1
vote
1answer
90 views

Case of the mysterious bullets (taken from Mad About Physics)

"Two ideal bullets, identical in shape, size and mass, strike the same target with the same speed just before the collision. Force meters at the target register two times the force value for bullet A ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

In a CMCS 2-body system, why does the speed of the particles after collision stay the same?

A particle $m_1$ is traveling with velocity $v$ toward a stationary particle $m_2$. The velocity of the center of mass is given as $v_c=\frac{m_1}{m_1+m_2}v$. Changing to a moving coordinate system, ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Change of kinetic energy in a two particle collision

A problem I am working on proceeds as follows: A billiard ball of mass $M$ is initially at rest on a horizontal frictionless table. Another ball of mass $m < M$ and velocity $\mathbf{v}$ in ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Question on the negativity of the coefficient of restitution

I was trying to solve a Mechanics question on Momentum. Here is the question : Two small smooth spheres A and B have equal radii and have masses m and km respectively. They are moving in a ...
3
votes
2answers
32 views

Elastic collisions and conservation of momentum

If you have an elastic collision between objects 1 and 2 and where 'kinetic energy is conserved', does this mean object 1 will always have the same velocity it had before the collision? Or will ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

The relation between angle of impact and scattering angle. The general formula [closed]

When two balls A and B collide (elastically) in 2-D and B is at rest, if their masses are equal ($m_a = m_b$), knowing the angle of impact $\gamma$ (for example 60°), we know that the scattering angle ...
2
votes
3answers
405 views

Conservation of momentum but not kinetic energy in inelastic collisions

In inelastic collisions, the kinetic energy of the system is not conserved but the momentum is. Kinetic energy is: $0.5 \times \text{mass} \times \text{velocity}^2$. Momentum is: ...
4
votes
3answers
81 views

Why is momentum conserved in an inelastic collision and kinetic energy is not conserved?

We know that in an inelastic collision that total momentum of the system before collision equals the total momentum after collision. But total kinetic energy before collision is not equal to total ...
2
votes
4answers
197 views

What do you exactly mean when you say that momentum is conserved? In other words: Which momentum is conserved?

I am taking for granted that when we say that something is conserved it is understood 'in its full integrity'. Energy is represented by a number (of J, or other) and is usually conserved. But ...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

Why do safety helmets have a softer inner layer nearer the head?

I know that when an object collides onto the helmet, it causes an inelastic collision so that energy is absorbed by the structure of the helmet, so what exactly does the softer inner layer do? Does it ...
2
votes
4answers
169 views

How to calculate a collision which is partly elastic and partly inelastic?

(For the purpose of this question, "calculating a collision" means: given the velocities and masses of two objects in a collision, figuring out the new velocities of both objects after the collision). ...
1
vote
2answers
83 views

Why is scattering vector $\vec{q}$ called vector of 'momentum transfer'?

In the world of scattering the angle at which you detect the scattered radiation is known as $q$, where $$ \vec{q} = \frac{4\pi\eta}{\lambda}\sin(\theta/2) $$ I read in a lot of books that this is ...
1
vote
3answers
184 views

Conservation of 4-momentum in special relativity

I understand that the inner product of two 4-vectors is conserved under the Lorentz transformations, so that the absolute value of the four momentum is the same in any reference frame. This is what I ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Swinging onto a Hill

I was just watching the movie "Frozen" (not the Disney one), and they were trapped in a ski lift 50 feet off the ground. They had to jump. My question is, when they jump, should they swing on the ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

What factors indicates inelastic collision?

I am watching this example from Wikipedia: I am wondering what factors would indicate that the collision of 2 objects will be inelastic (I know macroscopic scale impacts are never perfectly ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Velocity change of objects

Is it possible for small object (small mass, let's say bullet) to hit large object (big mass, let's say rock) and still move forward (or stop) instead of being reflected (let's say objects don't crush ...
0
votes
2answers
86 views

Calculating velocity change after impact?

