Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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Good books for understanding Lagrangian formulation of classical fields?

I want to understand Lagrangian formulation for classical fields and apply it to understand constrained dynamics. Currently I am referring to "A modern approach: Classical Mechanics" by ECG Sudarshan, ...
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Energy-Momentum tensor for classical field with nontrivial boundary conditions

Question: Is there a energy-momentum tensor for the potential flow equations with a free surface under the action of gravity (ie the equations governing some types of surface water waves)? ...
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Coordinates from action-angle variables

I'm interested into getting the original coordinates, $q(t)$ and $p(t)$, from the action, $J=\oint p dq$, and angle, $w(t)=\frac{dH}{dJ}t+\beta$, variables for a 1-D, one particle system. I know that ...
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Are these torques correct for a simple balancing/fulcrum experiment?

For my physics lab, they had us do a simple static equilibrium experiment where we rested a ruler on a fulcrum (at its center of mass) and then attached varying amounts of weight on either end at ...
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Are there any conditions under which the Christoffel symbols can be treated as a damping term in a harmonic oscillator?

(Mathjax did not seem to be working as I composed this question. Hopefully it will kick into action once I post.) Note I am a novice at tensor notation. I am working with the following Lagrangian (...
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Moving a Car the quickest path

I have a car, that has a current angle and location, and a destination angle and location. The car has a maximum linear and angular acceleration. Assume the car will always travel in the direction it ...
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74 views

Clarification on conservation of energy for (or internal potential energy of) $N$ particle system

In Goldstein's Classical Mechanics, it says: Consider now the right-hand side of Eq. (1.29). In the special case that the external forces are derivable in terms of the gradient of a potential, the ...
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23 views

Ski treadmill materials

This ski treadmill is not much of an incline, but it still allows people to ski and carve out turns. What materials have such a low coefficient of friction, yet allow higher friction at higher ...
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20 views

Relation between solvent accessibility and brownian motion

Assume one has a molecule (made of nodes) inside a solvent. If one tries to model the average effect of the interaction between the molecule and the solvent, one has two effects: 1- Friction term on ...
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When the equations of motion are not unique (eg. when they are given by eigenvectors), which will the free particle adhere to?

For this question I think it will be easier to express the usual equation describing the motion of a "free particle,"--viz. $g_{ij}\dot{x}^i\dot{x}^j$--in matrix form as follows: $$g_{ij}\dot{x}^i\...
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Maximum possible acceleration value on a ball in volleyball game

I have been examining this subject on web but could found enough information yet. I have to make a decision on choosing "range" for accelerometer which will measure acceleration value of ball in ...
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24 views

should transverse and longitudinal phonon velocities be equal for this mass spring system?

Let's say we have a cubic lattice of identical masses $m$, each connected to its 6 nearest neighbors by identical spring constants $k$. Essentially, the problem is I get an eigenvalue problem with ...
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The force of a spring

I am new in continuum mechanics and I want to prove the formula which gives the force given by a spring : $$F_{max}= \frac{Ed^4(L-nd)}{16(1+\nu)(D-d)^3 n}$$ where : $E$ – Young's modulus $d$ – ...
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55 views

Is time-1 map of a Hamiltonian vector field on a cylinder always twist?

I have a one degree of freedom analytic Hamiltonian $H(q,p)$ defined on a semi-infinite cylinder, i.e. $(q,p) \in \mathbb{T} \times \mathbb{R}^{+}$, such that all level sets $H(q,p)=c$ are closed ...
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A mysterious conserved quantity for a central potential

In teaching a course in classical mechanics and I have come across (from my predecessor) a to me mysterious conserved quantity. We are considering a gravitational (or electric) potential with the ...
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142 views

Friction in Lagrangian formulation

We know the Lagrange equations are: $$\frac{\partial \mathcal{L}}{\partial q_i}-\frac{d}{dt}\left(\frac{\partial \mathcal{L}}{\partial \dot{q_i}}\right)=0.$$ Then, when we add friction in there, we ...
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77 views

