Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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How would an increase in temperature affect ooblek's (non newtonian fluid) viscosity?

Due to the fact that Ooblek (cornstarch and water), contains so much water and from what I understand it is non newtonian due to the particles suspended in it, would it therefore be correct to say ...
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2answers
83 views

non constant acceleration problem [closed]

The acceleration of an arrow from a bow falls from $6000m/s^2$ to zero when it leaves the bow after travelling a distance $x=0.75m$. Assuming that this acceleration can be expressed by the linear ...
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36 views

Regarding $f$ degrees of freedom & $f\!-\!1$ constants & inclusion of these constants

In the classic & famous book "Electromagnetic fields & Interactions" by Richard Becker (Dover publishing), on page 55 (of volume 2) , author says: If the system possesses f degrees of ...
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23 views

Calculating the change in aceleration the earth feels when you push an object

I am learning newton's third law, and i got to this conclusion, i wanted to know if it's correct (within the boundaries of Newtonian mechanics) Say I'm pushing a cupboard with my body, and I apply a ...
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49 views

What are the assumptions behind the Lagrangian derivation of energy?

What are the assumptions behind the Lagrangian derivation of energy? I understand that we're searching for a function $L$ that describes a set of physics so that solving the energy minimization ...
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61 views

Physical motivation for Lagrangian formalism

This is more of a request for clarification of understanding and intuition rather than a question, but I hope people can help me with it. I have learned calculus of variations and have subsequently ...
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35 views

Is expectation value of the Hamiltonian always the energy? [duplicate]

There are time dependent & space dependent systems (magnetic fields) and time independent (particle in a box or harmonic oscillator). In the latter the expectation value is the 'average' energy ...
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1answer
49 views

Dynamics of pairwise distances in the $n$-body problem

Consider the $n$-body problem where we are interested in describing the time evolution of $n$ masses interacting through a potential $U$. Let $D$ be the matrix containing all pairwise distances ...
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3answers
80 views

The motion-independent definition of force

I think we must be able to accomodate a definition of a force on some particle which is independent of the motion of the particle, for all kinds of forces, to surely verify the statement like 'force ...
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59 views

Is the principle of indifference enough to derive the microcanonical ensemble?

The microcanonical ensemble is usual motivated solely by the principle of indifference. Textbooks usually say something along the lines of "If the only thing we know about a system is its total ...
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2answers
77 views

Tension and friction. Cool question

I had an exercise like the image, where block A is pulled by a force F, there is that rope(tension) attached to the block B and the wall, and there is friction between A and B, and A and the ground, ...
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4answers
351 views

What are the accelerations of blocks? [closed]

I've talked with 2 teachers about this situation: one teacher said he was completely sure that B have twice the acceleration of A, the other said he was completely sure they have same acceleration. ...
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20 views

Gradient effects in continuum mechanics

What I have learned is that inhomogenous materials (materials with different material properties over space and time) can be treated by the homogenization technique (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
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“Sweet Spot” of Rod-Pendulum - Problem Clarification

I came across this problem in a book (shortened for brevity): Consider a rod of mass $m$ pivoted about one end, with the other end to rotate. Let the center of mass be a distance $a$ from the ...
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1answer
49 views

The ratio of masses in an elastic collision [closed]

Two blocks of mass $M_1$ and $M_2$ moving along a 1-dimensional straight line with velocities $V_1$ and $V_2$, respectively, collide elastically. After the collision they move with respective ...
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40 views

Derivation of Bohr model equations (1) in his original paper

My question is rather straightforward. In his original paper ("On the Constitution of Atoms and Molecules") Bohr provides equations (1) for the frequency and major axis orbit: \begin{align} \omega &...
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2answers
70 views

Projectile motion of a grenade [closed]

A small hand grenade is thrown with an initial speed V0 forming an angle ɵ with the horizontal ground. Assume that at its highest point the grenade explodes and is split into two identical ...
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1answer
25 views

Finding mass with an estimated gravitational force

As asteroids orbit the sun, they experience gravitational force exerted on them by the sun, and they in turn exert a very minute force back on the sun. Because of their small size, asteroids don't tug ...
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2answers
95 views

Do mechanical waves also carry momentum as well as energy? [closed]

I have read that electromagnetic waves carry momentum because they carry energy, while energy is equivalent to mass. So they carry momentum. But this explanation is in the context of special ...
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2answers
93 views

Higher than Lagrangian/action?

