Numbers of the form $\{z= x+ i\,y:\;x,\, y\in\mathbb{R}\}$ where $i^2 = -1$. Useful especially as quantum mechanics, where system states take complex vector values.

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Could the phase factor $i$ be replaced by “matrix representation” totally in quantum mechanics? [duplicate]

It seems that $i$ plays an important role in quantum mechanics (Q.M.). On the other hand, linear algebra plays such an important role in Q.M. too. So would linear algebra, such as a matrix be able to ...
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1answer
43 views

What is the physical significane of Complex Time Evolution in EM Waves? [duplicate]

So, I have been having a hard time understanding why there is even a complex phase for EM waves: $$\phi=\exp[i\omega t]=\cos(\omega t)+i\sin(\omega t)$$ Don't understand why it is there? Any one ...
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1answer
113 views

Why do we use $\psi$ instead of a straightforward probability?

What is the advantage/purpose of using $\psi$ for wavefunctions and getting the probability with $|\psi|^2$ as opposed to just defining and using the probability function?
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5answers
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What are functions of a complex variable used for in physics?

Whenever someone asks "Why are complex numbers important?" the answer, at least in the context of physics, usually includes things like quantum mechanics, oscillators and AC circuits. This is all very ...
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1answer
167 views

Index of Refraction in Metal: Approximating Complex Perturbation

If you consider waves in a metal, you can write the index of refraction for the metal as, $$ n^2 = 1 - \frac{\omega_p^2}{\omega^2} $$ I am interested in what will happen if the index is perturbed by ...
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2answers
251 views

Dimensional aspects of the imaginary unit $i$ in physics [duplicate]

From a real world perspective each dimension in the 3-D Cartesian System can be represented by an axis that is perpendicular to 2 other axes. I read somewhere else that the effect of ${\sqrt {-1}}$ is ...
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1answer
54 views

Square of the momentum operator (issue with taking dot product of complex numbers)

So the momentum operator in coordinate space is: $$ \vec{p} = -i\hbar\vec{\nabla}$$ And the hamiltonian for a free particle is: $$ H = \frac{p^2}{2m}$$ All over the internet I see this written as: $$ ...
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1answer
164 views

Transmission + Reflection coefficients >1 For Potencial Barrier with Negative Complex Part Contradicts Paper

I am studying reflection and transmission coefficients for a barrier consisting of a a step potencial defined by: $$V(x):=\begin{cases}0&{\rm if}\,|x|>a/2 \\ V_0+iW_0 & {\rm ...
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1answer
517 views

Phasor form of Maxwell's Equations

I'm interested in the transformation from the standard Maxwell's equations to their phasor equivalents. From the literature, this means injecting: \begin{equation} E = Re(\boldsymbol{E}e^{j\omega ...
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4answers
433 views

Why complex functions for explaining wave particle duality?

I have this very bad habit of going to the scratch, discarding all the developments of a theory and worldly knowledge, and ask some fundamental (mostly stupid and naive, as some may say) questions as ...
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0answers
48 views

Complex Fourier Particular Solution [closed]

I have found the complex Fourier series for my desired force. I now need to find the steady-state forced vibration of my oscillator as a Fourier Series. (The particular solution to the inhomogeneous ...
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3answers
412 views

Applications of analytic continuation to physics

I posted this on math.SE, but didn't get much response. It might fit better on this site. Holomorphic functions have the property that they can be uniquely analytically continued to (almost) the ...
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2answers
875 views

Why treat complex scalar field and its complex conjugate as two different fields?

I am new to QFT, so I may have some of the terminology incorrect. Many QFT books provide an example of deriving equations of motion for various free theories. One example is for a complex scalar ...
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6answers
1k views

Why are Only Real Things Measurable?

Why can't we measure imaginary numbers? I mean, we can take the projection of a complex wave to be the "viewable" part, so why are imaginary numbers given this immeasurable descriptor? Namely with ...
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1answer
530 views

Why is the wave function complex? [duplicate]

Why should an equation (TDSE) in which first time derivative is related to second space derivative have a solution that contains $i$?The wave function is supposed to be complex, but I am unable to ...
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2answers
345 views

Real Part of the Wave Function

In Quantum Mechanics the square of the wave function is compared to a probability density. Is there no similar relation to waves in the sense that something meaningful can be ascribed to the real part ...
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2answers
2k views

What does the complex electric field show?