Proof of Lagrangian

I'm having some trouble with some math on a problem for a physics class (looking for help with some partial derivatives, not an answer). Let $$L'=L+\dfrac{dF}{dt},$$ where $L$ is a Lagrangian and $F$ ...
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Canonical Momentum Conjugate vs. Momentum

I stumbled upon this while reading about Legendre Transforms today. So consider an n-particle system. The Lagrangian is a function of $ q_i$'s and $\dot q_i$'s. If you consider the manifold $M$ where ...
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Potential Energy of two masses

If two particles with masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ interact and are located at $\vec{s_1}$ and $\vec{s_2}$ have their potential energy $U$ defined by the modulus of their position vectors, how would I ...
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Preservation of phase space volume: the extension from “small” times to generic times

Having a classical system whose evolution is described by \begin{equation} \dot{\phi_t}(x) = f(\phi_t (x))\\ \phi_0 (x) = x \end{equation} denoting with $\phi_t (x)$ the evolution for a time t of the ...
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59 views

Solving for position of a SO(3) rotating object, given the integrable functions for components of angular velocity along the principle axes

Assuming that you have approximated or solved the Euler's Equations for components of angular velocity along its principal axes of inertia $x$, $y$ and $z$ - i.e. in the coordinate system that is ...
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classical extrema to Lagrangian field equation

Local extrema to the classical Lagrangian field equation are minima and are termed instantons. In classical field theory we do not distinguish between global and local extrema of the action. Can we ...
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68 views

Average energy of a damped-forced harmonic oscillator during a period t

In my textbook, it's stated without proving the following identity for a classical damped-forced harmonic oscillator: $$ \bar{E}^t = \bar{T}^t + \bar{V}^t = 2 \bar{T}^t \, , $$ which states that ...
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71 views

Finding the configuration space and degrees of freedom of spherical pendulum

Suppose we have a spherical pendulum tethered to the origin in $\mathbb{R}^3$ where the length of the rod is a time varying function $l(t)$. What is the configuration space of this system, and how ...
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Making Pudding; A complicated non-equilibrium statistical process?

There are a lot of non-equilibrium processes examples given in physics literature. But some processes that are present in everyday life are not treated. As an example, the formation of pudding can be ...
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Bertrand's Theorem: Perturbative Methods Leading to $1/r^3$ Solution

My professor and I have been working on a proof of Bertrand's Theorem using perturbative methods. We have arrived at a solution yielding 1/r^3, which we had presumed to be an incorrect result. While I'...
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Effective length factor of a polymer in solution

If one wants to calculate the force needed to buckle a polymer in solution with Euler buckling, what would the effective length factor be? The polymer is free to move and rotate in solution as it sees ...
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56 views

Normal coordinates for harmonic approximation (classical lattice vibration)

I am reading Jenő Sólyom's "Fundamentals of the Physcs of Solids" vol. 1. and i am very much stuck at this point (chapter 11.3.2 in the book): In the harmonic approximation the potential energy of a ...
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89 views

Fluid mechanics -Question about boundary?

Problem statement: A two-dimensional fluid stream of thickness $S$ and velocity $c$ (evenly distributed through the thickness of the stream) falls on a stationary plate and gets separated. Calculate ...
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46 views

Does the force of releasing the latch of a spring-latch contraption affects the force generated by the spring?

There is this contraption in my class, where a rod is attached to a latch and a spring. By pulling the latch back behind a piece of metal, the latch is secured, the rod if pulled back and the spring ...
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156 views

When to use Hamiltonian vs Lagrangian?

I currently studying the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms in classical mechanics, but something I'm not seeing is how do I know which one to use in a given problem? After I find the Lagrangian, ...
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55 views

Thermal de Broglie wave length

If we refer to this wiki page thermal de Broglie wave length, we can see there are two expressions. One is derived using equipartition theorem, which makes perfect sense. The other one used $\pi kT$ ...
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Does the additivity property of Integrals of motion and Lagrangians valid in all situations?

