The study of physical properties condensed phases of matter, including solids and liquids.

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Is ultradense deuterium real?

I've found several articles discussing experimental evidence of a deuterium state of densities over $140 \textrm{ kg}/\textrm{cm}^3$: F. Winterberg. Ultradense Deuterium. arXiv. Shahriar Badiei, ...
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1answer
220 views

Does anyone know the difference and relation between $k\cdot p$ method and tight binding (TB) method?

Among the methods of calculating energy bands for crystals, first-principles method is the most accurate. Besides first principles, two commonly used modeling methods are the $k\cdot p$ method and ...
4
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2answers
612 views

What happens when a bare 3d topological insulator is subject to a magnetic field?

Effective field theory of 3d topological insulators (TI) predict some novel electromagnetic effects. Unfortunately it require a gapped surface which is hard to achieve experimentally. Then I have two ...
7
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1answer
315 views

Can I integrate out the fermion field that is not gapped?

This piece of argument has been repeated again and again by experts, that is Since the fermions are gapped, then I can integrate it out. but I have no idea of what will happen if the fermions ...
3
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2answers
378 views

Very basic question about QFT at finite density

This must be the first question everyone asks when starting to study field theory at finite density and zero temperature. To introduce a finite density one adds a Lagrange multiplier which fixes the ...
8
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1answer
773 views

Counterexamples to the bulk-boundary correspondence (topological insulators)

In the literature on topological insulators and superconductors the 'bulk-boundary correspondence' features quite heavily. One version of this conjecture says roughly: "At an interface between two ...
16
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2answers
668 views

Is there a sound theoretical argument against inner-shell induced nuclear chain reactions?

There is a claim often made about cold fusion, that it is excluded theoretically. The main theoretical argument is that electronic energies are too low to overcome the Coulomb barrier, since d-d ...
7
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4answers
349 views

Intuitive explanation to why superconductivity breaks at high temperatures

I was recently caught up in a situation where I tried to explain to someone with only vary basic knowledge of physics (notion of atoms and electrons, etc.) what causes superconductivity. One thing I ...
2
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1answer
747 views

Calculating conductivity from Green's functions

I am trying to calculate the conductivity in the linear response regime of a disordered electron gas. (or eventually of a mean field Heavy fermion system with known one particle green's functions). I ...
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0answers
454 views

condensed matter physics must reads [closed]

Possible duplicate: Books for Condensed Matter Physics I'm looking to learn more about cutting edge research in condensed matter theory. I hope you'll help me find some recommended articles in ...
3
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1answer
275 views

How are quantum potential wells fabricated?

Potential wells, such as infinite and finite potential well, have been the standard examples in quantum mechanics textbooks for tens of years. They started being only theoretical toy models but as ...
3
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2answers
406 views

What are the applications of delta function potentials?

Are there real applications for using delta function potentials in quantum mechanics (other than using it as an exactly solvable toy model in introductory undergraduate quantum mechanics textbooks) ? ...
5
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2answers
373 views

In condensed matter simulations, how is particle number density computed in practice?

I have been reading a recent paper. In it, the authors performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of parallel-plate supercapacitors, in which liquid resides between the parallel-plate electrodes. ...
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2answers
211 views

What is the origin of nonconservative force?

My understanding about conservative force is a force that its work is independent of path such that we can construct another form of the work called potential to make our life easier. For friction, ...
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4answers
4k views

Why is the canonical ($NVT$) ensemble often used for (classical) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations?

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a common approach to the (classical) many-body problem. It relies on integration of Newton's equations of motion to simulate the trajectories of many (e.g., ...
2
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2answers
94 views

critical density to create macroscopic nuggets of nuclear matter

Is there a critical size that an hydrogen bomb detonation needs to have in order to produce neutron-degenerated matter? Does anyone knows if matter in this state would be stable at ambient ...
8
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2answers
283 views

Effect of boundary conditions on partition functions

While computing partition functions in statistical mechanics models (say) on a 2d lattice one usually makes use of "circular boundary conditions" which thus gives the lattice topology of a torus. It ...
6
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1answer
1k views

Temperature dependence of resistivity in metals

We know that in high temperature, resistivity in metals goes linearly with temperature. As temperature is lowered, resistivity goes first as $T^5$ due to "electron-phonon" interaction, and then goes ...
5
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1answer
218 views

Does there exist a nonrelativistic physical system in which the effective long-distance fields violate spin/statistics?

