Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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Symmetries of separable potential

For separable potential, say $x^4+y^4$, its symmetry are degenerate. Is that a generic case to every separable potential? I will explain my question: The potential $x^4+y^4$ has $A_1, B_1, A_2, B_2, ...
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418 views

Angular velocity $\omega$ by $v$

We have two girls, with mass ($M$). They become close to each other in speed of $V$. The distance between them is $3L$. I was asked to calculate the Angular velocity ($\omega$) of the two girls. So ...
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393 views

Exam review question on thermodynamics [closed]

A cube has a side length of $20\text{ cm}$. An atom in the gas moves around the cube as shown. It continually bounces off the four lateral walls of the cube. The atom has a mass of $6.6\times ...
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1answer
218 views

Static plane in an inertial frame of reference

Suppose we are given a mechanical frame consisting of two points. How can we prove that assuming any initial conditions there is an inertial frame of reference in which these points will be in a ...
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1answer
304 views

Is there symmetry in 2d stress tensor in linear elastic fracture mechanics?

Assumptions: Cross terms in strain tensor are defined as equal $\varepsilon_{xy} = \varepsilon_{yx}$. pure mode I crack. Far from crack tip, material is purely elastic and we are way below yield ...
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560 views

How do I show that there exists variational/action principle for a given classical system?

We see variational principles coming into play in different places such as Classical Mechanics (Hamilton's principle which gives rise to the Euler-Lagrange equations), Optics (in the form of Fermat's ...
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2answers
6k views

Calculation of the maximum load to the bar

Looking for a way of calculating the maximum weight (W) to the rod with the given length (L) where the rod did not break and that only bend for (b) mm. Need only approximative solution (read: ...
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3answers
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Is there a valid Lagrangian formulation for all classical systems?

Can one use the Lagrangian formalism for all classical systems, i.e. systems with a set of trajectories $\vec{x}_i(t)$ describing paths? On the wikipedia page of Lagrangian mechanics, there is an ...
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284 views

Why do control moment gyroscopes exhibit “torque amplification”?

There are a number of articles that describe the benefits of using control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) over reaction wheels in inertial navigation applications. One of the primary benefits of using a CMG ...
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3answers
577 views

About constructing potential energy functions

There are many classical systems with different potential functions. My problem is that I do not understand how one can construct a certain potential function for a certain system. Are there any ...
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2answers
690 views

What is the inertial frame that explains the Foucault Pendulum?

I know that the Foucault pendulum rotation in relation to Earth is a proof that the object is inertial in relation to the distant stars. But what makes them more important than the Earth? Are they an ...
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59 views

Am I talking about the correct units here? [closed]

Paolo made a move I knew from dozens of townie soccer games played under lights on the fenced-in macadam pitch next to the elementary school in Badalucco, packed tight between Via Cristoforo Colombo ...
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Rope wrapped around a cylinder

If a rope is wrapped aound a cylinder what is the relationship between the amount of wrap and the ability to resist slipping off of the cylinder? An example would be if I had a 180 degree wrap and ...
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1answer
502 views

Origins of the principle of least time in classical mechanics

Is it possible to derive the principle of least time from the principle of least action in lagrangian or hamiltonian mechanics? Or is Fermat's principle more fundamental than the principle of least ...
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1answer
746 views

How does Newton's 2nd law correspond to GR in the weak field limit?

I can only perform the demonstration from the much simpler $E = mc^2$. Take as given the Einstein field equation: $G_{\mu\nu} = 8 \pi \, T_{\mu\nu}$ ... can it be proved that Newton's formulation ...
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4answers
548 views

how to represent the effect of linking rigid-bodies together?

