Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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7answers
551 views

Physics of how the cochlea isolates frequencies along its length?

Can anyone explain the separation of frequencies along the basilar membrane of the cochlea please? (equations would be nice) I understand it being related to the resistance caused by fluid in the ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Is it possible to eliminate Van der Waals interactions?

I came to know that the friction force actually depends on the surface contact area due to weak interactions (adhesion due to Van der Waals forces) between the atoms of both materials increasing in ...
0
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1answer
14 views

Motion in oscillating field: expanding in powers of $\xi$

I'm reading an excerpt from Landau/Lifschitz's Mechanics book about motion in oscillating fields. Two equations for the motion of a particle with mass $m$ are set out: \begin{equation} m\ddot{x} = ...
5
votes
3answers
61 views

Why is a beam reach the fastest point of sail on modern sailboats?

I've heard that a beam reach (perpendicular to the wind) is the fastest point of sail on modern sailboats, but I haven't heard a satisfying explanation of the physics behind the claim. Triangular ...
0
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2answers
37 views

How 'rare' is no-slipping?

I have come across a lot of questions that say something like: A ball rolls down a hill without slipping... But I have done the maths and found that a ball would only 'not slip' if the friction ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Angular momentum and the Units

I'm just curious about why many physical identities build relationship with the same units as angular momentum like the action, Lagrangian$\cdot$time, Hamiltonian$\cdot$time, phase space area etc?
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0answers
9 views

simple question on torques on an ellipsoid

I have an ellipsoid, and in the reference frame where the x-, y- and z-axis are aligned with its eigenvectors I compute the torque $\vec\tau$ acting on it. And I'm asking myself how can I quantify ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Work and chemical energy “paradox”

This is a mistake I've seen many people make, a few physicists included, but I haven't ever seen a satisfactory explanation for what's going on. Apologies for the lengthy setup. Setup Suppose I ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

What does a scale accelerating on an incline read?

I was watching an online video lecture about dynamics, and then I came across this brain teaser, and I've been thinking it over for a couple of hours but can't seem to find the solution. I hope ...
-1
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1answer
23 views

Central Force - Trajectory [on hold]

There is a central force $\vec{F}(\vec{r})=f(r)\vec{e_r}$. 1.1.: The trajectory/flight path is defined by $r=r(\phi)$, compute $f(r)$. 1.2.: The path is defined by $u=u(\phi)$ with ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

How to prove that any rotation can be represented by 3 Euler angles

How can one prove that any rotation of a rigid object in 3-dimensional (3D) space can be represented by a sequence of three rotations around pre-fixed axes by 3 Euler angles? I see this statement in ...
0
votes
2answers
82 views

What is the difference between configuration space and phase space?

What is the difference between configuration space and phase space? In particular, I notices that Lagrangians are defined over configuration space and Hamiltonians over phase space. Liouville's ...
10
votes
2answers
190 views

Are there other less famous yet accepted formalisms of Classical Mechanics?

I was lately studying about the Lagrange and Hamiltonian Mechanics. This gave me a perspective of looking at classical mechanics different from that of Newton's. I would like to know if there are ...
-1
votes
0answers
28 views

Central Force - Trajectory [duplicate]

There is a central force $\vec{F}(\vec{r})=f(r)\vec{e_r}$. 1.1.: The trajectory/flight path is defined by $r=r(\phi)$, compute $f(r)$. 1.2.: The path is defined by $u=u(\phi)$ with ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Force acting on a wheel of a two-wheeled self balancing bot

Proceeding further with my work on a self-balancing bot as posted here: http://bit.ly/1FfI6LK I've gotten stuck at the following equation: n = Gear ratio $K_t$ = DC motor torque constant $i_l$ = DC ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Angular acceleration as a function of torque

I know that the angular momentum $\mathbf{L}_{cm}$ with respect to the centre of mass of a rigid body can be expressed as $I\boldsymbol{\omega}$ where $I$ is the inertia matrix and ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Can someone explain what's the difference between all these terms in “Simple Words” with their “applications”? [on hold]

I'm very confused between all these terms. Can someone explain what's the difference between Classical Mechanics, Relativistic Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory, ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Solving the Three-body problem numerically

I want to create a program in $Mathematica$ that solves numerically the Three-body problem by Euler-Lagrange's equations. I was searching some methods to sucessfully do it. So I found a way to solve ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

In a CMCS 2-body system, why does the speed of the particles after collision stay the same?

