The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is the electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band which can be observed throughout the whole universe, not connected to any astronomical object. Its spectrum follows a very precise black-body radiation with a temperature of about 2.7 K.

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calculation of mean energy value of CMB photons for recombination

I am interested in the calculation of the mean energy value of CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background) photons from which the recombination is performed. The subject on French Wikipedia says : ...
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What is the relationship between the E mode polarisation of the CMB and the velocity of the primordial plasma precisely?

I understand that the CMB is polarised into E and B modes due to Thompson scattering in the primordial plasma of the early universe. Also, I understand that this polarisation is directly related to ...
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The CMB and the Hubble comoving radius

I have been thinking on this for a while and i don't get it. My point is, the comoving Hubble radius $(aH)^{-1}$ is the distance at wich the universe expansion begins to be superluminical. In an ...
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Is there a direct/indirect detection for the homogeneity of the Universe?

I know that for mathematical simplicity the Universe is assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous (the cosmological principle). The isotropy of the universe, and correct me if I'm wrong, is confirmed ...
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Could I see the cosmic microwave background if it were Doppler shifted enough?

If I traveled fast enough, my current understanding is that visible light would be blueshifted to the blue/UV range, but also that microwaves and longer wavelength waves would be blueshifted into the ...
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Has the cosmic alignment of Earth and the Solar System been explained (CMB anisotropy)

The Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy is currently aligning Earth and the Solar System with the largest and earliest structure of the universe. Has this been explained yet? Or are the theories ...
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Scanning the universe - edit: expanding or shrinking

I know that this may sound as a very basic question, but how come that we can detect CMB radiation, light or gravitational waves from the big-bang era? Shouldn't this radiation has overtaken us a ...
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92 views

How is this conflict about age of the universe resolved?

In a previous Phys.SE question, Does a spaceship travelling at near lightspeed see the universe aging slow or fast?, the answer (which was followed by a proof involving co-moving reference frames) was ...
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Radiative equilibrium in orbit of a black hole

According to Life under a black sun, Miller's planet from Interstellar, with a time dilation factor of 60,000, should be heated to around 890C by blue-shifted cosmic background radiation. How they ...
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What determines the size of features on the CMB?

I have been learning about baryon acoustic oscillations. I am however confused about the size of the features as seen on the CMB. It is claimed that the largest structures have a size given by the ...
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Baryonic acoustic oscillations: Why are there standing waves in the CMB?

On page three of the following http://www.quantumfieldtheory.info/CMB.pdf, Klauber talks about the formation of standing waves from acoustic vibrations in the early universe. He claims that they form ...
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Scales In Inflationary Cosmology

In inflationary cosmology terminologies, what do the scale, scale invariance and scale dependence really mean? This is an excerpt from http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0702170v3.pdf "In presenting ...
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Would the presence of B-modes in the CMB provide evidence for quantum gravity?

Finding B-modes in the CMB (which aren't due to foreground contamination) would be evidence for gravitational waves, because they cannot be produced by density perturbations (to first order, is my ...
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CMB curly B-modes and dark matter

I raised a question a while ago regarding weak gravitational lensing of galaxies and the CMB. With all the fuzz with the BICEP2 data, I think it is time to raise even more questions about this amazing ...
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208 views

BICEP2 experiments

How was the polarization experimentally measured in the BICEP2 experiments and why did they look specifically at B-modes? Why is it implying the existence of gravitational waves and the need to ...
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893 views

What do the line segments on the BICEP2 B-mode polarization map mean?

The first image of BICEP2 visuals shows the "BICEP2 B-mode Signal", described as follows: Gravitational waves from inflation generate a faint but distinctive twisting pattern in the ...
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543 views

Inflation Scale via CMB Polarization

COBE, WMAP, and now PLANCK, have or are in the process of measuring anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. WMAP has dectected E-mode polarization from electron Thomson scattering, but not ...
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Problem with denoising BICEP2 data?

This question pertains to this article which talks about why the BICEP2 measurements of B-mode polarization in Cosmic microwave background radiation turned out to be noise from galactic stardust. They ...
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Could there have been two “Big Bangs”?

A couple of years ago, I remember seeing a documentary on the big bang theory. The theory presented was that to explain the cosmic microwave background radiation, there needed to have been two big ...
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Where does CMB come/emit from?

Where exactly does CMB come from. I've seen it in documentaries as a huge sphere with Earth in the middle. But if all this radiation was ejected from the start of the universe some time after the big ...
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437 views

Will the CMB eventually recede outside our observable universe?

As I understand it, some billions of years ago, the universe used to be opaque (edge of the sun - orange colored). Due to the expansion of the universe, photons emitted billions of years ago from ...
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23 views

Will CMB images change as technology progresses?

Will cosmic background radiation images change as technology progresses? Will they become more precise, so to speak? I am asking because the images gotten by Planck and WAMP differ greatly. Will the ...
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705 views

How can we detect cosmic background radiation?

From what I understand, CMB is the left over radiation from the Big Bang. As all matter, including the Earth, was made during the Big Bang and then as the universe expanded that matter/energy got ...
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Inflation and scalar spectral index

I've been reading that the results from the Planck satellite constrain a number called the "scalar spectral index" to be 0.96 rather than 1 at the 5-sigma level. This is supposed to be big news, but ...
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What do the $T, E, B$ in polarization spectra mean?

I was reading about CMB Polarization here. I know that $E$ and $B$ stand for E-mode and B-mode, but what does the $T$ mean? The author states that there are 3 observables: $T, E, B$ and six spectra: ...
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What would we observe as background on the sky if the big bang had never occurred?

