Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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Is it possible to cut harder material with a less hard material?

Is it possible to cut harder material with a less hard material - for example cut a steel rod with iron blade ?
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91 views

Lagrangian mechanics is different form Newtonian? [duplicate]

I am a post graduate student and had completed my classical Mechanics with Newtonian mechanics to Hamiltonian mechanics. I have better understanding of Newtonian, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian. But I ...
2
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1answer
121 views

Why is the gravitational field potential scalar?

On page 48 of Carroll's Spacetime and Geometry he, before introducing "gravity as geometry", discusses the classical Newtonian equation: $F_{g}=-m_{g} \nabla \Phi$ This equation is very straight ...
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0answers
28 views

Difference between marginally stable and marginally bound orbits

I have some difficulty understanding what marginally stable and marginally bound orbits are. This is what I have understood: Stable orbits: Stable orbits occur when the 2nd derivative of effective ...
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2answers
119 views

Is angular frequency dependent on time in damped harmonic motion?

I have a doubt regarding the angular frequency of a harmonic oscillator when there is damping involved. The frequency of the oscillation changes with time in the case of damping, but I haven't seen ...
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0answers
55 views

Showing the Hamiltonian of the $\alpha$ FPU is real

I am studying the $\alpha$ FPU chain which is a model of coupled oscillators with small non-linearity. For these systems, I derived the following Hamiltonian $H$ which is given by $$ H=\sum_{j=1}^{N} ...
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6answers
2k views

Degree of freedom paradox for a rigid body

Suppose we consider a rigid body, which has $N$ particles. Then the number of degrees of freedom is $3N - (\mbox{# of constraints})$. As the distance between any two points in a rigid body is fixed, ...
4
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3answers
82 views

Motion on a frictionless vertical sinusoidal track

Today during lesson, my mechanics teacher provided a diagram of a "bowl" of the following shape: The top left and the top right have the same height, and the top right part is horizontal. He ...
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4answers
475 views

Question about canonical transformation

I was going through my professor's notes about Canonical transformations. He states that a canonical transformation from $(q, p)$ to $(Q, P)$ is one that if which the original coordinates obey ...
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1answer
48 views

Is a motor HP torque directly proportional to the increasing HP among identical motors?

Say you have three motors: Motor 1 = .10 HP with x torque, performing task A Motor 2 = 1 HP with y torque, performing task A Motor 3 = 10 HP with z torque, performing task A If the motors are the ...
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3answers
86 views

If a body is floating in a static fluid, then the volume of the displaced fluid equal to the volume of the inmerse part of the object (proof)

Suppose an arbitrary body is floating in a static fluid, either totally or partially immersed in it, then the volume of the displaced fluid equal to the volume of the immersed fraction of the object. ...
2
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1answer
75 views

Equation of motion for system of springs

I need to find the equations of motion for the following system. If $x_1$ is $m_1$'s extension and $x_2$ is $m_2$'s, then, I feel like for $m_1$ we just need to consider $x_1$ giving $$m_1 a_1 = ...
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2answers
1k views

What are the expressions for rotational and translational kinetic energies of a system of point particles?

Consider a system of point particles , where the mass of particle $i$ is $\mu_i$ and its position vector is $r_i$. What are the expressions for translational kinetic energy and rotational kinetic ...
3
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1answer
510 views

Rotating/Translating Disk

I was trying to understand an aspect of rotational dynamics and thought of a problem to help me learn. I'm sure this problem has been considered by countless people in the past, but I'm having some ...
2
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1answer
38 views

Sympletic transformation and Hamiltonian function

Let's say that $x:=(p,q)$ is a trajectory in phase space and $$x'(t) = J \nabla H(x(t))$$ are Hamilton's equation of motion. Now I transform $F: M \rightarrow N, x \mapsto y(x)$ diffeomorphic to some ...
3
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1answer
51 views

Initial conditions in classical mechanics

In classical mechanics, specifying the initial coordinates and velocities of all particles uniquely determines the system's future; we do not need to specify accelerations or higher derivatives. Can ...
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0answers
27 views

What forces are involved to enable a rock to skip in water?

