Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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Tree level QFT and classical fields/particles

It is well known that scattering cross-sections computed at tree level correspond to cross-sections in the classical theory. For example the tree level cross-section for electron-electron scaterring ...
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What happens to temperature when pressure is constant in a cylindrical piston of saturated liquid ammonia?

Let's say I have a cylindrical piston containing saturated liquid ammonia that is fitted with an electrical heater and a paddle wheel for stirring at an initial pressure and an initial temperature. ...
2
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1answer
314 views

How should a closed-ended terrestrial trajectory be corrected for the Coriolis effect?

I have tried verifying the numerical integration of the Coriolis effect for 1000 to 2000-yard rifle fire by switching ON/OFF the Coriolis correction of a good ballistic simulator program (PRODAS). The ...
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Book against a wall and forces

If you take a book with mass of 1kg and push it against the wall. With how much force do you have to push the book so it does not fall? The problem is I know how to calculate this problem, you say ...
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1answer
347 views

Proof of the Hydrostatic weighing equation?

I've been trying to derive this equation for about two hours: But I can't seem to get it. In my class, we are using it to accurately measure the volume of irregulary-shaped objects, but I ...
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How fast does force propagate through matter? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it possible for information to be transmitted faster than light? Consider the following thought experiment. You have a long perfectly rigid beam (for the sake of ...
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1answer
10k views

Finding induced current in a loop at an instant [closed]

I'm working on this problem; however, I cannot seem to get anywhere. Given information: The rectangular loop in the figure has 2.1x10^-2 ohm resistance. What is the induced current in the loop at ...
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1answer
929 views

Problems that Lagranges equations of the 1st kind can solve whereas the 2nd kind can't?

Can anyone give examples of mechanics problems which can be solved by Lagrange equations of the first kind, but not the second kind?
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1answer
141 views

A ball inside a cavity

Seems not a trivial problem: There is a semi-cylindrical cavity, with radius $R$ as shown in the Figure. A small ball (point mass for simplicity) with an initial horizontal velocity $v$ flies into ...
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2answers
1k views

Canonical momentum in different coordinate system

The canonical momentum is defined as $p_{i} = \frac {\partial L}{\partial \dot{q_{i}}} $, where $L$ is the Lagrangian. So actually how does $p_{i}$ transform in one coordinate system $\textbf{q}$ to ...
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1answer
378 views

centrifugal force in static frame of reference

The other day we derived Kepler's third law. $$ \left( \frac{T_1}{T_2} \right)^2 = \left( \frac{r_1}{r_2} \right) ^3 $$ In order to derive this, you can look at a given planet that revolves around ...
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0answers
327 views

Error caused by pulley eccentricity [closed]

Not sure if this is perfectly a physics question: A rope is wrapped around a cylinder of diameter D. The cylinder is slightly eccentric so that the distance between the axis of the cylinder and the ...
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3answers
472 views

Is there a measure of internal energy flow?

A system might have internal energy and/or kinetic energy. Kinetic energy in classical mechanics is a form of energy the object has, only because of its relative movement to other objects. If you ...
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0answers
686 views

Bungee jump physics

Question: A bungee jumper jumps from a bridge. The length of the loose rope is 30 m. When the jumper reach the lowest point possible, the rope stretches 10 m. What is the final stretch of the rope, ...
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0answers
86 views

How can I model a polyatomic molecule as a system of coupled oscillators?

(Classical Mechanics) Let's say I have a polyatomic molecule, what is the best way for finding the equations of oscillations if they are bounded by a torsion spring?
2
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1answer
274 views

Additional accelerating force during take off of a rocket?

During the take off of a rocket, the exhaust produces some pressure below the rocket, which gives an additional force. How large is this force in comparison to the force produced directly by the ...
3
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0answers
288 views

Does a thermally expanding torus experience internal stress?

I'm trying to learn continuum mechanics and thermo-mechanics. As we know, heating an object increases the mean atomic distance $a_0$ of the atoms in a rigid body. Let's assume it is a linear elastic ...
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2answers
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Is instantaneous velocity an abstraction?

In introductory analysis, the discussion the derivative emphasizes that while average rates of change are measurable, instantaneous rates of change are a "limiting abstraction". While this makes ...
3
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1answer
346 views

What is force times angle?

I'm looking at an explanation of pendulums, and the following is said: What I don't understand is where it says "if restoring force is given by $mg\theta$..." - conceptually, what is a force times ...
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5answers
36k views

Yield Strength versus Ultimate Strength

What is the qualitative difference between these two: As seen on the table Typical yield and ultimate strengths. I am trying to resolve the meaning of the phrase "contact yield stress" from C. ...
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1answer
2k views

Force on rope with accelerating mass on pulley

I have a pretty basic pulley problem where I lack the right start. A child sits on a seat which is held by a rope going to a cable roll (attached to a tree) and back into the kid's hands. When it ...
4
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4answers
383 views

Applications of recoil principle in classical physics

Are there any interesting, important or (for the non physicist) astonishing examples where the recoil principle (as special case of conservation of linear momentum) is applied beside rockets and guns? ...
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2answers
923 views

How can you test to see if a dice is weighted?