I would like to know if the additivity property of an integral (constant) of motion valid in all situations ? It works for energy but does it work for all other integrals of motion in all kinds of ...
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Motion in a vertical circle and forces in polar coordinates

Suppose a particle with mass $m$ is whirled at instantaneous speed $v$ on the end of a string of length $R$ in a vertical circle. Let $\theta$ be the angle the string makes with the horizontal. I know ...
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60 views

Is there a typology of different fundamental physical objects?

As I understand it (and of course, I may be wrong!).... In classical mechanics, all objects are basically the same in the sense that They are composed of atoms bunched together. These atoms occupy ...
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Non-dimensionalizing the “bead on a rotating hoop, with viscous damping” problem

This is not a homework question. Rather, this is an exercise I have taken up on myself. In particular, I am trying to find an algorithmic way to non-dimensionalize known equations, using the ...
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71 views

Rheological behavior of chocolate

If someone eats chocolate, the chocolate goes through the following configurations: $\chi_0:$ chocolate is solid and has a smooth Surface everywhere; the Riemann Tensor vanishes on every Point of the ...
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When will be a suspended (not at the center of the mass) symmetric rotating gyroscope in stable or instable position?

The original question is what is in the title. I'm not sure about the answer so here is my solution, please correct me If I am wrong: It is known for a gyroscope what is in a homogenous gravity field ...
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152 views

Equilibrium Points in Lagrangian Mechanics

Suppose we have a one particle system with generalized coordinates $q_i$. In classical mechanics, the corresponding Lagrangian is $L = T - V$. Assume $V(q)$ is time-independent. What additional ...
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Pivotal door - how is the load distributed?

A pivotal door, where instead of the door hung or cantilevered from the hinges screwed to the frame, the door is hung using a top and bottom pivot. The bottom pivot assembly's the floor-spring is ...
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Interpretation of partition function and thermodynamic potential

So in the microcanonical ensemble the partition function $\Omega$ counts the number of microstates for a given $(NVE)$ configuaration and $S = k_B \ln (\Omega)$ is the entropy. The most likely state ...
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Trying to model the acceleration of a system due to an impulse forcing function

My team and I are working on a design project to design/modify a device that can go on hikes for paraplegic/quadriplegic people. Here is the current design (not designed by us): We are thinking ...
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155 views

The classical hydrogen atom

Suppose we want to analyze a hydrogen atom using purely classical mechanics. This obviously is not exactly how things work - quantum mechanics plays a huge role and probability distributions are ...
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61 views

Modeling the creation of transverse waves

Suppose I hang one end of a jump rope against a wall and start waving the other end. I'm interested in knowing the behavior of the jump rope as it starts generating waves. In other words, how can I ...
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60 views

Example of materials with 21 independant coefficients in linear elasticity?

By definition of linear elasticity, the strain et stress tensors are related: \begin{equation} \boldsymbol{\sigma}=\mathbf{C}:\boldsymbol{\varepsilon} \end{equation} and because of minor and major ...
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Explanation of fringe pattern of thin film interference

Recently i went through calculations for finding the path difference between the first 2 reflected rays for a oil film with air on other 2 sides .But i could not understand how the fringes will be ...
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Functional relationship of pressure and position(1d)

so today I started doing my research on oscillations in a course on advanced mechanics. The experiment was to mathematically model the speed of sound in air and experimentally prove the usability of ...
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Showing the Hamiltonian of the $\alpha$ FPU is real

I am studying the $\alpha$ FPU chain which is a model of coupled oscillators with small non-linearity. For these systems, I derived the following Hamiltonian $H$ which is given by $$ H=\sum_{j=1}^{N} \...
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35 views

What forces are involved to enable a rock to skip in water?

Does the surface tension matter or is it something else that is providing the upward force? Can someone explain the phenomenon to me physically?
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122 views

Why is commutation relations the first step in quantization?

Why is commutation relations the first step in quantization?