Let's say there is no gravity here and objects won't crush. We have 2 rocks with $m=10\text{ kg}$. First rock has velocity $v_1=0\text{ m/s}$ and second $v_2=10\text{ m/s}$ (flying in leftward ...
5
votes
4answers
444 views

How to tell if the collision is elastic or inelastic?

I'm a programmer and a game developer, not a mathematician or a physicist. So please go easy on the math :) I know two things: How to find the new velocities of two objects after an elastic ...
0
votes
2answers
91 views

Ballistic Pendulum Demo Problem

I have a question about the following problem: I got the solution $v=\frac{M+m}{m} \sqrt{2gh}$. But my real question is in the following picture: In the above slide, how can you derive ...
3
votes
3answers
138 views

Elastic collision of point particle and rod

A 1 meter long rod on the ice with mass $m_2=1$ kg is perpendicularly hit on one end by a point particle with mass $m_1=0.1$ kg. The collision is elastic and the point particle is bounced back in ...
1
vote
1answer
229 views

What are the general solutions to a hard sphere collision?

Surely someone has found the solutions to the hard sphere collisions (in $n$ dimensions) of two bodies of mass $m_1$ and $m_2$, respectively--that is the resultant velocities (or momenta) of the two ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

Relative Velocities and Conservation of Kinetic Energy

An object of mass m moves with velocity $v$ towards a stationary object of same mass. Impact is an elastic collision. $v_1$ is the velocity after impact of the mass originally moving $v_2$ is the ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Is there such a thing as instantly stopping?

I'm sorry if this is a stupid question, but I've never taken a physics class and I was curious about something. But anyway, my question is, is there such a thing as instantly stopping? For example, if ...
1
vote
3answers
913 views

When is energy conserved in a collision and not momentum?

Consider the following example: A bullet of mass 45g is fired at a speed of 220 m/s into a 5.0 kg sandbag hanging from a string from the ceiling. The sandbag absorbs the bullet and begins to ...
4
votes
8answers
6k views

How can momentum but not energy be conserved in an inelastic collision?

In inelastic collisions, kinetic energy changes, so the velocities of the objects also change. So how is momentum conserved in inelastic collisions?
2
votes
2answers
232 views

How to calculate velocities after collision?

I'm currently writing a program for a particle simulator. One of the requirements is that the particles collide in a realistic way. However, I don't know how to calculate the final velocities. For ...
1
vote
1answer
121 views

Confused about elasticity and collisions

I was solving the following problem and the explanation to it confused me. There are two objects with mass $m$ and $M$, respectively. The object with mass $m$ has a velocity of $\sqrt{2gl}$ and ...
3
votes
1answer
782 views

Can the velocity of the center of mass of two spheres change after a collision?

I'm curious as to whether or not the velocity of the center of mass of a system comprised of two spheres can change after the two spheres collide. Looking at the equation for the velocity of the ...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

Perfect elastic collision and velocity transfer

So my teacher told me that when you have two identical balls in a perfectly elastic collision, the first ball A will collide with B and afterwards A will stop and B continue. Why is this? Doesn't ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Trouble evaluating an integral arising from particle collision

Assume we have two charged particles colliding. He have particle 1 with mass $m_1$, charge $Z_1 \cdot e$ which travels in $x$-Direction passing by a STATIONARY particle 2 (mass $m_2$, charge $Z_2 ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Heavy vs Light Particle Ideal Gases

Assume there are two ideal gases. The first is made of a light particle, and the second is made of a heavy particle. The two are of the same amount, in the same volume container, and at the same ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

Storing kinetic energy in bonds

Let's assume a setup with a static linear molecule with three identical atoms connected by bonds and a single atom, identical to the other three, being shot at the molecule. Let's also assume that ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Question about Cars: Momentum

Car B rests at the bottom of a frictionless inclined plane. In order to travel a height of 0.6m and maintain a speed of 2 m/s at the end of the track it needs to start with 4 m/s. a) If ...
0
votes
3answers
295 views

Which parameter determines how much the 'recoil' or force applied by an object hurts?

