Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
0answers
46 views

Higher order principle of isotropy

Let us work with classical mechanics in the substantivalist metaphysics, that is, space and time are seen as absolute. Call $n$-th order of motion any observer such that $n$ is the biggest order of ...
1
vote
0answers
87 views

When to use Hamiltonian vs Lagrangian?

I currently studying the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms in classical mechanics, but something I'm not seeing is how do I know which one to use in a given problem? After I find the Lagrangian, ...
1
vote
2answers
150 views

Does the superposition principle affect the space of quantum states?

I am confused about the set of quantum states. I have seen it written that in classical physics, the set of all states is a simplex. (I think this refers to the probability simplex.) In quantum ...
2
votes
1answer
182 views

Lagrangian, Kinetic & Potential energy with two masses connected to three springs

Two masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ are on a frictionless surface. They are connected by three springs with constants $k_1,k_2,k_3$. $k_1$ and $k_3$ are attached to walls and $k_2$ is between the masses. $k_1$ ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Does it take more effort to move against earth's rotation?

I know that if we stand still, we are traveling at 0 m/s relative to the Earth. But if we move against the rotation of the Earth we lower our speed, so, wouldn't we have to fight against the ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Continuity Equation for Momentum

Momentum is a conserved quantity, which makes me wonder if we can write an equation for the local conservation of momentum in the form of a continuity equation. If we're considering a system of ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Derivation of Newton-Euler equations of motion

I am in search of a simplified version of the derivation of Newton-Euler equations of motion (both translational and rotational) for a rigid body (3D block) that has a body fixed frame and where the ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Optimal “Blow up” Configuration

Suppose you have three balls glued together. Two are red and one is blue. The system of balls is blown up by an explosion of pure energy (that conserves the center of mass frame) exactly at the ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Lagrangian formalism (demonstration)

My question is about the multiplicity of the Lagrangian to a Physics system. I pretend to demonstrate the following proposition: For a system with $n$ degrees of freedom, written by the ...
1
vote
2answers
175 views

Adding a total time derivative term to the Lagrangian

This is proof that $L'$ represents same equation of motion with $L$ through Lagrange eq. I understand $L'$ satisfies Lagrange eq, but how does this proof mean $L'$ and $L$ describe same motion of ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

What is a point transformation?

This problem comes from Goldstein. What does $s=e^{\gamma t}q$ mean? Do I just put $q=e^{-\gamma t}s$ into the Lagrangian? But I don't know what that means. I think the point transformation may ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Effect of Eath's rotation on a ball thrown upwards

Since the Earth is rotating it should have acceleration (in the sense that there is change in direction of velocity). So if we throw a ball upwards won't this acceleration affect its trajectory in ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

How to visualize the holonormic constraint $(\vec r_i - \vec r_j)^2 - c_{ij}^2$ = 0

A holonormic $(\vec r_i - \vec r_j)^2 - c_{ij}^2$ = 0 appears in Goldstein's Classical Mechanics Pg 12. Where $i$, and $j$ are particles, however $c_{ij}$ is not defined. How someone deduce the ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

What is the conserved quantity?

Lagrangian $$ \mathcal{L}=\frac{1}{2}mv^2-q\Phi + q\textbf{A} \cdot \textbf{v} $$ is invariant under infinitesimal spatial rotation. In the process of calculating $\delta\mathcal{L}$, the term ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

A rod on an inclined plane

(55th Polish Olympiad in Physics) A rod of length $l$ and mass $m$ was lain on an inclined plane of angle $\alpha$, on the altitude $h$ above the floor. (while $h \gg l)$ Describe the rod's ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

A free axis of rotation

It is claimed that the free axes of rotation of a rigid body are the ones with the smallest and the largest moment of inertia. Why? How can we determine which free axis of rotation will be used?
1
vote
2answers
61 views

Metric and the Lagrangian [duplicate]

Does the Lagrangian formalism require a metric on the configuration manifold $Q$ in order to define a Lagrangian $L$ on the tangent bundle $TQ$? Further, if we specify a metric on the tangent bundle ...
0
votes
0answers
54 views

