6
votes
0answers
257 views

When can we take the Brillouin zone to be a sphere?

When reading some literatures on topological insulators, I've seen authors taking Brillouin zone(BZ) to be a sphere sometimes, especially when it comes to strong topological insulators. Also I've seen ...
3
votes
1answer
143 views

Diagonalization of Hamiltonian

Typically, one way of understanding the physics of an interacting quantum system is by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian. In principle, can we always diagonalize a Hamiltonian, such that it is expressed ...
7
votes
1answer
329 views

Topological insulators: why K-theory classification rather than homotopy classification?

I am reading a 2009 paper by Kitaev on K-theory classification of topological insulators. In the 4th page, 1st paragraph in the section "Classification principles", he says, Continuous ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Theorem of inclusion in the disordered Bose-Hubbard model

In a paper by V. Gurarie et al. , the theorem of inclusion is used to prove that there is no direct phase transition between Mott insulator and spuerfluid in presence of disorder. In Fig. 2 of that ...
2
votes
1answer
118 views

Ergodicity of the Drude model

The Drude model of electric conduction in solids deals with independent free electrons subject to random collisions with the crystal lattice (the direction where the electrons are scattered after a ...
16
votes
1answer
398 views

Why do quasicrystals have well-defined Fourier transforms?

I was recently reading about quasicrystals, and I was really surprised to learn that even though they do not have a periodic structure, and only have long range order in a very different sense to the ...
0
votes
0answers
135 views

A simple question on the projected wave function?

For example, consider a spin-1/2 AFM Heisenberg Hamiltonian $H=\sum_{<ij>}\mathbf{S}_i\cdot\mathbf{S}_j$, and we perform a ...
6
votes
2answers
879 views

A question on the existence of Dirac points in graphene?

As we know, there are two distinct Dirac points for the free electrons in graphene. Which means that the energy spectrum of the 2$\times$2 Hermitian matrix $H(k_x,k_y)$ has two degenerate points $K$ ...
5
votes
2answers
834 views

Basic Question - Green's Functions in Quantum Mechanics

I am trying to learn about Green's functions as part of my graduate studies and have a rather basic question about them: In my maths textbooks and a lot of places online, the basic Greens function G ...
7
votes
3answers
808 views

Mathematical rigorous introduction to solid state physics

I am looking for a good mathematical rigorous introduction to solid state physics. The style and level for this solid state physics book should be comparable to Abraham Marsdens Foundations of ...
6
votes
1answer
291 views

Thermodynamic limit “vs” the method of steepest descent

Let me use this lecture note as the reference. I would like to know how in the above the expression (14) was obtained from expression (12). In some sense it makes intuitive sense but I would ...
12
votes
2answers
463 views

Literature on fractal properties of quasicrystals

At the seminar where the talk was about quasicrystals, I mentioned that some results on their properties remind the fractals. The person who gave the talk was not too fluent in a rigor mathematics ...
2
votes
1answer
203 views

Fourier analysis in crystallography

What is the best reference for an introduction to the use of Fourier analysis in crystallography?
10
votes
2answers
310 views

What is known about some massive Gaussian models on a lattice?

Recently I started to play with some massive Gaussian models on a lattice. Motivation being that I work on massless models and want to understand the massive case because it seems easier to handle ...
16
votes
4answers
3k views

A pedestrian explanation of conformal blocks

I would be very happy if someone could take a stab at conveying what conformal blocks are and how they are used in conformal field theory (CFT). I'm finally getting the glimmerings of understanding ...