A particle $m_1$ is traveling with velocity $v$ toward a stationary particle $m_2$. The velocity of the center of mass is given as $v_c=\frac{m_1}{m_1+m_2}v$. Changing to a moving coordinate system, ...
1
vote
2answers
81 views

Conservation of angular momentum - exercise [on hold]

A sphere of mass $M$ is rotating with constant $w_0$ regarding the axis that intersects the north and south pole of the sphere. A bug of mass $m$ sits on the north pole and starts to walk along a ...
5
votes
1answer
166 views

Liquid column “recoils” in a sealed cylinder when hit by a piston — is it possible?

Consider a cylinder filled partially with a liquid (e.g. water). The cylinder is sealed, and is at held at room temperature (e.g 298K). At equilibrium (or when no external disturbance is imparted to ...
3
votes
1answer
117 views

How do I transform onto a relativistic rotating frame of reference?

In classical mechanics, the usual formula to translate the evolution of a quantity as seen from an inertial frame of reference to a rotational frame is: $$\frac{d \textbf{A} }{dt} \vert_{Inertial} = ...
4
votes
1answer
92 views

How does one express a Lagrangian and Action in the language of forms?

In Lipschitzs Classical Mechanics a Lagrangian is defined as: $L(q,q',t)$ for some trajectory $q(t)$ of a particle And the action is defined as: $S:=\int^a_b L(q,q',t) dt$ How does one ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

The minimum force required to lift a triangular prism [on hold]

If I have an isosceles triangular prism of mass m with the angle at the top being $2\theta$ I want to work out the minimum force I would need to apply to the upper faces to lift the prism. Lets say ...
1
vote
2answers
129 views

Instant centre of rotation for two connected gears

The two gears are have the angular velocities $\omega_1$ and $\omega_2$ respectively with respect to $Oxyz$. The task is to determine the angular velocity $\boldsymbol{\omega}$ of the arm ...
0
votes
2answers
243 views

Advantages/Disadvantages of “hanging off” a motorcycle when leaning

The closest question I could find with regards to this subject was this one: Countersteering a motorcycle However, it does not address the specific physics of what I would like to know. There are 3 ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Hamilton-Jacobi problem

In analytical mechanics by Fasano and Marmi they consider the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a conservative autonomous system in one dimension with the following Hamiltonian, \begin{equation} ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Determine the maximum height a pump can suck up water

I am working on a homework problem that presents the scenario of trying to raise water from a small reservoir of depth 8 m whose surface is 25 m below a pump that can maintain a pressure differential ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Find distance vs. time for a space ship moving through cloud of dust of uniform density [closed]

Here's a problem: We have a cylindrical spaceship with cross-sectional area $A$ moves through a stationary cloud of dust of uniform density $\rho$. Initially the ship has some speed $v_0$ and some ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Jacobi energy function $h$ and the Hamilton $H$ and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation

My understanding of the Jacobi energy function $h$ as defined in Goldstein is that it is the total energy $T+V$ expressed as, \begin{equation} h(q,\dot q,t)=\sum \frac{\partial L}{\partial \dot q}\dot ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

What can I say about a graph depicting orbit a particle has gone through? Acceleration VS friction

I have an orbit in which a particle is told to have gone through. There is a straight part, and a curved part. I am asked to mark the right statements, which are: a. Without any further data, there ...
2
votes
1answer
23 views

Degrees of freedom of a point mass sliding on a rigid curved wire without friction

I am very new to the subject and am going through Structure and Interpretation of Classical Mechanics. One exercise asks to find the degrees of freedom of a number of systems, one of which is a ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

Proving independence of the lagrangian on position of a free particle using the euler-lagrange equation

I asked a similar question some time back but am trying to work this from another angle. In deriving the lagrangian of a free particle, we use the homogeneity of space to conclude that the lagrangian ...
8
votes
1answer
368 views

Reference Request: Classical Mechanics with Symplectic Reduction

I am trying to find a supplement to appendix of Cushman & Bates' book on Global aspects of Classical Integrable Systems, that is less terse and explains mechanics with Lie groups (with dual of Lie ...
7
votes
9answers
2k views

How to explain independence of momentum and energy conservation in elementary terms?