I was browsing Etsy today and came across this. What tests are there to see if the dice are usable, ie, if one side isn't favored over another, and if all sides are balanced? Would this just be to ...
2
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2answers
176 views

Movement of a nudged block on a high friction surface

If I apply a single force to an object ‘floating in free space’, then it will either translate (if the force is in line with the Cof G ) or more generally it‘ll rotate about the C of G due to the ...
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2answers
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Classical car collision

I have a very confusing discussion with a friend of mine. 2 cars ($car_a$ and $car_b$) of the same mass $m$ are on a collision course. Both cars travel at $50_\frac{km}{h}$ towards each other. They ...
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2answers
249 views

Impulse situation

I am wondering if a physical system subjected to an impulse $=A\delta(x-a)$ makes any sense. I reckon that a force could take that form -- thought of as a finite impulse applied over an infinitesimal ...
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1answer
248 views

1D Wave mechanics (string)

Suppose I have a wave traveling to the right described by $e^{iw(t-{x\over c})}$. (It obeys the 1D wave equation). AND at $x=0$, there is a mass $M$ fixed to the string such that we have $M{d^2y\over ...
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1answer
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The gravitational potential of ellipsoid

In the literature (Kirchhoff G. - Mechanic (1897), Lecture 18 or Lamb, H. - Hydrodynamics (1879)) one can find the following analytical closed form expression for the gravitational potential of ...
3
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2answers
543 views

What is the mathematical formulation for buckling?

Argument: Buckling is an engineering concept that can only be applied to thin columns with compressive loading. (Is it possible to) Prove the above sentence right or wrong with mathematical ...
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0answers
164 views

Conveyor scales modeling

Assume we have a conveyor scales. Which consists of scales, and motor with conveyor belt placed above, so that the boxes can be measured (weight) while moving above. What I want is to create the model ...
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4answers
7k views

Torque vs Moment

I was wondering, why in Newtonian physics torque is called "torque" while in static mechanics they call it "moment"? I prefer by far the term "torque", for not only it sounds strong, but also ...
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1answer
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Why are infinitesimal rotations commutative, whereas finite rotations are not?

Infinitesimal rotations commute and every finite rotation is the composition of infinitesimal rotations which should logically mean they also commute; but they don't. Why?
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3answers
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Force as gradient of scalar potential energy

My text book reads If a particle is acted upon by the forces which are conservative; that is, if the forces are derivable from a scalar potential energy function in manner $ F=-\nabla V $. I ...
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0answers
280 views

Flattening rate of a parabola

If you have a piece of paper that is furled and unfurled so that it's in the shape of part of a parabola, and knowing that if you leave it, it'll flatten itself after time, would it flatten faster if ...
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1answer
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Is the static gauge pressure of a free jet always atmospheric?

Let's say I have a free jet of air leaving a pipe into the atmosphere. I know that the static gauge pressure at the pipe exit is equal to the atmospheric. But what about the static gauge pressure 10 ...
3
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1answer
207 views

What does this infinitesimal Eulerian change describe?

This is a question I originally posted in math.se which received an answer that was far too mathematically sophisticated for what I wanted; given that basic multivariable calculus was used through out ...
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1answer
271 views

Is the pressure at the outer hole on a pitot static tube equal to atmospheric pressure?

I'm looking at a pitot static tube question right now and I just need some clarification. There is the outer hole on the pitot static tube, not the hole that the air stream goes through, but the other ...
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0answers
156 views

How do I determine where the maximum air velocity around an object is?

I have a freestream of air directed at an object. Is there a way to find where the maximum air velcoty occurs with only having initial air speed and static pressure at the object?
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4answers
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Why does a ping pong ball change direction when I spin it on a table?

When I spin a ping pong ball on the table, it rolls forward in the opposite direction of the spin, and then eventually changes direction and rolls backward. Here's a video demonstrating the effect. ...
10
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1answer
467 views

D-brane Lagrangian?

As I understand it from the threads I read, D-branes are viewed as somewhat secondary to strings: If I know what all the open strings do, then I know what the D-branes do as well. But if the D-brane ...
2
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1answer
997 views

Question Concerning Dimensional Analysis

In the first lecture of MIT's Classical Mechanics Professor Lewin talks about Dimensional Analysis.He talks about an apple being dropped from a certain height can be quantitatively expressed as the ...
4
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1answer
260 views

Is there a Newton's third law for the em field?

There is a momentum associated with the em field that ensures the conservation of total momentum for a system of interacting charges. Can the same be done in an analagous way to ensure Newton's ...
4
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1answer
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What phrases describe collisions with coefficients of restitution less than zero or greater than one?

The coefficient of restitution describes the elasticity of a collision: 1 = perfectly elastic, kinetic energy is conserved 0 = perfectly inelastic, the objects move at the same speed post impact ...
0
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1answer
77 views

How must you spin the ball to make it alternate between 2 positions? [closed]

Assume any parameters you may need. Thanks in advance.
6
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2answers
17k views

Difference between momentum and kinetic energy

From a mathematical point of view it seems to be clear what's the difference between momentum and $mv$ and kinetic energy $\frac{1}{2} m v^2$. Now my problem is the following: Suppose you want to ...
9
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0answers
467 views

Classical mechanics: Generating function of lagrangian submanifold

I have a short question regarding the geometrical interpretation of the Hamilton-Jacobi-equation. One has the geometric version of $H \circ dS = E$ as an lagrangian submanifold $L=im(dS)$, which is ...
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7answers
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Why the Principle of Least Action?

I'll be generous and say it might be reasonable to assume that nature would tend to minimize, or maybe even maximize, the integral over time of $T-V$. Okay, fine. You write down the action ...
3
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2answers
477 views

Kinetic energy puzzle

System S1 moves at constant speed V with respect to S0 in one dimension: ...
0
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4answers
469 views

Whats wrong with this perpetual machine?

Consider a cube of mass M resting on a rough surface such that the coefficient of friction between the cube and the surface is K. So in order to just slide the cube I need to apply a minimum force of ...
3
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2answers
846 views

Relativistic effects

When are relativistic effects justifiably negligible? (I know that that is true for 'small velocities', but how small is 'small enough'?) 0.1c, 0.01c, etc.? And how does one properly justify that? I ...