When you begin learning physics, you start with equations of motion applied to various physics systems. In classical mechanics course you learn, that exists Lagrangian/action of a system, which gives ...
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41 views

Build Hamiltonian function

Suppose we have three-point system Points A and B are connected with rod of fixed length $r_0$. Point C rotates around rod, vector R begins at rod's centre of mass. There is a potential of general ...
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95 views

Simple real life applications of Euler-Lagrange equations of motion

If you read some introductory mechanics text like David Morin's Introduction to Classical Mechanics about Euler Lagrange Equations you get a large amount of simple examples like the "moving plane" (...
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29 views

Interpretation of contourplot pendulum

I've made this plot of a function that evaluates the size of the angle on the x-axis, and the velocity of the angle for the pendulum on the y-axis. I'm having a hard time interpreting the meaning of ...
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29 views

Reversibility principle for classical mechanic

I'm studying this colloquium about quantum fluctuation relations for nonlinear thermodynamic, but I'm having a problem. Reading about the principle of micro-reversibility of the dynamic of a system i ...
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2answers
51 views

Is the wave equation a periodic wave equation?

I have seen that in the derivation of wave equation, they always use the periodic property of waves in the derivation. But what about non-periodic waves? Do they have some different wave equation? Is ...
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91 views

A Canonical Transformation that deletes one canonical coordinate?

I am self studying some classical mechanics, and came across a problem in Goldstein that has me stumped. It is problem 1 in chapter 10. It basically says "Given some conservative system show that a ...
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2answers
70 views

What information am I losing out when I assume that the displacement in S.H.M. is small?

While making calculations for simple harmonic motion, we take the force as $F=F(x)$. Then we use Taylor's expansion and calculate as follows: $$\begin{align} F(x) &=F(0+x) \\ & = F(0)+xF'(0)+...
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1answer
36 views

Why does the kinetic energy of a particle moving in circular motion increase when the turn radius decreases and no torque is acting?

Why does the kinetic energy of a particle moving in circular motion increase when the turn radius decreases and there is no torque acting? E.g. if a planet is rotating about its axis and it shrinks to ...
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1answer
90 views

Why does the magnitude of linear momentum of a particle in circular motion change with radius? [duplicate]

My problem is with linear momentum of a particle in circular motion. If we imagine a particle moving around a circle, if there are no torques acting, then we can say its angular momentum is conserved, ...
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35 views

Relative angular momentum?

Let there be a point $P$. A point $C$ is located at a radius vector $r$ from $P$. $C$ is the centre of mass of a rigid body. The rigid body is rotating with an angular velocity $\omega$ about an axis $...
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1answer
26 views

Does stretching a spring with a relatively high spring constant value require more force because of its inertia?

Other than the fact that a spring has a relatively high spring constant (say 1000 N/m) and therefore requires more force per meter to stretch (not bend or twist).
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20 views

Ring Ascending a Step

Consider a thin circular ring of mass $m$, radius $r$ rolling without slipping with velocity $v$ towards a step of height $h$ $(<r)$. Assume no rebound and no slipping at the time of contact. What ...
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1answer
32 views

How does the viscosity of a non Newtonian fluid (ooblek) affect its resistance to electricity?

I know the conductivity of water is based on whatever is dissolved into the solution, hence pure water does not conduct electricity. However, these ions in solution must also be free to move around. ...
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1answer
52 views

Magnetic field of rotating capacitor [duplicate]

Does the rotating charged capacitor (both plates) produce magnetic field? and what about rotating both plates in opposite directions?
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81 views

Which makes for a better equivalent capacitor? In series or in parrallel? [on hold]

I understand how capacitors in series and in parallel work. However, I am wondering if it makes a difference, in terms of making a better capacitor that can store more charge, would you connect them ...
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1answer
73 views

Is the acceleration due to a fictitious force independent of mass in general?

