Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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Sum of velocity fields

In hydrodynamics the for a non-viscous flow the velocity (and density) fields are given by the continuity and Euler equations: $$\rho\frac{\partial \vec{v}}{\partial ...
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62 views

Derivation of ensemble distribution

I heard that you can derive the canonical ensemble by maximizing $L = \sum_i p_ilog( p_i ) + \alpha (\sum_i p_iE_i-E)$ or for the grand-canonical ensemble $L = \sum_i p_ilog( p_i ) + \alpha ...
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119 views

What is difference between anisotropy and inhomogeinity of this type of composite material?

I am studying some types of composite materials having 2 phases - fibers and matrix. I have some questions and confusions. Any help is appreciated. The composite has fiber along length and I am ...
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120 views

Rotational Mechanics: Conservation of Angular Momentum

Consider a case where a person stands on top of a rotating disk. The disc is given to rotate at a constant rate. There are two possible movements of the man: He moves away from the center: In this ...
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123 views

De Donder Weyl theory

Im trying to get my head around what the difference is between a symplectic and multisymplectic manifold is. My understanding currently is that on a symplectic manifold time is the parameter that ...
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117 views

Why do we add the spin angular velocity and orbital anglar velocity when asked to calculate total angular velocity of Gyroscope?

Normally when we talk of angular velocity we mean how the angle of a vector changes with time with respect to an origin.Thus the oribital angular velocity of gyroscope makes sense to me.However I find ...
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283 views

Confusion in Euler-Bernoulli beam theory

Euler-Bernoulli beam equation is given by $$ EI \frac{\mathrm d^2 u}{\mathrm d x^2} = M'(x) \\ EI \frac{\mathrm d u}{\mathrm d x} = xM'(x) + C_1 $$ Where, $E$ is modulus, $I$ is second moment of ...
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167 views

Can the angular momentum of any rigid body (symmetrical or asymmetrical) be found this way?

Can the angular momentum of anybody regardless of whether its symmetrical about the center of mass or not be found by finding the angular momentum about its center of mass and summing it up with the ...
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346 views

Power dissipation in High Voltage Cables

I was doing the following physics problem in physics class: You have two dimensionally identical pieces of metal, one made from aluminium the other made from iron. It is given to us that ...
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799 views

Steering a motorcycle

From my experience riding, at low speeds (between 0 and 10 mph) you mostly steer the bike with the handlebars. What I mean by this is if you want to turn left you rotate the handlebars ...
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267 views

Conservative force as a potencial energy gradient

A conservative force $\vec{F}$ is apparently defined as the gradient of a potential energy $U$: $$\vec{F} = -\nabla\ U$$ I am curious if this definition was originally used to describe a ...
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141 views

How to reconcile these two approximations?

I'm working on what should be a simple problem (Taylor Classical Mechanics problem 6.23.), but I'm having a tough time reconciling the many ways it can be tackled. An aircraft whose speed is $v_0$ ...
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125 views

Integrals of Motion for s Degrees of Freedom

From Landau & Lifshitz, Classical Mechanics, the number of integrals of independent integrals of motion for a system of $s$ degrees of freedom is $2s-1$. I am considering a spherical pendulum in ...
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2k views

Difference between Hamiltonian in classical Mechanics and in quantum Mechanics

I have a question about difference between Hamiltonian function (the description of system in classical physics) and the Hamiltonian operator (quantum mechanics). I think that there two different ...
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381 views

Water bottle moment of inertia

I've noticed that I can make a full water bottle spin about its short axis easier than I can make it spin when it is 1/4 or 1/2 full. Also, when it is spun and is not full, the geometric center of the ...
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187 views

Work done against a resistive force

My past year exam paper had a question about work done against the resistive force, where the answer key said it was resistive force * distance. As I understand it, work done is a measure of impact a ...
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469 views

Since everything with mass exerts a gravity force on everything else, why do objects float in outer space?

For example, if you were to go out into deep space, and just slow down and stop your rocket. Everything inside the rocket that's not strapped in, starts floating. Why is that if every object has mass ...
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677 views

How can I derive the Hamiltonian of simple harmonic oscillator from this Lagrangian?