Does the surface tension matter or is it something else that is providing the upward force? Can someone explain the phenomenon to me physically?
5
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2answers
532 views

Is it really impossible to calculate in advance the result of throwing dice?

Is it really impossible to calculate in advance the result of throwing dice? After all, the physics of dice throwing is in the world of classical mechanics, rather than quantum mechanics.
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0answers
30 views

Optimal size of a windmill for a given windspeed

Here is the problem: Assume that you have some constant wind speed. I want to run a windmill but I need to decide how big a windmill I want. The size is characterized by the length of the blades, $r$. ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Simplifying Friedmann's Equation

So we have one of Friedmann's equation: $$\rho_c = \frac{3H^2}{8\pi G}$$ Using This website, resources where gathered for specific times in the universe. The resources being the Hubble constant at ...
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1answer
71 views

Do waves accelerate?

Typically we think of acceleration as a particulate property but a previous question on this forum got me thinking. If we think of a wave increasing its velocity by increasing its energy/frequency ...
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0answers
34 views

Effect of an asymmetric weight distribution on a hack squat machine

In a hack squat machine (see figure above), does it matter if I put more washers on one side? May this asymmetry cause an asymmetry of my effort in performing this exercise? For example, if I put ...
23
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4answers
5k views

Blowing your own sail?

How it this possible? Even if the gif is fake, the Mythbusters did it and with a large sail it really moves forward. What is the explanation?
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0answers
27 views

Restricted three body problem

I have the restricted three body problem, which corresponds, to the equation $ \ddot a-2\dot b -a= \displaystyle\frac{\partial U}{\partial a} $ $ \ddot b +2 \dot a-b = \displaystyle\frac{\partial ...
3
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3answers
284 views

Does the variation of the Lagrangian satisfy the product rule and chain rule of the derivative?

I have seen wikipedia use the product rule and maybe the chain rule for the variation of the Langragin as follows: \begin{align} \dfrac{\delta [f(g(x,\dot{x}))h(x,\dot{x})] } {\delta x} = \left( ...
3
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2answers
123 views

Why does pitch in a helicopter take effect 90 degrees later?

In a helicopter if you want to give it a forward pitch, you change the angle of the blades when it is in this position ---- So the two blades experience unequal lift and because o gyroscopic ...
7
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1answer
235 views

Quantum version of the Galton Board

If classical particles fall through a Galton Board they pile up in the limit of large numbers like a normal distribution, see e.g. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GaltonBoard.html What kind of ...
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0answers
38 views

Confusion regarding a method of writing constraint equations

I came across a method for writing the constraint equations known as "The Virtual Work Method".I am quoting the exact language of the text(well,not exactly the exact)- Consider the atwood machine ...
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0answers
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2
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1answer
48 views

Why do we exclude the $(i,i)$ case when summing over internal forces?

In the majority of the literature and lectures I see when a system of particles is involved, I usually see the following expression (or similar) for the total force on particle $i$: $$\vec{F}_i = ...
2
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3answers
130 views

Virtual Work: How is the applied force related to the coordinates chosen?

I have a question after reading a section from Goldstein's Classical Mechanics. The question deals with equation 1.43 in the text (given below): $$ \tag{1.43} \sum\limits_{i} {\bf F}_i^{(a)}\cdot ...
0
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1answer
92 views

How a fan moves air? [duplicate]

How does a fan moves air towards you (I mean in 1 direction). Also propeller and fan have different shapes, does it mean they work different?
0
votes
1answer
76 views

Why can't angular momentum be used in flying vehicles?