Intuitively (at least to me) it seems that the answer should be "yes", since a fictitious force arises due to being in a non-inertial frame; the frame is accelerating, but the objects within this ...
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1answer
44 views

Angular momentum consevation and central force

A circular orbit of radius $a$ passing through the centre of a central force is given by the equation $r=2a\cos\theta$. Then using the orbit equation one can show that the force varies as $\vec F(|\...
0
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1answer
38 views

Acceleration of moving reference frame

I want to simulate the readings of an accelerometer that is arbitrarily moved through 3D space. In an inertial reference frame $W$, the motion of the accelerometer is described by it's linear ...
3
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2answers
34 views

Current loop and direction ambiguity of the magnetic moment

Consider a circular loop in the XY-plane which carries a current $I$. Then it behaves as a magnetic dipole with moment $\textbf{m}=I\int d\textbf{S}$ where $\int d\textbf{S}$ is the area of the loop ...
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0answers
36 views

Euler-Lagrange problem of single mass double pendulum in plane [closed]

Problem: "A rod with a length of $l$, mass $m$, is attached by a thread of length $l/2$ according to figure. The rod may perform small, planar swings. Determine its eigen-frequencies." Figure: ...
1
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1answer
57 views

Massless ladder against a frictionless wall [closed]

I am confused by a review problem for my physics course. I keep getting a different answer from the solution (which was given to us) and not sure what I am missing. A massless ladder has a length of $...
3
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1answer
53 views

Deriving Hamilton's equations from KdV Hamiltonian

Let $f=f(q,p)$, $g=g(q,p)$ and Possion bracket $$\{f,g\}=\frac{\partial f}{\partial q}\frac{\partial g}{\partial p}-\frac{\partial f}{\partial p}\frac{\partial g}{\partial q}. \tag{1}$$ Then Hamilton'...
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1answer
52 views

relationship between torque and potential energy for electromagnetism

It is well known that the energy of a magnetic dipole in a magnetic field is taken as $U = - \bf{m}.\bf{B}$. The dipole also experiences a torque $\bf{\tau = m \times B}$. In classical mechanics the ...
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0answers
37 views

How to calculate the forces that create precessing motion of a spinning top?

I'm trying to create a a spinning top simulation, and I have a problem with simulating the precession. I read the Wiki article about precession, which have the formula for angular velocity of ...
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0answers
37 views

Meaning of centrifugal term in the mechanical energy of a orbiting planet [duplicate]

For a planet under the effect of gravitational force the mechanical energy can be written as $$E=\frac{1}{2}\mu {\dot{r}}^2+\frac{L^2}{2\mu r^2}-\gamma \frac{m M}{r^2} \tag{1}$$ Where $\mu$ is the ...
0
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2answers
51 views

Position, velocity and acceleration vs time graphs

I'd like to draw graphs of a vehicle and I have a position vs time table. I can set the points but how am I supposed to join them, straight or hyperbole ? If the object is accelerating which is yes ...
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0answers
38 views

Are physical functions always differentiable [duplicate]

I know that physicist usually don't really think too much about differentiabillity of functions. Usually there are at most finite many points where functions aren't differentiable and if there are ...
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0answers
74 views

Derive Galilean transformation. (The meaning of the relativity)

In the book The meaning of the relativity Einstein says that in classic mechanics two postulates are previously supposed: 1.- The time is absolute. 2.- The longitude is absolute. And this implies ...
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2answers
74 views

Free particle and harmonic oscillator coupled

I'm currently playing with a toy model given by the Lagrangian $$L=\frac{m\dot{x}^2}{2}+\frac{m\dot{y}^2}{2}+\frac{1}{2}m\omega^2x^2+x y,$$ which is basically a free particle (described by $y(t)$) and ...
5
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0answers
71 views

Why are vibrations so common? [closed]

Why are vibrations so common? We all know, or pretend to know, that symmetries and the least action principle lead to conservation laws.Is there something more fundamental behind the fact that ...