I'm working through Leonard Susskind's Theoretical Minimum: Classical Mechanics and I can't seem to understand how the Hamiltonian of a simple harmonic oscillator is derived from the following ...
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424 views

Force applied to an inclined plane

Below is a picture of the problem. Any guidance would be helpful. This problem isn't actually from any assignment, per se. I'm hoping that, by understanding this, it'll help me to understand a ...
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95 views

Understanding action reaction in an example

When I move an object that object should move me as well. I tried standing on a skateboard to reduce friction, and holding a heavy barbell, move myself away from it (while still holding it) but I ...
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57 views

Indicate if objects after collision will stick

Is it possible to indicate if objects after collision will stick together knowing their properties(materials,hardness,etc)?
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109 views

Where does energy go when performing a useless effort?

I went to school one day, so I thought I was able to get this simple one.. but it looks like I'm not anymore. :( One lonely little spaceship is resting into space. It has a small fuel capacity that ...
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108 views

Planar motion in central forces

In a two body problem under central force, corresponding to a potential $V(r)$(assume one body is massive compared to the other so that its motion is negligible), conservation of angular momentum ...
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169 views

When is this integral zero?

I have a particle with total energy $E$ confined in a potential $$U(x) = -\frac{\cos^4x}{2} - m \cos x - f \sin x. $$ The constants $f$ and $m$ are both in the range (-2,2). The energy is such that ...
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95 views

Kinetic energy in Lagrangian formalism

In reading Goldstein's Classical Mechanics (2nd edition) I came across a confusing derivation. Goldstein (Eq. 1-71) derives the total kinetic energy of a system of (classical) particles as: $$ T = ...
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121 views

Lagrange's equations derivations

While deriving lagrange's equation, for an infinitesimal displacement $\vec{dr}$, we express it using taylor series in terms of general coordinates as $\frac{\vec{dr}}{dq} \delta q$. Where ...
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128 views

How can I derive this Hamiltonian?

I have a Lagrangian $L$, a momentum $p$ and a Hamiltonian $H$: $$L=\frac m 2(\dot z + A\omega\cos\omega t)^2 - \frac k 2 z^2$$ $$p=m\dot z + mA\omega\cos\omega t$$ $$H=p\dot z - L=\frac m 2 \dot ...
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103 views

In a 2-body problem, when is the moving path closed?

In a 2-body problem is it true that, in all situations, the moving path is closed? In which cases are the paths closed? Fixing the coordinate system or fixing one of the bodies gives us different ...
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89 views

Calculating forces efficiently in Lagrangian formalism

I will Illustrate the question using an example problem: We have a mass $m$ connected to a mass $m$ by a rod of length $l$, and also to a mass $4m$ by another rod of length $l$. The rods are ...
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94 views

Contra-rotating propellers torques

Please look at the following mechanism for contra-rotating propellers: YouTube video When a CCW torque acts on the upper gear and a same torque acts on the lower gear (both seen from above), the ...
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60 views

Classical static equilibrium in atomic physics

Consider a collection of $n+1$ mass weighted points in $\mathbb{R}^3$. Suppose we have one mass located at the point (0,0,0) with mass $m\in\mathbb{N}$ and further suppose we have $n$ masses arranged ...
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479 views

Center of mass of a cylinder from which liquid is flowing out

A cylindrical container is of mass M, radius R and height H. The cylinder is filled with a liquid of density D. The base of the cylinder has an outlet tap of radius r through which the liquid can flow ...
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110 views

State of constant motion

Why does an object remains in its state of constant motion if there are no forces acting on that object? My understanding is that all the energy of the motion will be kept inside and a change in the ...
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217 views

Are Negative Eigen Values of a Hessian Matrix physically acceptable?

Suppose I have a Hessian Matrix of a System with 3N degrees of freedom, What are the physical significance of eigen values of the Hessian, Are negative Eigen Values physically acceptable?
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168 views

Eulerian Angles — Why three rotations can transform fixed frame into body frame?