The nonrelativistic Schrodinger field allows spin independent of statistics, so that you can imagine a nonrelativistic Schrodinger scalar field with Fermionic statistics, or a Schrodinger spinor field ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Helicity and Pseudospin in Graphene

The Hamiltonian for graphene at $\vec{k}$ away from the $K$ point is proportional to $$ \vec{\sigma} \cdot \vec{k} =\begin{pmatrix} 0 & k_x - i k_y \\ k_x + i k_y & 0 \\ \end{pmatrix} = k ...
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1answer
394 views

Formation of the overlap in metal electron bands

I understand that metals have overlapping of valence and conduction bands. But is this because there exists a partial conduction band within the top part of a metal valence band, or because the ...
6
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1answer
194 views

Spin-ice materials with strong quantum fluctuations

Spin-ice materials are insulating materials where spins form a 3D pyrochlore lattice and have a frustrated magnetic interaction. The spin dynamics in most spin-ice materials is very classical and has ...
11
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2answers
3k views

Spontaneous Time Reversal Symmetry Breaking?

It is known that you can break P spontaneously--- look at any chiral molecule for an example. Spontaneous T breaking is harder for me to visualize. Is there a well known condensed matter system which ...
6
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1answer
410 views

Ground state degeneracy of a variation of Toric Code model

We know that the ground state degeneracy of Toric Code model is 4. An easy way of seeing this is the following: Consider a 2D spin model where all the spins live on the links. The Hamiltonian is ...
7
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1answer
888 views

Is resonating valence bond (RVB) states long-range entangled?

Quantum liquid is at the core of condensed matter theory study, examples include superfluid in Bose Hubbard model, quantum spin liquid around the RK point of a quantum dimer model, string-net ...
9
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1answer
509 views

How to determine if an emergent gauge theory is deconfined or not?

2+1D lattice gauge theory can emerge in a spin system through fractionalization. Usually if the gauge structure is broken down to $\mathbb{Z}_N$, it is believed that the fractionalized spinons are ...
11
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1answer
386 views

Quasi 1D insulators with strong spin-orbital interaction

We know that the spin-1 chain realizes the Haldane phase which is an example of symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases (ie short-range entangled phases with symmetry). The Haldane phase is ...
5
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0answers
299 views

Significance of Dirac cones in condensed matter physics

In condensed matter physics, Dirac cones can be found in graphene, topological insulators, cuprates, and iron-pnictides. This means that electrons behave as massless particles near the Dirac points. ...
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3answers
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Majorana zero mode in quantum field theory

Recently, Majorana zero mode becomes very hot in condensed matter physics. I remember there was a lot of study of fermion zero mode in quantum field theory, where advanced math, such as index ...
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10answers
4k views

What is spontaneous symmetry breaking in QUANTUM systems?

Most descriptions of spontaneous symmetry breaking, even for spontaneous symmetry breaking in quantum systems, actually only give a classical picture. According to the classical picture, spontaneous ...
3
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0answers
566 views

Goldstone modes and Heisenberg model

The ideia is to show that, because of Goldstone modes, 2d systems are quite different from 3d ones. So, considering the Heisenberg model, I'll post here what I'm asked to and my current thoughts on ...
6
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1answer
1k views

What is the relationship between string net theory and string / M-theory?

I've just learned from this one of Prof. Wen's answers that there exists a theory called string net theory. Since I've never heard about this before it picks my curiosity, so I`d like to ask some ...
5
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1answer
433 views

Graphene Moebius Strip

I'm refering to the Paper: PHYSICAL REVIEW B 80, 195310 (2009) "Möbius graphene strip as a topological insulator" Z. L. Guo, Z. R. Gong, H. Dong, and C. P. Sun. The paper is also available as a ...
3
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1answer
3k views

Which derivation of drift velocity is correct?