We have a complex electric field. Is there any definition for absolute and imaginary part of a complex electric field? What do they stand for?
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2answers
572 views

Global phase symmetry for complex scalar field theory

I have started to study QFT. And I have some difficulties in such classical situation. Suppose i want to calculate $\frac{\partial \mathcal{L}}{\partial (\partial_\mu \phi)}\phi$ for lagrangian ...
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2answers
164 views

“Complex Variables Method” in Diff. Eq. - Justification and physical meaning?

A common method of simplifying calculations that involve differential equations - particularly involving oscillation - is to replace $\cos(\theta)$ with $e^{i \omega t}$, evaluate, and then take the ...
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6answers
661 views

What is Quantization?

In classical mechanics you construct an action (involving a Lagrangian in arbitrary generalized coordinates, a Hamiltonian in canonical coordinates [to make your EOM more "convenient & ...
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6answers
1k views

What does imaginary number maps to physically?

I am taking undergraduate quantum mechanics currently, and the concept of an imaginary number had always troubled me. I always feel that complex numbers are more of a mathematical convenience, but ...
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2answers
577 views

Finding Stagnation Points from the complex potential

I am trying to find the stagnation point of a fluid flow from a complex potential. The complex potential is given by $$\Omega(z) = Uz + \cfrac{m}{2\pi}\ln z.$$ From this I found the streamfunction to ...
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1answer
230 views

Are electrodynamics problems in the complex plane relevant to real life?

This is a question I asked in Maths SE, and it was suggested I ask it here. This is a direct copy of that question. I have been reading Tristan Needham's excellent Visual Complex Analysis. The end of ...
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1answer
103 views

Some complex-number manipulation when calculating coefficients

I am going through Sakurai's quantum mechanics, and at one point the solution to a problem says: $(\sin(\beta)\cos(\alpha)-i\sin(\beta)\sin(\alpha))b+\cos(\beta)a=a$ ...
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1answer
71 views

Nonequilibrium themal QFT

Wick rotation to thermal of QFT in Minkowski space to thermal QFT, which is after this transformation analogue to statistical mechanics, does only describe equilibrium statistical mechanics. On page ...
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3answers
711 views

Born's Rule, What is the Reason?

As far as I've read online, there isn't a good explanation for the Born Rule. Is this the case? Why does taking the square of the wave function give you the Probability? Naturally it removes negatives ...
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3answers
263 views

States and observables in quantum mechanics

I'm beginning learn quantum mechanics. As I understand, state is a map $\phi$ from $L^2(\mathbb R)$ such that $|\phi|^2$ describes probability density of a particle's position. By integrating ...
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1answer
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Variational Derivation of Schrodinger Equation

In reading Weinstock's Calculus of Variations, on pages 261 - 262 he explains how Schrodinger apparently first derived the Schrodinger equation from variational principles. Unfortunately I don't ...
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80 views

Wick rotation and special relativity

CMIIW, but as I understand it, Wick rotation replaces the Minkowski basis (t,x,y,z) with the Euclidean basis (it,x,y,z). Suppose that $t_2=t_1 \cosh \beta+x_1 \sinh \beta$ and $x_2=t_1 \sinh \beta+x_1 ...
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1answer
109 views

Using angular momentum in complex coordinates

So given the angular momentum operator: $$L_{z} = - ih\biggl(x \frac{\mathrm{d}}{\mathrm{d}y} - y \frac{\mathrm{d}}{\mathrm{d}x}\biggr)$$ I know how to write these in terms of polar coordinates ...
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1answer
239 views

Imaginary masses

While watching this video, at around 5:00, the man mentions a certain type of particle having imaginary mass. He also says that these kind of particles can go faster then light. But how it is possible ...
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1answer
467 views

Formulas for kinetic energy

I was reading ABC of relativity from Bertrand Russell and some formulas about kinetic energy caused me some problems. Here is the extract : The kinetic energy is, in the usual form ...
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0answers
58 views

What is the relationship between complex time singularities and UV fixed points?

In this paper it is described how the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the flatness (a measure for intermittency) are governed by the position of the (dominant) singularities of the solutions of ...
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1answer
61 views

Phasor representation of voltage in frequency domain

In a text on application of electromagnetism in transmission line, there introduces a phasor for the voltage (in frequency domain) $$\tilde{V}(x) = V^+e^{-i\beta x} + V^-e^{i\beta x.}$$ Here $V^+$ ...
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2answers
597 views

What is a physical example of a Saddle-Node Bifurcation?