"In general, if we restrict ourselves to rotations about one of the Cartesian axes, three successive rotations are required to transform the fixed frame into the body frame" The origin of our fixed ...
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138 views

How do I properly write Newton's second law for a particle with drag?

A heavy particle is projected at speed $U$ at an angle $\alpha$ to the horizontal. The particle is subject to air resistance which is experimentally found to vary proportionally to the square of ...
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521 views

Strain energy density in index notation

The strain energy density is defined as $$dU = \int_0^{\epsilon_{ij}} \sigma_{ij} d \epsilon_{ij}$$ (see Reddy "Energy Principles and Variational Methods in Applied Mechanics", 2nd Ed, 4.11). Assuming ...
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878 views

Modeling a 2-dimensional mass spring system

First of all, I am unfortunately not an expert in physics, so please be indulge with me. I am trying to model a $2$-dimensional mass-spring system with $1$ mass and $3$ springs to solve a dynamics ...
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264 views

Moment of inertia of a system in different cases

A rod of mass $m$ and length $l$ is pivoted at one end to ceiling and free to rotate in the vertical plane. A disc of radius $R$, which is less than $l$, can be fixed at its other end in 2 ways : ...
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191 views

Conceptual question on superposition of forces holding a specific mass in equilibrium

Consider a point mass $x$ (like for example the earth in space) and let $A$ and $B$ be two sets of point masses which each hold the point mass $x$ in equilibrium, meaning the acceleration induced by ...
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89 views

The superposition of force (or acceleration) configurations

My question is quite specific as it refers to this article but I hope that someone here could help me. I cite the relevant part of the article: ... The second example consists of gravitational ...
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185 views

What is the neatest way to describe a “non-autonomous” (lagrangian) system?

The configuration space of a system of particles $(m_i,x_i)$, $i=1,\dots,n$, subject to constraints $$\Phi (x)=0,\qquad \Phi\colon \mathbb R^{3n}\to \mathbb R ^{3n-k},\qquad x=(x_1,...,x_n),$$ if the ...
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Classical Mechanics & Coordinates [closed]

What is the meaning generalised coordinates in Classical Mechanics? How is Lagrangian formalism different from Hamiltonian formalism? How are they related to Hamilton's Principle? How are they ...
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159 views

Classical Mechanics - Allowed systems

I've edited my question to clear any possible confusing parts: This an exercise from the book "The Theoretical minimum", I'm paraphrasing. In classical mechanics, dynamical laws must be reversible ...
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Why does a particle fall in a straight line?

In Lagrangian Mechanics we choose the path of least action. Given a uniform gravitational field, and a particle of finite mass; and fixing two points the start & end-point we consider all paths ...
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323 views

Does Newton's first law state something substantive, or is it merely describing a convention?

Newton's first law is often said to define what an inertial frame is - namely, a reference frame in which a body not acted on by a force will move with constant velocity. In other words, a frame where ...
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109 views

Classical mechanical problem

I have two planes, one characterized by equation $$\phi_1=f(x)-z=0$$ and another $$\phi_2=\alpha y-z=0$$ where $\alpha$ is arbitrary. In their line of intersection(we assume it exist and is continous) ...
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420 views

Why does moment equilibrium at one point of an object mean the moment is at equilibrium for the whole system?

In class my prof said that when showing a system is at equilibrium it suffices to show that the moment at one point is zero. Why? Why does showing the moment at a point is zero imply the moment of the ...
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Solve a problem of work and energy

A man pulling sled of his daughter by a massless rope, climbing a snowy hill whose slope is equal to 15 °. Considering that the mass of the sled is $4Kg$, the girl's $26Kg$ and $\mu _c = 0,25$, ...
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Landau Lifshitz energy for uniform rotation

Landau Lifshitz claim in their Mechanics book (39.11) that for a uniform rotation we have $ E = \frac{mv^2}{2} - \frac{m}{2} (\omega \times r)^2 + U,$ where the rotation is given by $v' = v + \omega ...