I have 2 rigid-bodies (b1,b2) if i linked one to the other (as if they are conjoined together) , how to represent b1 effect on b2 and b2 effect on b1 Is there any LAW that affect the ...
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2answers
534 views

The Double Integrator: Matching velocity and position as quickly as possible with only a limited amount of force available

If a body with mass $m$ begins at position $x_0$ with velocity $v_0$ and experiences a force that varies as a function of time $f(t)$ (and we ignore gravity, friction, and everything else that might ...
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1answer
658 views

Problem based on Rotational Motion [closed]

A spool of mass $\mathsf m$ and inner radius $\mathsf r$ and outer radius $\mathsf{2r}$, having moment of inertia $\Large\mathsf{\frac{mr^2}{2}}$ is made to roll without sliding on a rough ...
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50 views

Does mass affects accelleration of an object in a sloapy movement? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Would a light or a heavy ball roll fastest down a slope? Is there a change of the accelleration of an object moving on a sloapy plane if the mass is changed?
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2answers
164 views

How fast will the projectile go the second time?

Say I have a linear motor [aka rail-gun] and use a x amount of electrical power. I fire the gun and the object exits at velocity v. I then reuse the same object as my projectile and fire the ...
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1answer
225 views

Do all closed systems, only considering kinematic/mechanical principles, exhibit time reversal symmetry?

It makes a lot of sense to me to imagine a cannonball flying through space as not so much experiencing a macroscopic non-conservative drag force, but as pushing a bunch of air molecules and giving ...
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2answers
315 views

Why doesn't phase space contain acceleration/forces?

I'm watching some Physics lectures on the internet by Leonard Susskind: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pyX8kQ-JzHI&feature=BFa&list=PL189C0DCE90CB6D81&lf=plpp_video In this lecture, and ...
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1answer
209 views

Distance a curveball travels?

I've seen some discussions regarding the movement of a spinning object, say a curveball. However, all have been largely qualitative. I was wondering if anyone has seen or worked through a ...
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1answer
220 views

Violation of conservation of energy and potential energy between objects

I would like to clarify my question. I have numbered them to be independent questions For any conservative fields, $\vec{F} = -\nabla U$. Which means the restoring force is opposite to the ...
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2answers
3k views

Rolling resistance and static friction

I am a bit confused about the relation between rolling resistance and static friction. I have often heard that it is the static friction that lets the wheel roll. Consider the following two cases: ...
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1answer
235 views

Tolerance of Natural Frequency & Resonance?

I'm writing a report at the moment about natural frequency, driving frequency and resonance - and I was wondering, is there a typical % tolerance inside which the driving frequency will cause ...
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1answer
594 views

Gears and efficiency/speed

For Christmas me and my brother got an AR Drone, the propellers are on a large gear, which is rotated by a small gear that is connected to the motor. This means the small gear (and therefore the ...
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2answers
631 views

Does the potential energy of fluid rising on a string change?

Lets say I have a glass of water at rest. Then I go and hang a string above the water (vertically), such as the end of the string is immersed in the water. Over time some of the water is going to ...
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1answer
1k views

Is it possible to break bulletproof glass with your voice?

In The Adventures of Tintin, an opera singer (the Milanese Nightingale) broke a bulletproof glass case using her voice. Is that scientifically possible? From the Wikipedia page, a typical bulletproof ...
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1answer
754 views

Conjugate Variables and Fourier Transforms in Classical Physics

Let q be a generalized coordinate with a conjugate momentum p and a potential resulting in a periodic motion of q. What is the meaning of the Fourier transform of q(t) over its period? Can this be ...
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1answer
209 views

Determine the tensor of contraint and deformation of a cube under compression

We have a cube under compression with dimension l1*l2*l3, is put between 2 rigid plates in the axis 1 (two plates block the deformation of the cube in thí axis), the cube is also put on a rigid plate, ...
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2answers
468 views

Question Based On Galileo's Law Of Falling Bodies

Galileo discovered that the distance fallen is proportional to the square of the time it has been falling.Why is it proportional to the square of the time and not just time? i.e $d \propto t^2$ why ...
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2answers
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How much effect does the mass of a bicycle tire have on acceleration?

There are claims often made that, eg, "An ounce of weight at the rims is like adding 7 ounces of frame weight." This is "common knowledge", but a few of us are skeptical, and our crude attempts at ...
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2answers
461 views

Spin angular momentum of a system of particles : Is there any energy associated with it?