How does Zeno of Elea's argument on “motion” make sense? [duplicate]

Zeno of Elea (born c. 500 bce) argued so intensely about motion. In one of his arguments he claims – in simple language – "that it is impossible to slap somebody, since the hand first has to travel ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Every Galilean transformation can be written as the composition of rotation, translation, and uniform motion

Having heard many good things about Arnold's Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics, I picked it up and started going through it. While I think I understand all of the definitions he makes, the ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Determine the coefficient of static friction of a box

I have thought about a way to determine the coefficient of static friction of a box with centre of mass $c$. A force $\vec{F_e}$ acts on it at $c$. If I choose $c$ as my origin for a cartesian ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

The g-force of common objects hitting the floor

At my friend's work they have an accelerometer which measures the force with which certain objects hit the ground. He claims that from four feet high, cell phones hit a solid metal surface with a ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Translation of the Mechanique analytique [closed]

Is there an English translation of the Mechanique analytique by Lagrange that is free? I have tried searching up online, however I only get French originals. The English translations seem all to be ...
2
votes
2answers
784 views

Is the change in kinetic energy of a particle frame independent?

Intuitively, I would expect the change in kinetic energy of a particle to be frame independent. It just doesn't "feel" right that between two points in time-space, one frame should measure a change in ...
5
votes
8answers
1k views

Can we explain Newton's first law mathematically?

At constant speed there is no acceleration. $(f'(x)=v'=0=a)$ .If $a=0$ then $F=ma=0$ and therefore no force acts on the object so the object will continue in the same direction, if any. This is only ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

What is the function type of the generalized momentum?

Let $$L:{\mathbb R}^n\times {\mathbb R}^n\times {\mathbb R}\to {\mathbb R}$$ denote the Lagrangian (it should be differentiable) of a classical system with $n$ spatial coordinates. In the action ...
6
votes
5answers
745 views

Noether Theorem and Energy conservation in classical mechanics

I have a problem deriving the conservation of energy from time translation invariance. The invariance of the Lagrangian under infinitesimal time displacements $t \rightarrow t' = t + \epsilon$ can be ...
27
votes
4answers
6k views

Blowing your own sail?

How it this possible? Even if the gif is fake, the Mythbusters did it and with a large sail it really moves forward. What is the explanation?
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Lagrange equation and a force derivable from a generalized potential

I was reading the solution of this exercise and I have a doubt: A point particle moves in space under the influence of a force derivable from a generalized potential of the form $$U(r,v) = ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Brachistochrone parametric equations

I'm having a bit of a hard time understanding how the parametrized $y$ equation (given below) of the brachistochrone is correct. When these equations are plotted it gives a concave down graph. ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Angular velocity and instantaneous rotation axis

Let's suppose that we have a cylinder of moment of inertia $I$ rolling on the floor without sliding, moving with linear velocity $v$ and rotating around an axis passing through the center of mass with ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Amplitude-Frequency curve

Given a resonance curve just like this: Could someone explain to me what the physical meaning of the intersection with the ordinate is? At first glance I would say it has to be $(0 | 0) $ since ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a formula that gives the position of an object depending on the time, but which doesn't allow the object to surpass the speed of light?

I have found these two formulas: $v = at + v_0$ $x = \frac{1}{2}at^2 + v_0t + x_0$ a is the acceleration v is the velocity x is the position t is the time $v_0$ is the initial velocity $x_0$ is ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Are launch angles relative to observers?

Supposed we have someone on a moving platform which is at constant velocity. Lets say the person launches a mass at some speed relative to the platform an some angle with respect to the platform. Does ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Show $\frac{\partial T}{\partial \dot q_j} = m_i \dot r_i^T\frac{\dot r_i }{\partial \dot q_j} $ [closed]

This is a basic result in lagrangian mecanics. Let $T$ be the kinetic energy, $r_i$ be the position of the $i^{th}$ particle in the system I need to show $$\frac{\partial T}{\partial \dot q_j} = ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

What is this equation $f^e = f^a - \nabla U$?

