Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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Classical results proved using quantum mechanics

Are there any results in classical mechanics that are easier to show by deriving a corresponding result in quantum mechanics and then taking the limit as $\hbar\rightarrow0$? (Are there classical ...
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3answers
921 views

Lagrangian mechanics and time derivative on general coordinates

I am reading a book on analytical mechanics on Lagrangian. I get a bit idea on the method: we can use any coordinates and write down the kinetic energy $T$ and potential $V$ in terms of the general ...
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2answers
2k views

Whats the anti-torque mechanism in horizontal take-off aircraft?

In most helicopters there is the anti-torque tail rotor to prevent the body from spinning in the opposite direction to the main rotor. What's the equivalent mechanism in horizontal takeoff single ...
0
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1answer
142 views

Hollow stone columns provide more support?

In history class in elementary school I remember learning that the Greeks would build their stone columns hollow because they thought this provided more support. Is it true that a hollow column is ...
16
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5answers
442 views

Does the mass point move?

There is a question regarding basic physical understanding. Assume you have a mass point (or just a ball if you like) that is constrained on a line. You know that at $t=0$ its position is $0$, i.e., ...
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3answers
323 views

Runge-Lenz vector and Keplerian Orbits

Is the loss of closed Keplerian orbits in relativistic mechanics directly tied to the absence of the Runge-Lenz vector?
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1answer
7k views

Finding the acceleration at an angle

"What's the maximum acceleration you can achieve in a a water-slide at a 34 degree angle (If you can't use your arms and legs)"? This is the free-body-diagram that I drew, assuming $g = 10m/s^2$: ...
4
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2answers
409 views

Higher order covariant Lagrangian

I'm in search of examples of Lagrangian, which are at least second order in the derivatives and are covariant, preferable for field theories. Up to now I could only find first-order (such at ...
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2answers
300 views

Resolution of vectors

What is the fundamental basis of resolution of vector. Suppose we have a vector $\vec{mg}$, now we resolve it into two components, horizontal and vertical. My question is what is the basis for telling ...
5
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2answers
274 views

Hooke's Law, Phase Space and Classical Geometry

Hooke's Law tells us that $m\ddot{x} = -kx$. We can apply the chain rule to rewrite $\ddot{x}$ as follows: $$\frac{\operatorname{d}\!^2x}{\operatorname{d}\!t^2} = ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Is a heavier skier faster? [duplicate]

Is it true that a heavier skier goes faster? If it is, why is that? My intuition would be that the speed gained by a skier should be independent from its mass, since both its acceleration and the ...
4
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1answer
220 views

(Re-)use of a space elevator (basic mechanics and potential energy source)

It's said that if a space elevator were made then it would be much more efficient to put objects in orbit. I've always wondered about the durability of a space elevator though. I don't mean the ...
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4answers
6k views

What's the real fundamental definition of energy?

Some physical quantities like position, velocity, momentum and force, have precise definition even on basic textbooks, however energy is a little confusing for me. My point here is: using our ...
0
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2answers
804 views

FWHM in resonance amplitude square derivation

Consider a linear harmonic oscillator subject to a periodic force: $$ \ddot x + 2 \beta \dot x + \omega _0 ^2x = f_0\cos \omega t$$ The solution tends to: $$A \cos (\omega t - \delta)$$ where: ...
5
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1answer
311 views

Mechanical shock resistance as a function of shape

I have a system where I'm dropping glass tubes filled with some sample from a certain height, along a track. I can apply a back-pressure of air to push them down faster, and in general the faster they ...
4
votes
2answers
478 views

Conservation of Linear Momentum at the point of collision

This is a pretty basic conceptual question about the conservation of linear momentum. Consider an isolated system of 2 fixed-mass particles of masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ moving toward each other with ...
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2answers
407 views

effect of vertical collision on kinetic friction and subsequent change in horizontal velocity

Suppose somehow a block of mass $m$ is moving on ground, and the coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the block is $\mu_k$. If I drop a tennis ball(of same mass) on it from a ...
0
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4answers
2k views

How do you tell what forces do no work?

The total mass of the children and the toboggan is 66 kg. The force the parent exerts is 58 N (18 degrees above the horizontal). What 3 forces/ components do no work on the toboggan? I said the ...
2
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1answer
206 views

Is there a geometrical way to obtain a relationship between these vectors?