The data we've received so far from satellites such as WMAP paints a near uniform distribution in intensity of the background radiation that we take as evidence that our universe had an origin, and ...
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Where is radiation density in the Planck 2013 results?

I've been looking at the Planck 2013 cosmological parameters paper, trying to update my toy cosmology simulator with the most recent data. Most of the interesting values such as $H_0$, $\Omega_m$, ...
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I need Resources on CMB Neutrinos

I am doing a research paper for upper level undergrad class on CMB neutrinos (C$\nu$B). I need papers that explain CMB Neutrinos from the ground up like the main theory behind the CMB Neutrinos and ...
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327 views

Temperature in space

Temperature is a measure of kinetic energy transferred to particles, henceforth, space being vacuum, temperature cannot be measured. But then, there is cosmic background radiation. It is the leftover ...
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605 views

CMB parameter, what's the meaning of the matter power spectrum normalization $\sigma_8$?

Most CMB experiments like WMAP and Planck include a certain cosmological parameter called $\sigma_8$. My understanding is that normalization of the matter power spectrum is not a theoretical ...
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How do we know that the cosmic background radiation comes from the early universe?

How do we know that the source of the CMB comes from the early universe, and we don't simply observe the rare interstellar or intergalactic dust of 3K temperature?
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Number density of CMB photons?

When we talk about the present-day number density of photons ($n_\gamma\approx 10^8 $ $m^{-3}$) in the universe do we mean the number density of CMB photons? I mean there are other sources of ...
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61 views

Size of the universe from CMB?

The CMB is almost 13.8 billion light years away in every direction so the diameter of the visible universe as we actually observe it is 27.6 billion light years, twice the distance light traveled over ...
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How is the first acoustic peak calculated in CMB?

I'm trying to work out the rudiments of the CMB power curve. Looking at the Plank results, we're given the sound horizon at recombination as $\theta = 1.04147\times 10^{-2}$ (radians). So the first ...
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Is the CMB Cold spot growing or shrinking?

What do we know about the nature of this region of the sky? is that region entirely devoid of galaxies? Could it be a bubble void, and we are simply unable to see the galaxies that are on the ...
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How will TV Noise look like If we remove the Cosmic Microwave Background?

People have been saying that a small amount of noises you see in the Analog TV is from the CMB and other devices. What if the CMB never existed and the TV never got affected by devices? (Maybe in ...
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Why doesn't the Cosmic Microwave Background heat my food like a Microwave?

I know the reason we have a CMB is because the photons don't react with any of the matter in the universe, or the mean distance between interactions for photons generated since decoupling is now the ...
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Is the fluctuation pattern of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) identical in every location of the universe?

I know that the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is the leftover radiation from the "surface of last scattering". Let's say an alien civilisation lives on andromeda or further away. Would they see ...
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What did Nobel laureate Smoot mean by “Modern Efforts to Find Violations of Special Relativity”?

In George Smoot's 2006 Nobel Lecture, having won the Nobel prize for his research on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), he refers to the possibility of the CMB being a special frame stating ...
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155 views

How do quantum fluctuations lead to overdense regions in the CMB?

I've read a lot of work about Inflation but yet to find a cogent description where someone explains exactly what 'quantum fluctuations' are and how they led to overdense regions in the CMB. I get the ...
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The steady state theory, can it now be falsified on particle physics grounds, in addition to CMB data?

The steady state theory is no longer taken seriously by most physicists and the Big Bang theory is supported by an enormous amount of evidence, especially the CMB data. But from a quick scan through ...
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The temperature in space is about 3K, however there are almost no atoms in space. How can there be residual heat?

My understanding is that heat is essentially atomic vibrations. If there are almost no atoms, how can there be residual heat? Also, as I understand in space there is no heat transfer via convection ...
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Velocity of Solar System relative to CMB

In the book 'An introduction to science of cosmology' by Raine and Thomas, they have two equations $$ \frac{\Delta T}{T} = \frac{v}{c}\cos\theta'\qquad (4.14) $$ $$ T = ...
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698 views

What trajectory has the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation taken to get to earth?

I have a few related questions: Where is the CMB coming (emitted/reflected/remitted) from? When CMB hits the earth, is that the first thing those photons hit since they were emitted 400 thousand ...
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Is the cosmic microwave background radiation red shifted?

My question is. If the cosmic background radiation is red shifted how would you calculate the wavelength at the time it was emitted ?
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Correlation between large-scale galaxy structure and CMB fluctuations?

During a relatively non-technical astronomy seminar the other day, the speaker displayed the famous WMAP full-sky image as an aid to describing what the CMB is, the scale of its fluctuations, etc. ...
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Why is absolute zero considered to be asymptotical? Wouldn't regions such as massive gaps between galaxy clusters have temperatures of absolute zero?

Why is absolute zero considered to be asymptotical? Wouldn't regions such as massive gaps between galaxy clusters have temperatures of absolute zero? I just do not see why our model must work the way ...
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Units of angular power spectrum

I am not sure whether this question might be better suited for crossvalidated or stackoverflow, but I will give it a try here: I have a map of the full sky in in the healpix format, units are $\rm ...
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Is there a standard of rest in the universe? [duplicate]

If you measure the cosmic background radiation you will find that in any direction it is roughly the same. However, if you were to travel near the speed of light relative to the Earth in a particular ...
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How do we know that the CMBR is the oldest light?

How do we know that the CMBR is the oldest light which we can see? Is it based just on the facts 1.that waves redshift with expanding space, and 2.predictions of the big bang theory; Or is there a way ...