If angular momentum (L) works like this animation from Wikipedia leads me to believe, why can't we put a large flywheel or several small ones on a chassis, all rotating counter-clockwise around ...
1
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0answers
39 views

Can a harmonic drive reducer/strain wave gear be used to gear up instead of down? [closed]

I wish to be able to gear up from a rotating bicycle hub with a revolutions per minute range of 150 to 850 to a ratio of 200:1. Can I do this by simply reversing the direction of a harmonic drive ...
2
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1answer
67 views

Calculating coefficient of friction

Consider a body attached to a horizontal spring and resting on a surface, inclined at an angle $\theta$ from the ground. The spring constant is $k$. Initially the spring was kept in its ...
33
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5answers
4k views

What are washers for? [closed]

When you attach a bolt to something using a nut, it is clear what the roles of the nut and bold are. The more you tighten the bolt the more secure your fastening. However, you are often also told ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Example of Hamilton's Principle to Systems with Constraints (Goldstein)

I'm currently studying Goldstein's Classical Mechanics book and I can't get my head around his reasoning in section 2.4. (Extending Hamilton's principle to systems with constraints). I'd like to ...
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1answer
45 views

How is force exerted on a wall equal to derivative of hamiltonian with respect to wall position?

I'm trying to understand a solution of a problem in Landau, Lifshitz "Quantum mechanis. Non-relativistic theory" in $\S22$ "The potential well": Determine the pressure exerted on the walls of a ...
6
votes
1answer
112 views

Time inversion for Euler equation in fluid dynamics

Consider Euler equation for continuum body: $$\frac{\partial u^i}{\partial t}+\mathbf u\cdot \nabla u^i=- \frac{1}{\rho} \frac{\partial p}{\partial x^i} $$ where $\rho$ is the mass density, $p$ is ...
2
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0answers
110 views

Hoop rolling inside a circular hole

A hoop of radius $b$ and mass $m$ rolls without slipping within a stationary circular hole of radius $a > b$ and is subject to gravity. Use the generalized coordinates the rotation angle $\phi$ of ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Integrals of Motion for s Degrees of Freedom

From Landau & Lifshitz, Classical Mechanics, the number of integrals of independent integrals of motion for a system of $s$ degrees of freedom is $2s-1$. I am considering a spherical pendulum in ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

Does one really need classical physics in order to understand quantum physics? [closed]

I want to start studying quantum mechanics, and then move to quantum field theory. I have a strong mathematical background, and I think this aspect of quantum physics won't be a problem to me. Though, ...
0
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0answers
20 views

Perfectly vertical spinning top [duplicate]

Consider a non-spinning top. If a top is perfectly vertical, and the interface between its base and the ground is perfectly flat, it should stay in (unstable) equilibrium. I.e. it does fall. What ...
0
votes
1answer
233 views

A pendulum's rope swings and strikes a peg [closed]

So I have this problem, as far as I can tell I solved it correctly, and it's not equal to any of my answer choices. The problem is: A rope of length $L$ is attached at one end to a ceiling and at ...
14
votes
1answer
295 views

The natural metric of a phase space and the Lyapunov exponent

For me, it seems that there is no apparent metric on a phase space of a dynamical system. Of course one can naively define an Euclidean metric on it, but it seems that this metric has not much to do ...
5
votes
7answers
6k views

What will happen if a plane trys to take off whilst on a treadmill?

So this has puzzled me for many a year... I still am no closer to coming to a conclusion, after many arguments that is. I don't think it can, others 100% think it will. If you have a plane trying to ...
-3
votes
1answer
84 views

If it takes less than a year to accelerate to the speed of light at 1g why will it take the Voyager 10,000 years to reach Alpha Centauri?

Today I was doing my physics homework and there was a problem involving a space ship falling at 9.8 m/(s^2) to simulate gravity, and it asked how long would it take for the ship to reach to speed of ...
1
vote
1answer
123 views

Difference between Hamiltonian in classical Mechanics and in quantum Mechanics

I have a question about difference between Hamiltonian function (the description of system in classical physics) and the Hamiltonian operator (quantum mechanics). I think that there two different ...
3
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1answer
138 views

Geometric mechanics - Symplecticity

I am just trying to wade through literature on classical mechanics and I really don't know where to start, everything is Fibre bundle this or manifold that, and doesn't really ease you in to the ...
5
votes
2answers
141 views

Energy and momentum as partial derivatives of on-shell action in field theory

According to L&L, if we fix the initial position of a particle at a given time and consider the on-shell action as a function of the final coordinates and time, $S(q_1, \ldots, q_n, t)$, then... ...