated.

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4answers
102 views

Can conservation of momentum and conservation of energy explain every possible event in the Universe?

I heard my friend, a researcher, say that we can, in theory, explain every event happening in the universe using the Conservation of momentum and energy. He added that we may not be able to do that ...
1
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1answer
587 views

On the origin of the rotation of celestial bodies [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why does Venus rotate the opposite direction as other planets? Why does every thing spin? As far as I can imagine, almost each celestial body, star, planet, ...
5
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6answers
911 views

Why does the Earth rotate? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why does every thing spin? So why would the Earth, or any planet for that matter, rotate along an axis? I know of no force which could come into play here, so i assume ...
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0answers
20 views

Reason behind the rotation of Earth? [duplicate]

I want to know what is the reason that the Earth rotates on its own axis? What are the forces responsible for the Earth's rotation?
14
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4answers
993 views

NASA's “Impossible” Space Engine

Recently, there was some news that said that the researchers at NASA have come across some impossible kind of space engine which does not require any fuel. I have read at a few places like here, here ...
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1answer
112 views

What's the point of NASA's impossible space engine? Wouldn't a mirror work better?

My understanding (which is very little) is that the point of NASA's recent virtual-particle engine is to convert solar energy into momentum. That's fine, but what's the point? If the spacecraft is ...
1
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0answers
75 views

$G$-parity in an electromagnetic decay

I am looking at the decay $\eta\rightarrow\pi^+\pi^-\gamma$ and I would assume that the decay itself (ignoring the $\pi\pi$ final state interaction that is obviously strong) is electromagnetic since ...
9
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1answer
190 views

How can a planet gravitationally capture objects?

I would expect that any asteroid or other object originating far away but passing near a planet would pick up speed and energy as it approaches, but unless it comes into contact with the atmosphere ...
1
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1answer
69 views

Integrals of Motion for s Degrees of Freedom

From Landau & Lifshitz, Classical Mechanics, the number of integrals of independent integrals of motion for a system of $s$ degrees of freedom is $2s-1$. I am considering a spherical pendulum in ...
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2answers
114 views

Particle number conservation equals $U(1)$-symmetry?

If have by now frequently read the above but never really understood it. It is said that the particle number conservations is related to the phase of the wave function, but how?
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2answers
435 views

A spring with two masses in an inelastic collision

An ideal spring is attached to a wall, and the other end is attached to a mass $m$. The spring is initially compressed a distance $x$. After it is released, the mass collides with another mass $2m$ ...
0
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1answer
104 views

Conserved current for a constant translation of a free massless scalar field

In Zinn-Justin's Quantum Field Theory and Critical Phenomena they start with an action for a free massless scalar field: $$S(\varphi) = \frac{1}{2}\int ...
2
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2answers
210 views

Conservation laws and continuity equations

I'm a bit messed up with conservation laws and continuity equations. This is my understanding: A conservation law describes that a physical quantity $G$ is conserved with time. It does not prevent ...
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1answer
92 views

Relativistic Conservation laws [closed]

Conservation of Relativistic mass and thus energy is easily proven by considering an inelastic collision of two bodies while invoking the conservation of momentum. As such the momentum law appears ...
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0answers
25 views

Relationship of multiple particles under collision [closed]

Consider 3 particles. All 3 particles travel along the x-axis. The 1st particle possesses some mass, m, and its initial position is somewhere on the negative x-axis. It contains some (positive) ...
2
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2answers
170 views

Will I be able to push a small object in front of me in the outer space?

Imagine I am standing on Earth, and pushing a tennis ball away from me. The ball moves. If it is very heavy, I will move back instead of the ball. Now consider the same scenario in outer space, where ...
5
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3answers
988 views

Conservation of linear and angular momentum

Suppose I have two rigid bodies A and B and they are connected by a spring which is attached off-center (thus possibly causing torques). Due to the spring a force $f$ acts on A and a force $-f$ acts ...
3
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1answer
69 views

Relationship of multiple particles under collision [closed]

Consider 3 particles. All 3 particles travel along the x-axis. The 1st particle possesses some mass, m, and its initial position is somewhere on the negative x-axis. It has some (positive) velocity ...
2
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1answer
194 views

Conservation of linear momentum, when is it conserved?