Consider a system of point particles , where the mass of particle $i$ is $μ_i$ and its position vector is $\vec{r}_i$. Let $\vec{r}_\text{cm}$ is the position vector of the center of mass of the ...
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1answer
1k views

Converting angular velocity to linear velocity through friction

A very basic question here; it's related to this one, but not quite the same. If a rotating rigid body (a sphere for the sake of discussion) with mass $m$, radius $r$ and inertial tensor $I$ has ...
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1answer
949 views

What are examples of classical physical systems having polynomial observables of degree greater than 2?

Specifically: What are empirically well-understood examples of (integrable) Hamiltonian systems whose Hamiltonians include polynomial expressions, in the canonical coordinates $\{q^i,p_i\mid ...
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1answer
559 views

Thermal energy generated due to loss in kinetic energy when observed from two different frames of reference

A body is moving with a velocity $v$ with respect to a frame of reference $S_1$. It bumps into a very heavy object and comes to rest instantaneously, its kinetic energy $$\frac{1}{2}mv^2$$ as ...
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2answers
2k views

What are the expressions for rotational and translational kinetic energies of a system of point particles?

Consider a system of point particles , where the mass of particle $i$ is $\mu_i$ and its position vector is $r_i$. What are the expressions for translational kinetic energy and rotational kinetic ...
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5answers
582 views

Are Uncertainties in Measurements Important?

In the first lecture of MIT's Classical Mechanics Prof. Lewin highlights the importance of uncertainties in measurements by quoting "Any measurements, without the knowledge of uncertainty is ...
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3answers
99 views

I think there is something wrong with this problem. How do you know if the vertical acceleration is zero?

Suppose a block with mass 3kg is on a frictionless table and a force of 15N pulls it from an angle of 38 degrees above the horizontal. 1) What is the apparent weight of the block? 2) What is the ...
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2answers
175 views

Can we describe the classical laws of physics in a frame-of-reference-independent way?

First of all, I am not a physicist, so I cannot guarantee things I say will make sense. I will try my best, though. In classical mechanics we have the notion of inertial frame of reference. If my ...
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votes
4answers
3k views

Define Pressure at A point. Why is it a Scalar?

I have a final exam tomorrow for fluid mechanics and I was just looking over the practice exam questions. They do not provide solutions. But pretty much I have to define pressure at a point and also ...
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2answers
2k views

How does the speed of an incoming pitch affect the speed of a baseball after it's hit?

Which will go further if a batter manages to hit it with a baseball bat: a baseball thrown to the batter at 90 miles per hour or one thrown at 60 miles per hour?
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8answers
3k views

Real world examples for projectile thrown upwards or downwards

I am preparing a physics course for high school about projectile motions. If a projectile moves with initial velocity $v_0$ in the gravitational field of the earth, the equation $$ s(t) = 1/2 g t^2 ...
26
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5answers
4k views

What symmetry causes the Runge-Lenz vector to be conserved?

Noether's theorem relates symmetries to conserved quantities. For a central potential $V \propto \frac{1}{r}$, the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector is conserved. What is the symmetry associated with the ...
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1answer
443 views

Some questions about the logics of the principles of independence of motion and composition of motion

In high-school level textbooks* one encounters often the principles of independence of motion and that of composition (or superpositions) of motions. In this context this is used as "independence of ...
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3answers
555 views

Calculating stress without strain

I am working on an algorithm for a real-time simulation. I would like to calculate to extremely permissive tolerances approximate values for the stress within a 2D geometry. It will not be difficult ...
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2answers
332 views

Why do balls in a spinning ellipsoid move to the minor axis plane?

There is a question concerning the Physics of a small child's tall that has been bothering me for some time now. I have investigated this to a small degree, but I have not been able to find a ...
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1answer
224 views

Is the number of independent constants of a system equal to the number of degree of freedom of it?

Maybe the question is not very clear myself since I am not a physics major.But can you help me make this question clearer and then give me some comments on it? I got that this holds in gravitional ...
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2answers
2k views

why is mechanical waves faster in denser medium while EM waves slower?

Why is it that mechanical waves/longitudinal waves/sound travel faster in a denser/stiffer medium as in steel compared to say air, while EM waves/trasverse waves/light travels slower in a (optically) ...