Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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How much force is required to compress air?

How much force (Newtons) is required to compress normal air in a chamber to 2 atm? For example, if I had a sealed piston pump, how much force would need to be exerted in order for the air to be ...
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1answer
50 views

Why are non-horizontal levers not considered to be in equilibrium?

Consider a triple-beam balance, like so: An unknown mass is placed on the left pan, and the provided weights are moved on the right until the lever arm comes to rest at an exactly horizontal ...
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1answer
42 views

Are Negative Eigen Values of a Hessian Matrix physically acceptable?

Suppose I have a Hessian Matrix of a System with 3N degrees of freedom, What are the physical significance of eigen values of the Hessian, Are negative Eigen Values physically acceptable?
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2answers
200 views

Formalism to deal with discontinuous potentials in classical mechanics (hard wall, hard spheres)

It seems to me that Hamiltonian formalism does not suit well for problems involving instantaneous change of momentum, like particle collisions with hard wall or hard sphere gas model. At least I could ...
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26 views

simple pendulum rotating in a horizontal plane [duplicate]

imagine you are rotating a simple pendulum above your head in a horizontal plane. is it possible to keep the pendulum in the horizontal plane. if yes, i want to know what is the force that keeps ...
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0answers
63 views

More on the closed-form for a simple pendulum

I've learnt about the simple pendulum, and while the regular curriculum only uses the linear approximation of $\sin\theta$ to obtain $\ddot\theta+\omega_0^{2}\theta=0$. I tried to find out about a ...
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2answers
46 views

Eulerian Angles — Why three rotations can transform fixed frame into body frame?

"In general, if we restrict ourselves to rotations about one of the Cartesian axes, three successive rotations are required to transform the fixed frame into the body frame" The origin of our fixed ...
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1answer
45 views

Name of unknown effect where liquid moves when placed on a jagged surface

I recently saw a video in which a water droplet, when dropped on a jagged surface (see photo), and whilst under the Leidenfrost Effect, moved. Does anyone know the name of this effect?
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2answers
34 views

horizontal motion inside a cone (cylindrical polars)

I have a question from an example we done in lecture Suppose we have a particle moving inside the surface of a cone given by $r = wz$ where $w$ is a constant, and also suppose initially the particle ...
2
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0answers
41 views

Matrix Representations of Galilean group

The general group element (in the vector representation) $$ \left [{ \begin{array} {c} \bar x^1 \\ \bar x^2 \\ \bar x^3 \\ \bar t \\ 1 \\ \end{array} } \right] = \left[ ...
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1answer
37 views

Heuristic equation for Friction force between materials

I'm programming a game where different types of objects will be sliding over different types of terrains (Top-down in two dimensions). At my current level of physics education we are given the ...
6
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1answer
234 views

Why is the Hodge dual so essential?

It seems unnatural to me that it is so often worthwhile to replace physical objects with their Hodge duals. For instance, if the magnetic field is properly thought of as a 2-form and the electric ...
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1answer
81 views

Lagrangian to Hamiltonian

I'm having some problems with an assignment where I have to state the Hamiltonian from the kinetic energy $T$ and potential energy $U$. These are as follows: ...
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2answers
123 views

Galilean, SE(3), Poincare groups - Central Extension

After having learnt that the Galilean (with its central extension) with an unitary operator $$ U = \sum_{i=1}^3\Big(\delta\theta_iL_i + \delta x_iP_i + \delta\lambda_iG_i +dtH\Big) + ...
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1answer
51 views

When does the angular momentum point in a different direction from the angular velocity?

I read this somewhere: $$\mathbf{L} = \tilde{\mathbf{I}}\mathbf{\omega}$$ In general, the angular momentum vector, $\mathbf{L}$, obtained from Equation above, points in a different direction to the ...
6
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2answers
168 views

Why $-i\hbar\vec\nabla$ for momentum in quantum mechanics, while $m\vec{v}$ in classical mechanics?