I'm trying to explain to someone learning elementary physics (16 year old) that linear momentum and energy are conserved independently. I'm not a professional physicist and haven't tried to explain ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Maximum range of projectile from elevation, simply?

Let us say you have project a ball at velocity $u$ from a cliff hight $h$, and we want to find the maximum range of the ball. Ok so you could do this using equations of motion (for constant ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

In which direction does mud fly off a moving bike's tire & why?

If a bike moves through a muddy area, mud gets on its tires. Then the mud flies off from the tires. Which forces are acting on it? In which direction does it fly off? On my physics test, I wrote ...
4
votes
3answers
260 views

Runge-Lenz vector and Keplerian Orbits

Is the loss of closed Keplerian orbits in relativistic mechanics directly tied to the absence of the Runge-Lenz vector?
1
vote
2answers
105 views

How do waves have momentum?

A question on a practice test I'm taking is as follows: By shaking one end of a stretched string, a single pulse is generated. The traveling pulse carries: A. mass B. energy C. momentum D. ...
14
votes
2answers
3k views

Deriving the Lagrangian for a free particle

I'm a newbie in physics. Sorry, if the following questions are dumb. I began reading "Mechanics" by Landau and Lifshitz recently and hit a few roadblocks right away. Proving that a free particle ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Lagrangian for free particle in special relativity

From definition of Lagrangian: $L = T - U$. As I understand for free particle ($U = 0$) one should write $L = T$. In special relativity we want Lorentz-invariant action thus we define free-particle ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

How this tube rotates? [duplicate]

I recently seen a video where a tube is spin into space. When it starts to rotate, it keeps continuously to rotate along the axis of 180 degrees clockwise, then 180 counter-clockwise and so on. The ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

name of this bouncing balls separator model

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRGf0Mq2Zwg I want to read the physical and mathematical model of this "bouncing balls separator " in the above link . What is name of this experiment so I can search ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

Relation between magnetic moment and angular momentum — classic theory

How do I prove the relation between the vectors of magnetic moment $\vec\mu$ and angular momentum $\vec L$, $$\vec\mu=\gamma\vec L$$ ? Many text books and lecture notes about the principles of ...
2
votes
3answers
299 views

Is there a quick way of finding the kinetic energy on spherical coordinates?

Assume a particle in 3D euclidean space. Its kinetic energy: $$ T = \frac{1}{2}m\left(\dot x^2 + \dot y^2 + \dot z^2\right) $$ I need to change to spherical coordinates and find its kinetic energy: ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

Pulling on a weakened rope - where will it tear?

Let's say I have a rope of 10m length and it is weakened in 3 spots: at 2.5m, at 5m and at 7.5m. Weakened means that if enough tension is applied it will tear at these points (all points are equally ...
4
votes
4answers
118 views

Classical and quantum systems [closed]

What are the main differences between a quantum and classical system? How does one can distinguish them?
8
votes
1answer
320 views

Vibrational anharmonic coupling and noise-induced spontaneous symmetry breaking in a hexagonal finite mechanical lattice

Happy holidays, everyone! The following is part question, part visual gallery, and part classical mechanics problem. Inspired by snow over the weekend I began simulating the vibrations of the ...
0
votes
2answers
69 views

do the planes of electron orbits make an angle?

if we think as the electrons around the atoms classically, then as the two electrons in the first shell (1s) go around the nucleus; do the planes of orbit make an angle with each other (as an average) ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Deriving lagrangian of a free particle - How do you arrive at Lagrangian independency conclusions

I guess this question has been asked before, but I'm looking at a slightly different aspect. I'm reading Landau's book on classical mechanics. In deriving the lagrangian for a free particle, I ...