Another question from my textbook, directly following after this question: 2 identical bullets are fired, on from a lighter rifle and one from a heavier one, with the same amount of force. Which ...
0
votes
1answer
193 views

Calculate force of impact on running dog

I'm going to hold a dog protection tournament. I'd like to give the audience information about the force of the impact of the running dog when it hit(attacks) the decoy on a huge screen. I'm a ...
2
votes
2answers
137 views

How is the Principle of Conservation of Momentum proven using the Momentum-Impulse Principle?

Consider two particles moving in the same direction on the same line, $A$ and $B$, with mass $m_A$ and $m_B$, respectively. They also have velocies $u_A$ and $u_B$. They collide. After the collision A ...
1
vote
3answers
273 views

Two dimensional elastic collisions with varying angle of incident

If in an elastic collision I know all initial values and that mass for each object remains constant throughout the collision (but different from one another) how can I determine their final velocity ...
8
votes
2answers
225 views

How multiple objects in contact are resolved in an inelastic collision, when edge normals don't “line up”

In a case I understand, let's say I have an object A moving at velocity V toward 3 objects in contact B, C, and D: The momentum of A is the mass of A times its velocity. To figure out how the ...
0
votes
2answers
499 views

Simple conservation of momentum and frame of reference problem

I'm making a very simple physics engine based on momentum, and I'm solving what response to use for a collision from each involved object's frame of reference. However, something about how I'm ...
4
votes
1answer
262 views

Firing machine question

Suppose we have a firing machine on a frictionless surface at point $x=0$. It fires a bullet of mass $m$ every $T$ seconds. Each bullet has the same constant velocity $v_0$. There's a body of mass ...
0
votes
1answer
161 views

Newton's second law?

$F=ma$. A car strikes a wall at 60 mph. Its acceleration is zero at the time. The force of the car against the wall or vice versa is? To look at the car the force is not zero. Please explain.
0
votes
2answers
84 views

Minimum $E$ of $p\bar{p}$-collision for $q\bar{q}$ pair with mass $m_q$

I am currently working out the energy required to create a particle anti-particle pair from a collision of a proton travelling along the x-direction with an anti-proton which is at rest. The particle ...
0
votes
2answers
9k views

Calculating force of impact

Since $\text{force = mass}\times\text{acceleration}$, is it right to say that an object traveling at a high constant velocity (zero acceleration), exerts zero force upon impact with a stationary ...
0
votes
1answer
926 views

Calculating a 2D collision between two perfectly circular disks [duplicate]

Assume I have two disks, $p_1$ and $p_2$, of radius $r$, with their own velocities (preferably in $(x,y)$ form, but $(m, \theta)$ works too) and masses (unit-less, but same unit) collide in two ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Mean value of the force in a collision problem

I have the following problem: A point with mass $m$ and speed $v$ collides with a fixed obstacle and penetrates it, stopping in a space $\Delta x$. Calculate $\Delta t $. I understand the way my ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Small car colliding with large truck

A small car collides with a large truck. Why do both vehicles experience the same magnitude of force? Wouldn't the large vehicle experience less force than the small one?
2
votes
1answer
283 views

How to get the new direction of 2 disks colliding?

I'm developing a 2D game including collisions between many disks. I would like to know how I can get the angle corresponding to the new direction of each disk. For every disk I have this information ...
5
votes
1answer
375 views

What is the result of a classical collision between THREE point particles at the same precise instant?

Classical Mechanics is said to be deterministic, a statement that nearly always is followed by that quote from Laplace, something like If at one time, one knew the positions and velocities of all ...
2
votes
3answers
689 views

Simple elastic collision

If a particle with mass $m$ collides with a wall at right angles, and the collision is perfectly elastic. The particle hits the wall at $v\ ms^{-1}$. There is no friction or gravity. So the particle ...
-1
votes
4answers
588 views

Classical mechanics and the speed of a train-mosquito collision, when perfectly rigid bodies

This is all under the assumption that they are perfectly rigid bodies: A train is moving at 300m/s. A mosquito is moving directly towards it, head-on, at 4m/s. When the mosquito and the train ...