Suppose we have a setup like this. Here $a_1,a_2,b_1,b_2$ are acceleration magnitudes($b_1,b_2$ being relative) and $P,Q,R,S$ are not pulley/blocks but are points on the rope. If I use a geometrical ...
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1answer
827 views

Intuition behind classical virial theorem

I am continuing to brush up my statistical physics. I just want to gain a better understanding. I have gone through the derivation of the classical virial theorem once more. I have thought about it, ...
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1answer
457 views

Intuition behind Work

I have a doubt in understanding the intuition behind the concept of work. First of all, I think this isn't duplicate, I've searched on the site, and the closest thing I've found was this post which is ...
12
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1answer
498 views

Reference Request: Classical Mechanics with Symplectic Reduction

I am trying to find a supplement to appendix of Cushman & Bates' book on Global aspects of Classical Integrable Systems, that is less terse and explains mechanics with Lie groups (with dual of Lie ...
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6answers
15k views

Why does higher acceleration minimize a car's fuel consumption?

I generally try to optimize my car's fuel consumption when driving, using my car's real-time MPG gauge and average-trip MPG indicator. Until recently, I believed the slower the acceleration, the ...
1
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1answer
95 views

kinetic energy of the stone

Suppose we have a man traveling in an open car (roof open) with speed $v$ towards right (man faces right). He throws a stone (mass $m$) towards right, in his frame-forward with speed $V$. In the ...
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1answer
152 views

Deriving equations of motion of polymer chain with Hamilton's equations

This is related to a question about a simple model of a polymer chain that I have asked yesterday. I have a Hamiltonian that is given as: $H = \sum\limits_{i=1}^N \frac{p_{\alpha_i}^2}{2m} + ...
3
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2answers
198 views

Universe Expansion and two tennis balls

Clear the universe of all matter except for two tennis balls. Place the two tennis balls in the same inertial frame 1 Mpc apart. Are the tennis balls getting further apart? Will the tennis balls ...
2
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1answer
315 views

Hamiltonian of polymer chain

I'm reading up on classical mechanics. In my book there is an example of a simple classical polymer model, which consists of N point particles that are connected by nearest neighbor harmonic ...
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0answers
483 views

Maximum Shear on a Beam - beam with fixed support on one end and hinge on other end

A beam $\displaystyle 3m$ long with fixed support on one end and hinge on the other end is subjected to a uniform load of $10\ kN/m$. What is the maximum shear of this beam? The solution is this one: ...
3
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2answers
507 views

Cantilever Beam - Maximum Shear of the Beam

A cantilever beam $3\ \text{m}$ long is subjected to a moment of $10\ \text{kNm}$ at the free end. Find the maximum shear of the beam. The answer is "There is no vertical load, shear is zero" ...
3
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3answers
977 views

Relating generalized momentum, generalized velocity, and kinetic energy: $2T~=~\sum_i p_{i}\dot{q}^{i}$

According to equation (6) on the first page of some lecture notes online, the above equation is used to prove the virial theorem. For rectangular coordinates, the relation $$ 2T~=~\sum_i ...
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0answers
300 views

Classical scattering of two particles by a Yukawa potential [closed]

A point-like particle $A$, coming from minus spatial infinity, heads at another one, $B$, with an impact parameter of $b$. Initial momenta are $p_A$ and $p_B=0$. They repel each other via a Yukawa ...
4
votes
1answer
622 views

Finding the acceleration of a cart rolling on a table

The cart is rolls frictionless on the table. It has a mass of $1 kg$. Attached to it are 2 strings, that go through two frictionless sheaves. The weights have masses as in the picture. ...
0
votes
1answer
380 views

How is the equation of motion for a real scalar field derived from the Lagrangian?

The Lagrangian for a real scalar field is: $$\mathcal{L}=\frac{1}{2}\eta^{\mu \nu}\partial_{\mu}\phi\partial_{\nu}\phi-\frac{1}{2}m^2\phi^2 $$ How can I derive the dynamics of this field from this ...
3
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2answers
833 views

A partial differential equation for kinetic energy

The kinetic energy of a point particle of mass $m$ and speed $v$ is $K = \frac{1}{2}mv^2$. An elementary mathematics textbook I saw asked one to show that $$ \frac{\partial K}{\partial ...
2
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1answer
183 views

Why is $dL = L d\epsilon$?