Recently in a mechanics class my prof scribbled down something looked like $$f^e = f^a - \nabla U.$$ Where he claimed $f^e$ is the external force on an object, $f^a$ is the applied force on the ...
4
votes
1answer
102 views

Can someone explain intuitively how, for a Galilean universe, $A^4$ is equivalent to $\Bbb{R} \times \Bbb{R}^3$?

I am reading Arnold's book on classical mechanics. Obviously, everyone who's studied basic physics feels comfortable with $\Bbb{R} \times \Bbb{R}^3$. This is just a pair $(t,\mathbf{x})$. There are ...
3
votes
1answer
50 views

Black hole repulsion mechnism

Schwarzschild radius of black hole is proportional to its mass. From here we can deduce that black hole density getting lower as black hole grows in pace that is inverse to the square of mass. If it ...
1
vote
3answers
213 views

Why is it easier to go uphill on a lower gear?

In cars as well as bicycles, when we are on a lower gear, the driving wheel (the one on the wheels) has a bigger radius compared to when on a higher gear. So on a lower gear the bike/car would move ...
3
votes
1answer
82 views

Lagrangian vector field expression

The Lagrangian vector field $X_L$ on the tangent bundle is given in page 4 of Marco Mazzucchelli's "critical Point Theory for Lagrangian systems" to be; \begin{equation} ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Aircraft Level Flight Trajectory

An aircraft climbs to 15000 feet and enters 'level flight' phase. My basic knowledge of physics says that forces on the aircraft at this time are balanced - as seen in this diagram. Would an ...
2
votes
1answer
32 views

Comparing Brachistochrone curve with a Hypocycloid curve

I want to compare the time that it takes to slide a particle in a frictionless hypocycloid curve, so time would be given by the arclength divided by the velocity So I need first compute the ...
2
votes
2answers
121 views

Hamiltonian from a Lagrangian with constraints?

Let's say I have the Lagrangian: $$L=T-V.$$ Along with the constraint that $$f\equiv f(\vec q,t)=0.$$ We can then write: $$L'=T-V+\lambda f. $$ What is my Hamiltonian now? Is it $$H'=\dot q_i p_i ...
1
vote
2answers
112 views

Do rotation matrices rotate about inertial or body angles? [closed]

I have Yaw, pitch, and roll angles in that order (Euler 321) to apply to a body reference frame in cartesian coordinate system. I want to know what the body reference frame vector coordinates are ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Particle disintegration (Landau & Lifshitz)

In the particle disintegration problem in the book by Landau and Lifshit(z), it is considered a particle with velocity $\vec{V}$ in the lab frame, which disintegrates into two particles with masses ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

The principle of least action [duplicate]

I have read about the principle of least action. This principle suggests that nature would allow a particle to travel in a path along which the integral of the difference between kinetic energy and ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Showing time-invariance of Lagrangian with time-displacement operator

I am trying to show that the time-invariance of the Lagrangian of a simple one-particle system implies energy conservation for that system. The first step is, well, to show that the Lagrangian is ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Boundary of classical and quantum world

So we know that for the really small world we have quantum mechanical behavior and for big things we have classical behavior. But what is the boundary that differentiates the two? If we make a thought ...
5
votes
2answers
171 views

Breaking the Laws of Physics? (Walter Lewin rotation experiment)

Lately i have been watching the MIT Physics Lectures from Dr. Walter Lewin. I find his passion while teaching very fascinating and inspiring. Any way, in the end of the lecture about Torque he showed ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Thermal de Broglie wave length

If we refer to this wiki page thermal de Broglie wave length, we can see there are two expressions. One is derived using equipartition theorem, which makes perfect sense. The other one used $\pi kT$ ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

How did Feynman derive the physics of medallion vs. plate wobble rate?

I am referring to this: Within a week I was in the cafeteria and some guy, fooling around, throws a plate in the air. As the plate went up in the air I saw it wobble, and I noticed the red ...