Will Linear momentum be conserved in a non-inertial frame of reference? In other words what is the fundamental condition for linear momentum to be conserved? Also which is more fundamental- Newton's ...
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2answers
117 views

The charm of the gyroscope [closed]

I am fascinated by the gyroscope, like everyboy who was so lucky as to get such a toy as a kid. But probably also grown-ups are not immune to its charm. I am not asking for a theoretical explanation. ...
2
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1answer
278 views

Angular momentum, what is it, is it conserved, and how do we know?

Firstly, most definitions of angular momentum assume a point about which you define angular momentum. I realize that you can consider the angular momentum about any point, and have many angular ...
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3answers
648 views

Is it possible to deduce the conservation of angular momentum from the conservation of energy?

Is it possible to deduce the law of conservation of angular momentum from the law of conservation of energy? If possible, by what sense the conservation of angular momentum has the status of law, if ...
2
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5answers
518 views

Is the canonical momentum conserved when a particle moves in magnetic field?

Here is a question about the canonical momentum that I had asked some days ago, but I still have one point that I am not understand. Considering a particle moves in a magnetic field with charge $q$ ...
2
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3answers
8k views

Kinetic energy and momentum conservation in an explosion?

My physics book says, "A firecracker sliding on ice has the same total momentum before and after it explodes." I understand this part. This is because of Newton's 3rd law, and no external forces. This ...
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0answers
65 views

Conserved charge from conserved current associated with translational invariance

(c.f Di Francesco, 'Conformal Field Theory' P.45) Di Francesco calls the conserved charge arising from the conserved current associated with a translation invariant theory the 'four momentum'. While ...
5
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1answer
277 views

Relationship between the continuity equation and the wave equation

What exactly is the relationship between the continuity equation and the wave equation? Suppose $J^\mu$ is a contravariant vector that satisfies the continuity equation $\partial_\mu J^\mu=0$. Let ...
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8answers
17k views

How can momentum but not energy be conserved in an inelastic collision?

In inelastic collisions, kinetic energy changes, so the velocities of the objects also change. So how is momentum conserved in inelastic collisions?
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1answer
50 views

Angular Momentum Conservation Definition [duplicate]

Did I missed something in angular momentum definition? Two identical bodies rotate around mass center. Now I invented anti-gravity and turning gravitational switch off. Those two bodies will move now ...
4
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1answer
257 views

Crystal Momentum in a Periodic Potential

I'm working through some basic theory on periodic potentials, and I would appreciate help in understanding the crystal momentum. Suppose we have a Bravais lattice with lattice vectors $\textbf{R}$. ...
4
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1answer
105 views

When I move my arm forward in vacuum, will my body move backward?

Let's say I stay at point $x=0$ in vacuum. When I move my arm forward such that it will have a positive $x$ position (say $x=5$) will the rest of my body move backward such that it will have a ...
2
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1answer
50 views

Deriving conserved currents by promoting parameter

I currently reading Tong's text on String Theory. In Chapter 4.1.1 he alludes to a technique to derive conserved currents Recall that we can usually derive conserved currents by promoting the ...
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2answers
171 views

If a ball spinning on a rod hits another ball, what is conserved linear or angular momentum?

Suppose a 1-kg ball A is fixed to a spoke 0.2 m long, which is attached to an axle so that the ball can rotate (v=10m/s, KE=50J, $\omega$=50 rps, L=2, p=0) Now, there is a second ball B (m=1kg), ...
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3answers
352 views

Does the the quantum field theoretic process of particle–antiparticle annihilation break the axioms of Special Relativity?