Let's say there's a random elastic material. It's length is $L$ and it's tensile strain $\epsilon= (L-L_0)/L_0$ Now, when one pulls on it the following is true: $dW_{tot}=FdL =\sigma AdL=\sigma A L ...
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3answers
637 views

Must the Lagrangian always be known for the Euler-Lagrange equations to be of any use?

When studying classical mechanics using the Euler-Lagrange equations for the first time, my initial impression was that the Lagrangian was something that needed to be determined through integration of ...
1
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1answer
144 views

Measure density with the help of buoyancy

I am trying to derive a formula to calculate the density of a irregulary shaped object. I can measure the (false) weight of the object in pure air (of known density), and the (false) weight of the ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

Drag on a spinning ball in fluid

I am a physics newbie (high school level) and I am wondering what happens when a spherical object is spinning on the spot in a bunch of gas (no gravity here, just an imaginary physics sandbox). Am I ...
2
votes
1answer
260 views

Atomic physics through classical resonance?

I have a rather general question regarding the theory of Quantum Mechanics. To preface this question, consider a violin string. When a violinist exposes the string to a bow, this is exposing the ...
1
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2answers
140 views

What fraction of peak horsepower do typical 4 door passenger vehicles use?

I was surprised when I looked at the power rating of the engine used on a Humvee. It's only ~190 horsepower, which is exceeded by many sedan engines. So an obvious question is why doesn't my Camry SE ...
1
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1answer
155 views

Lego Blender and gear ratios

I bought the Lego Kit LEGO Crazy Contraptions. It allows the learner to build a blender. My son, the engineer, said something to our grandson, his son, about a gear ratio. Can someone translate?
2
votes
4answers
734 views

Bat hitting a ball

When a bat hits a ball, consider two cases: 1) The batsman goes for a defense, and stonewalls it, to reduce its speed. 2) the batsman goes for a shot, e.g. a home-run, etc. in which case will the ...
1
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3answers
280 views

Is a quantum system mandatory for generating true random sequence?

Is a quantum system necessary if we want to generate true random sequence? The mathematical framework used for classical mechanics doesn't involve any random value. But the mathematical framework of ...
2
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4answers
877 views

Pseudo force in rotating frames

A bug of mass $m$ crawls out along a radial scratch of a phonographic disc rotating at $\omega$ angular velocity. It travels with constant velocity $v$ with respect to the disc. What are the forces ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Should I use Coulombs law when magnets attract/repel?

When magnets attract to each other or repel. Should I use Coulombs law? If not, why not? Some would say that I shouldn't because: "Coulomb's law deals with static charges and force due to them. ...
8
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2answers
485 views

Liouville's theorem and gravitationally deflected lightpaths

It is customary in gravitational lensing problems, to project both the background source and the deflecting mass (e.g. a background quasar, and a foreground galaxy acting as a lens) in a plane. Then, ...
9
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3answers
721 views

When does $\hbar \rightarrow 0$ provide a valid transition from quantum to classcial mechanics? When and why does it fail?

Lets look at the transition amplitude $U(x_{b},x_{a})$ for a free particle between two points $x_{a}$ and $x_{b}$ in the Feynman path integral formulation $U(x_{b},x_{a}) = \int_{x_{a}}^{x_{b}} ...
4
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3answers
516 views

Are quantum mechanics and determinism actually irreconcilable? [closed]

As a preface, I am not a physicist. I'm simply interested in abstract physics and fundamental principles of the universe and such. As such, if you can provide an answer for the layman (as ...
2
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2answers
909 views

distance of electron from proton

An electron is projected, with an initial speed of $1.10 \times 10^5 \text{m/s}$, directly towards a proton that is essentially at rest. If the electron is initially a great distance from the ...
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1answer
464 views

Work done to tighten a screw [closed]

We use a wrench to turn nuts on bolts because they require less force. Consider a hexagonal nut 1 cm in diameter. We can tighten this nut with one of two wrenches, wrench A with lever arm 10 cm and ...