Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms

12
votes
4answers
1k views

How to sail downwind faster than the wind?

Recently a group set a record for sailing a wind-powered land vehicle directly down wind, and a speed faster than wind speed. Wikipedia has a page talking about it, but it doesn't explain exactly how ...
11
votes
3answers
904 views

Imagine a long bar floating in space. What force does it exert on itself in the middle due to gravity?

Problem If you had a long bar floating in space, what would be the compressive force at the centre of the bar, due to the self-weight of both ends? Diagram - what is the force at point X in the ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What is the direction of the friction force on a rolling ball?

Suppose you have a solid ball on a horizontal table. What is the direction of friction force when the ball I pushed horizontally and starts rolling? Why is the direction of friction as it is? Which ...
57
votes
9answers
5k views

Is Angular Momentum truly fundamental?

This may seem like a slightly trite question, but it is one that has long intrigued me. Since I formally learned classical (Newtonian) mechanics, it has often struck me that angular momentum (and ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Constraint force on a rod

I really hope someone will take a quick look at the following, I would just love to better understand it... This exercise is from Arnold's "Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics", p. 97 in the ...
4
votes
2answers
795 views

Question about moment of inertia and velocity

First off, I swear this is not homework. I'm doing some practice problems because I got an exam coming up. I'm stuck on this one: I figured I would use energy conservation for this problem. So since ...
24
votes
12answers
3k views

Will a ball slide down a lumpy hill over the same path it rolls down the hill?

Suppose I have a lumpy hill. In a first experiment, the hill is frictionless and I let a ball slide down, starting from rest. I watch the path it takes (the time-independent trail it follows). ...
2
votes
3answers
160 views

What condition is fulfilled by the path of a mass sliding down a lumpy hill?

Suppose I have a hill that goes up and down unevenly. It's frictionless, and I want to slide a point mass down the hill. I am interested in the path it takes. (By "path" I mean the trail it leaves ...
4
votes
4answers
670 views

Are the physical laws scale-dependent?

If you read the article "More Is Different", by P.W. Anderson (Science, 4 August 1972), you will find a deep question: are the physical laws dependent of the size of the system under study? As an ...
4
votes
3answers
388 views

How do molecules vibrate after collision?

The difference between kinematics and dynamics that Grisha pointed to in his answer comes up in a similar but slightly more complicated case: Consider (in 1D) two point-like particles connected by a ...
28
votes
16answers
3k views

Why does one experience a short pull in the wrong direction when a vehicle stops?

When you're in a train and it slows down, you experience the push forward from the deceleration which is no surprise since the force one experiences results from good old $F=m a$. However, the moment ...
1
vote
3answers
350 views

Where do atoms go after collision?

[I edited the question according to Mark's and Grisha's answers.] Consider two point-like particles of equal mass colliding centrally in 2D. The final directions of the momenta of the two particles ...
5
votes
1answer
701 views

Equilibrium and movement of a cylinder with asymmetric mass centre on an inclined plane

A cylinder whose cross section is represented below is placed on an inclined plane. I would like to determine the maximum slope of the inclined plane so that the cylinder does not roll. The mass ...
3
votes
1answer
560 views

Does the friction force change directions with a change in reference frame?

In a basic friction problem with Block A sliding on top of Block B, the direction of the friction force is usually explained as being simply the opposite of the direction of motion. So if Block A is ...
6
votes
6answers
1k views

Simple three-body-problem?

Consider the problem of three bodies two of which having mass M, one of them having mass m. Body m is in the middle between the other two, coupled to them by two equal linear springs in rest. Now fix ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

4th equation of motion

Ive been given the 4 equations of motions The fourth being: $$s=ut+\frac{1}{2}at^2$$ If rearranged it forms the quadratic equation $$at^2+2ut-2s=0$$ But that means that t has 2 values. Will ...
1
vote
5answers
563 views

Why do we automatically assume that the velocity vector $\vec{v}$ and location vector $\vec{r}$ are independent?

I'm not sure if it's relevant, but I'm talking about a situation where a particle is moving in an electro-magnetic field. As I understand, if we see the term $\nabla \cdot \vec{v}$ or $\nabla \times ...
-1
votes
2answers
5k views

Period of Precession [closed]

I'm trying to find the period of precession for a gyroscope. Now I was able to find the angular precession rate, which was 1.132 rad/s, but I have no idea how to convert this to a 'period', and google ...
0
votes
2answers
316 views

Angular Momentum and Force [closed]

I'm stuck on number 5. The answers to the first 4 are correct, but I dont know how to set up number 5. Any idea that I would have would require me having some kind of time information, but thats not ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Angular Momentum and Average Torque

Refer to number 6. This is the one I'm stuck on. So angular momentum is conserved right, so initial angular momentum is equal to final angular momentum. Initial is 7.87 so final must be 7.87, right? ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

What determines the (minimum) angle at which a domino falls over?

Dominoes, when placed upright, remain that way. Sometimes, even if you tip them a little bit, they will go back to their upright position. However, if you tip them too far, they will fall over. ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Finding angular acceleration from torque

We have to analyze this video Givens: An applied net torque due to the wind on the windmill is equal to 1500 N*m. Each (of the 3) propeller props weighs approximately 45 Kg and has a Moment of ...
14
votes
9answers
2k views

What are good mechanics experiments for 10 year olds? [closed]

I'm trying to explain elementary mechanics - without the benefits of calculus or even algebra - and struggling. I'd like to find reasonable ways to demonstrate Newton's laws, minimally, and possibly ...
11
votes
9answers
4k views

Book about classical mechanics

I am looking for a book about "advanced" classical mechanics. By advanced I mean a book considering directly Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation, and also providing a firm basis in the geometrical ...