$\textbf{Note that this diagram hasn't anything to do with the question directly.}$ After a particle and its antiparticle annihilate, their energy is converted into a force carrier particle, such ...
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0answers
39 views

Gravitational force and time dilation [closed]

Suppose the radius of the earth is reduced by half but the mass is same, then how long will it take to complete one rotation, 24, 48, 12 or 6 h.? please give the mathematical relations and solution. ...
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2answers
12k views

Perfect elastic collision and velocity transfer

So my teacher told me that when you have two identical balls in a perfectly elastic collision, the first ball A will collide with B and afterwards A will stop and B continue. Why is this? Doesn't ...
2
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1answer
147 views

Finding direction of a ball after collision in cartesian coordinate system [closed]

In elastic collision of ball to wall along x axis m*Vix=m*Vfx as velocity of wall is 0 before and after collision thus Vix=Vfx ......eq(1) Kinetic Energy is conserved so m*Vi2 = m*Vf2 (Vix2 + ...
49
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6answers
3k views

Is there a way for an astronaut to rotate?

We know that if an imaginary astronaut is in the intergalactic (no external forces) and has an initial velocity zero, then he has is no way to change the position of his center of mass. The law of ...
2
votes
4answers
182 views

Turning on a straight, unbanked, frictionless road

I was learning about circular motion when this question struck me: In real life situations we are able to take a turn along a circular arc with our bike because friction provides us the necessary ...
2
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0answers
41 views

How obtain conserved quantities in integrable models in accordance with Liouville's theorem, via Sklyanin Poisson algebra?

In classical integrable models, in the discrete case we have the Sklyanin algebra, $$\lbrace T_{a}(u),T_{b}(v)\rbrace =[r_{ab}(u,v),T_{a}(u)T_{b}(v)].$$ How to prove that the conserved quantities are ...
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1answer
179 views

Conservation of energy and momentum via the continuity equation in asymmetric time and space translation

I am confused about energy and momentum conservation, time and space translation symmetry, and the continuity equation. Suppose we have a mass $m$ in inertial space far from any gravitational ...
3
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3answers
1k views

Is there more energy in the collapse of a cavitation bubble than the energy required to create the bubble in the first place?

The following does not include all scientific details and parameters, only a common summary of "thoughts". What is scientifically wrong with this summary? When you take your beer and tap the top ...
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2answers
13k views

Calculating force of impact

Since $\text{force = mass}\times\text{acceleration}$, is it right to say that an object traveling at a high constant velocity (zero acceleration), exerts zero force upon impact with a stationary ...
3
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0answers
66 views

What's the corresponding symmetry of enstrophy conservation?

In fluid mechanics, especially 2D turbulence study, people talk about conservation of enstrophy. But I can't really understand enstrophy very well, and what's the corresponding symmetry of enstrophy ...
1
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1answer
85 views

Please explain the flaw in this picture [duplicate]

So I saw this picture on my google+ feed and I immediately know why it wont work. But I'm having trouble explaining to myself and others exactly why. Without using anything overly complex, can anyone ...
7
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3answers
1k views

What determines whether a pool ball will bouce backwards after colliding with another pool ball?

I'm no knowledgeable pool player, but I've noticed that sometimes when the cue ball hits another pool ball, they roll together; and sometimes the cue ball bounces back. And I have a very, very rough ...
2
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4answers
468 views

How to calculate a collision which is partly elastic and partly inelastic?

(For the purpose of this question, "calculating a collision" means: given the velocities and masses of two objects in a collision, figuring out the new velocities of both objects after the collision). ...
8
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4answers
2k views

On what basis do we trust Conservation of Energy?

I'm happy to accept and use conservation of energy when I'm solving problems at Uni, but I'm curious about it to. For all of my adult life, and most of my childhood I've been told this law must hold ...
3
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4answers
435 views

Is the principle of Conservation of Energy empirically verifiable?

Before I am inundated by myriad and vociferous claims that conservation of energy is the single most well-attested and experimentally verified principle in all of science, let me say that I am well ...
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3answers
69 views

In Orbital Mechanics what is the quantity described below called?

I seem to recall that $r^2 \dot{\theta}$ is a conserved quantity in orbital mechanics, which I just proved using the Euler-Lagrange equations. Namely via: $ \mathcal{L} = \frac{m}{2} (\dot{r}^2+r^2 ...
2
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2answers
305 views

Lepton number conservation in standard model

Why is it said that in standard model lepton number is conserved? How do I know that Lepton number is an abelian charge? Why is this conservation not as sacred as electric charge conservation. How ...