Interaction between two or more bodies that results in physical contact and an exchange of momentum between the bodies involved.

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The Time That 2 Masses Will Collide Due To Newtonian Gravity

My friend and I have been wracking our heads with this one for the past 3 hours... We have 2 point masses, $m$ and $M$ in a perfect world separated by radius r. Starting from rest, they both begin to ...
7
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2answers
1k views

Physics of simple collisions

I'm building a physics simulator for a graphics course, and so far I have it implementing gravitational and Coulomb forces. I want to add collisions next, but I'm not exactly sure how to go about ...
15
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6answers
12k views

Is two cars colliding at 50mph the same as one car colliding into a wall at 100 mph?

I was watching a youtube video the other day where an economist said that he challenged his physics professor on this question back when he was in school. His professor said each scenario is the same, ...
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2answers
416 views

Two balls falling one above the other [closed]

Two balls, first with the mass $m_1$ and the second with the mass $m_2$ are falling from the heigh $h$. Suppose all the collisions are perfectly elastic and do not consider the size of the balls. $m_1 ...
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1answer
110 views

Where can I find the equations for “quasi” elastic collisions?

Yes, you all talk about neutrinos and spins, but I came out with this basic s**t :D All of us learnt the basic equations of collisions, elastic (everything bounces and energy remains the same), or ...
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6answers
8k views

Newton's cradle

Why, when one releases 2 balls in Newton's cradle, two balls on the opposite side bounce out at approximately the same speed as the 1st pair, rather than one ball at higher speed, or 3 balls at lower ...
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7answers
4k views

Would it help if you jump inside a free falling elevator?

Imagine you're trapped inside a free falling elevator. Would you decrease your impact impulse by jumping during the fall? When?
9
votes
4answers
741 views

Collision of Phobos

Mars has two moons: Phobos and Deimos. Both are irregular and are believed to have been captured from the nearby asteroid belt. Phobos always shows the same face to Mars because of tidal forces ...
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7answers
1k views

How can momentum but not energy be conserved in an inelastic collision?

In inelastic collisions, kinetic energy changes, so the velocities of the objects also change. So how is momentum conserved in inelastic collisions?
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3answers
380 views

Train crash: are these situations alike? [duplicate]

I was just wondering... I believe that if a car travelling 50 miles per hour crashes into a wall, the result should be the same as crashing to another car also travelling 50 miles per hour (but in the ...
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1answer
221 views

How to get the new direction of 2 disks colliding?

I'm developing a 2D game including collisions between many disks. I would like to know how I can get the angle corresponding to the new direction of each disk. For every disk I have this information ...
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2answers
246 views

Why can't collisions be elastic?

I understand that in inelastic collisions thermal energy is given out, but why does that happen? Why can't they simply rebound without giving off energy? Also, why in some collisions more heat is ...
0
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1answer
640 views

Elastic Collision And Momentum

The question I am working on is, "Two blocks are free to slide along the friction-less wooden track shown below. The block of mass $m_1 = 4.98~kg$ is released from the position shown, at height $h = ...
0
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1answer
479 views

How are these balls reflected after they hit each other? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Physics of simple collisions I have 2 photos of the balls, one before the collision and one after the collision. They do a elastic collision. I want to know how is the ...
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votes
1answer
71 views

Ascertain the height an object has fallen from given force exerted and mass [closed]

An object of a given mass falls from an unknown height. If the force exerted by the object on contact with the ground is known, how would you ascertain the height from which the object fell?
5
votes
2answers
200 views

Formalism to deal with discontinuous potentials in classical mechanics (hard wall, hard spheres)

It seems to me that Hamiltonian formalism does not suit well for problems involving instantaneous change of momentum, like particle collisions with hard wall or hard sphere gas model. At least I could ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Is there a 2D generalization of the coefficient of restitution?

The coefficient of restitution characterizes a collision in one dimension by relating the initial and final speeds of the particles involved, $$C_R = -\frac{v_{2f} - v_{1f}}{v_{2i} - v_{1i}}$$ In a ...
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1answer
85 views

Is the center of mass in general relativity equal to the center of mass in newtonian gravity?

Consider 2 point masses $A,B$ a distance $d$ away from eachother without velocity or rotation spin. Is the center of mass in general relativity equal to the center of mass in newtonian gravity ? In ...
10
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1answer
381 views

Mars just collided with Earth! A question of eccentricity

One of the standard theories behind the formation of our Moon is the giant impact hypothesis, according to which Earth was struck by a Mars-sized body (about $10\%$ the mass of Earth) early in its ...
5
votes
1answer
426 views

What's worse, a full frontal impact or an impact at an offset?

Modern car designs have a crumple zone that absorbs most of the impact in a collision, and a strong "safety cell" in the passenger compartment that protects the passengers. These designs are put to ...
4
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0answers
147 views

Hamiltonian function for classical hard-sphere elastic collision

I'm trying to find the Hamiltonian function for a system consisting of a single particle in one dimension colliding elastically with a wall at x = 0. Everything I've read on the topic (e.g. this ...
4
votes
1answer
275 views

How and why will the Milky way collide with the Andromeda?

Hubble's law says that the universe is expanding.How come the milky way and the andromeda are on a collision course?How will they end up colliding with each other?
3
votes
3answers
776 views

Newton's 3rd Law: How can I break things?

If I punch a wooden board hard enough and it breaks in two, has the board still exerted a force of equal magnitude on my fist? When the board breaks in two due to my force, the halves have a ...
3
votes
1answer
284 views

What is the function of the top point of a bouncing ball?

A ball is thrown away as parallel to x axis from M(0,h) point with speed V . After each jumping on x axis , it can reach half of previous height as shown in the figure.(Assume that no any air ...
2
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3answers
342 views

The theory of moon creation when a Mars size planet hit Earth

As we know the predominant theory where does the moon come from is that a Mars size planet hit the earth and took a chunk out of it which eventually materialized into moon. My question is that if a ...
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3answers
232 views

Force when acceleration is zero

i tried to find it in books but i was unable to do so and i am not able to understand this and I couldn't think of a better example. i repeat. its just an example. if i punch someone's face with my ...
0
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1answer
53 views

How does this formula for calculating the “mass sum” in a collision translate to 3D?

According this tutorial, formula number 5: $$j = \frac{-(1 + e)((V^{A} - V^{B}) * t)}{\frac{1}{mass^{A}} + \frac{1}{mass^{B}}}$$ translates into formula number 6: $$j = \frac{-(1 + e)((V^{A} - ...
0
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1answer
349 views

Can a photon survive a collision? If so, is it at rest during the process?

Background Irving Kaplan, in Article 6.7: The Compton Effect of Nuclear Physics (2nd Ed.) explains the Compton effect as follows: Compton (1923) was able to show that when a beam of ...
0
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2answers
1k views

Two objects exert forces on each other, will the reactions affect them?

Two objects go in against each other, and then they collide, will object 1, exerting force 1, necessarily get on it a reaction equal in magnitude and opposite in direction? EDIT:- In my book it only ...