In the derivation of drift velocity I have seen two variations and want to know which one's correct. $s=ut+\frac{at^2}{2}$ Assume that the drift velocity of any electron in any conductor is : ...
4
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1answer
498 views

Helium-4 superfluidity and gauge symmetry breaking

Is there an accessible account of superfluidity in Helium-4 as a manifestation of "global gauge symmetry" breaking? And what is meant by "global gauge symmetry"? I was taught that gauge symmetries ...
5
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2answers
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Hit a bottle of beer on the top with another causes the first to spit all the gas, why?

So, on the other day me and my colleges were discussing the following phenomena: Pick two open bottles of beer. With the bottom of the first, hit the second on the bottleneck, in the following way: ...
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2answers
153 views

Reference needed for Iron-based superconductors

Iron-based superconductor is a class of high-$T_c$ superconductors discovered in 2008. Are there any review papers about these superconductors yet? If not, which are the key papers in the field?
3
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0answers
115 views

Qualitative argument to determine energy of defects

In a book of "LES HOUCHES - Critical Phenomena, Random systems, Gauge theories" the author Frolich says that: 2D In two dimensions, the mean energy of an isolated point defect in a square area of ...
9
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1answer
792 views

Interpretation of the Random Schrödinger Equation

I should preface this by admitting that my physics background is rather weak so I beg you to keep that in mind in your responses. I work in mathematics (specifically probability theory) and a paper ...
3
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1answer
177 views

How is the dynamic equilibrium nature of fermi-dirac distribution of particles facilitated?

I read this in Kittel: Introduction to Solid State Physics about deriving that product of electron and hole concentration as independent at a given temperature by the law of mass action. For this ...
5
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0answers
971 views

10 Big Problems - Condensed Matter [closed]

I think it was Feynman that suggested that you should always carry ten big problems around in your head, and when you encounter a new method, see whether this new method allows you to make progress on ...
2
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1answer
288 views

What is the difference between contact-limited and space-charge-limited charge transport?

I am reading a paper ("Tunable Electrical Conductivity of Individual Graphene Oxide Sheets Reduced at 'Low' Temperatures," Jung, et al. Nano Lett. 2008, 8, 4283-4287) about electrical conductivity in ...
3
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1answer
292 views

Fractional statistics

A common way to show that anyons exhibit fractional statistics in 2D is by arguing that the paths of two anyons winding round each other cannot be continuously deformed to zero. This seems to assume ...
4
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1answer
1k views

The Difference between Thomas-Fermi Screening and Lindhard Screening

Assuming the general theory of screening related to electron-electron interactions, I was wondering if anyone could provide a clear, yet conceptually complete explanation of the differences between ...
2
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3answers
602 views

Gauge invariance and form of the vacuum polarization tensor

In quantum field theory or condensed matter physics, the fermionic one-loop diagram gives rise to the polarization tensor $$ Π^{µν} = Tr[ γ^µ G γ^ν G ] $$ If we couple the electrons to an ...
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1answer
286 views

Relative Change of Volume

Simple question, in materials publications I often see the relative change of volume in a system reported as $$ \Delta \left (V \right )/V $$ is the denominator volume supposed to be initial or the ...
5
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3answers
1k views

Entanglement spectrum

What does it mean by the entanglement spectrum of a quantum system? A brief introduction and a few key references would be appreciated.
2
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2answers
1k views

Partially filled orbitals and strongly correlated electrons

Interesting behavior of strong correlation between electrons occur in metals with partially filled d or f orbitals (transition metals). Why these strong correlations do not appear with elements with ...
5
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1answer
809 views

Analytic continuation of imaginary time Greens function in the time domain

Consider the imaginary time Greens function of a fermion field $\Psi(x,τ)$ at zero temperature $$ G^τ = -\langle \theta(τ)\Psi(x,τ)\Psi^\dagger(0,0) - \theta(-τ)\Psi^\dagger(0,0)\Psi(x,τ) \rangle $$ ...
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1answer
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Tight Binding Model in Graphene

I'm following a calculation done by a guy who's done it a bit different than what I've done before (used nearest neighbour vectors and a DFT instead of what I will show below), I'm not quite sure how ...