I am doing a presentation on bifurcations and would like physical examples to go along with each type of bifurcation but I am unable to find or think of any good example of a simple Saddle Node ...
0
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1answer
88 views

Work done by complex field on complex plane

A force field is given by $F = 3z+5$. Find the work done in moving an object in this force field along the parabola $z = t^2 + it$ from $z = 0$ to $z = 4+2i$. I don't understand why conjugate ...
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2answers
241 views

Is there a physical motivation to study finite fields?

Clearly finite groups are of immense value in physics and these are also substructures of fields. However I never came across any computations involving finite fields at university and so I never ...
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1answer
289 views

Usage of Schrödinger equation vs Madelung equations

It is well known that Madelung formulation is alternative to the Schrödinger Formulation, cf. this previous Madelung transformation Phys.SE post. I wanted to know what makes Schrödinger's formulation ...
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1answer
1k views

Deriving the Sommerfeld expansion by contour integration (Le Bellac p. 277)

In Le Bellac's statistical physics book he derives the Sommerfeld expansion by a contour integral. The idea is to expand integrals of the type $I(\beta)\equiv \int_{0}^{\infty}d\epsilon\, ...
4
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4answers
3k views

Confused over complex representation of the wave

My quantum mechanics textbook says that the following is a representation of a wave traveling in the +$x$ direction:$$\Psi(x,t)=Ae^{i\left(kx-\omega t\right)}\tag1$$ I'm having trouble visualizing ...
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2answers
861 views

Amplitude of Probability amplitude. Which one is it?

QM begins with a Born's rule which states that probability $P$ is equal to a modulus square of probability amplitude $\psi$: $$P = \left|\psi\right|^2.$$ If I write down a wave function like this ...
2
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0answers
275 views

Probability and probability amplitude [duplicate]

What made scientists believe that we should calculate probability $P$ as the $P = \left|\psi\right|^2$ in quantum mechanics? Was it the double slit experiment? How? Is there anywhere in the ...
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1answer
2k views

Solving the time independent Schrodinger equation: Does a complex solution make sense?

In my notes, I have the Time Independent Schrodinger equation for a free particle $$\frac{\partial^2 \psi}{\partial x^2}+\frac{p^2}{\hbar^2}\psi=0\tag1$$ The solution to this is given, in my notes, ...
6
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2answers
323 views

Complex coordinates in CFT

The Setup: Let's say we want to study a Euclidean $\mathrm{CFT}_2$ on $\mathbb R^2$ with coordinates $\sigma^1$ and $\sigma^2$ and metric $ds^2 = (d\sigma^1)^2+(d\sigma^2)^2$. It seems to me that ...
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1answer
215 views

Two similar questions related to analytic continuation of a complex variable and its conjugate

See the scan attached below. Brown, in his QFT book, argues a certain way to do an integral. I understand that 1.8.13 or equivalently 1.8.14 can be performed once analytic continuation is done. I ...
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2answers
413 views

Is the step of analytic continuation unavoidable or can you model around it?

One sometimes considers the analytic continuation of certain quantities in physics and take them seriously. More so than the direct or actual values, actually. For example if you use the procedure ...
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2answers
349 views

In classical mechanics, are complex numbers unphysical? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Physics math without $\sqrt{-1}$ When I produce a complex final solution to a problem that began without complex coefficients at all, I have so far (with my limited ...
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1answer
208 views

Why can you re-write the functional measure of a real-valued field $\phi(x)$ as $\mathcal{D}\phi=\prod_{k_n^0>0}dRe \phi(k_n) d Im \phi(k_n)$?

This happens in Peskin and Schroeder, An Introduction to QFT, on page 285. They set out to calculate correlation functions for the free real-valued Klein-Gordon field $\phi(x)\in \mathbb{R}$. They ...
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10answers
4k views

QM without complex numbers

I am trying to understand how complex numbers made their way into QM. Can we have a theory of the same physics without complex numbers? If so, is the theory using complex numbers easier?
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3answers
2k views

Absolute value sign when normalizing a wave function

I have solved the following problem from Griffiths "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics". Consider the wavefunction: $\Psi (x,t) = A e^{-\lambda |x|} e^{-i\omega t} $ Normalize $\Psi$. Now, we ...