I am a little bit confused when thinking of the momentum representation in QM and CM. In QM, momentum is represented as $-i\hbar\vec\nabla$, while in classical, momentum is represented as $m\vec{v}$. ...
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2answers
56 views

Taking time derivative of two dependant variables

I'm not entirely sure if this is correct. I have to take the time derivative of the following: $$\frac{d}{dt}mr^{2}\dot{\phi}$$ Now, both $r$ and $\dot{\phi}$ depends on the time $t$, so I have to ...
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1answer
122 views

Are the Hamiltonian and Lagrangian always convex functions?

The Hamiltonian and Lagrangian are related by a Legendre transform: $$ H(\mathbf{q}, \mathbf{p}, t) = \sum_i \dot q_i p_i - \mathcal{L}(\mathbf{q}, \mathbf{\dot q}, t). $$ For this to be a Legendre ...
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1answer
31 views

Can someone explain the solution (provided) of this conical pendulum work problem [closed]

In the image, it looks like the tangential direction is always 45 degrees away from the string, not 90 degrees. Is it not the circular path that the solution is talking about?
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3answers
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Why does water gulp out of a water bottle with a narrow opening instead of a steady flow?

For example, take a water bottle. Fill it with water and then turn it upside down. Instead of flowing steadily downward, it gulps down in parts. Why?
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2answers
79 views

How do I properly write Newton's second law for a particle with drag?

A heavy particle is projected at speed $U$ at an angle $\alpha$ to the horizontal. The particle is subject to air resistance which is experimentally found to vary proportionally to the square of ...
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0answers
45 views

stopping, moving of mobile phone when vibrating

A mobile phone move aside when it vibrates. How is that happening ? and most importantly is it possible to make any changes to the vibration motor to stop moving when vibrating or any other methods to ...
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2answers
41 views

If a paper disc is cut into a spiral, does its moment of inertia change?

It is obvious that there is no change in the mass of it and its radius. But the shape of the object does change. Does it mean its moment of inertia will also change?
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Casimir Invariants of the Galilean group

I had studied a couple of things about Galilean and Poincare group. But in the Galilean group, there is not enough clarity on how to calculate generators for boosts ($B_i$), which if I do it seems I ...
2
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2answers
131 views

How can I tell that circular motion is a solution for a particle confined to the surface of a cone?

I'm working on a problem where a particle of mass $m$ is confined to the surface of an inverted half cone (and is circling downwards due to gravity), with the cone's half angle $\alpha$. I chose to ...
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5answers
68 views

Why is the independence of orthogonal vector-quantities always implicit in books/lectures?

The "theorem" that I can "just" separately deal with orthogonal quantities (like horizontal and vertical force or velocity, etc), I never found explicitly mentioned, but just implicitly in the ...
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0answers
19 views

model for flexible stick

I'm trying to model a flexible stick with a partial differential equation. I want one of the ends to be fixed and the other end to swing. Do you guys know of any good models I can use? Any ...
4
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1answer
58 views

Why is it easier to glide on sharp ice skates than on dull skates?

There have been previous questions (e.g. here and here) on Physics.SE about the mechanism that makes ice skating possible. Reviewing these, as well external references, it seems pretty clear that the ...
3
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1answer
57 views

Mathematically impossible for a vortex line to have loose ends?

Could someone show the math behind it? Source : "A vortex is a bunch of air circulating around itself. The axis around which the air is rotating is called a vortex line. It is mathematically ...
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0answers
33 views

Why does air circulate on an airfoil — The Kutta Condition

Why does the air circulate on a flowing airfoil, thus giving rise to increased velocity (circulation + relative airspeed) above the wing and hence decreased pressure.
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0answers
52 views

Why friction force is force of constraint?

My understanding about constraint force is that it is a force which limits the geometry of particle's motion. For example, situations such as the particle trapped in a track or limited in domain can ...
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0answers
18 views

Applied / environmental question: direction of exhaust fumes

I'm not sure the Physics StackExchange is the perfect place for this environmental/applied physics question, but as I found no forum more fitting I ask my question here. Otherwise please move my ...
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2answers
101 views

Shouldn't the Uncertainty Principle be intuitively obvious, at least when talking about the position and momentum of an object?

Please forgive me if I'm wrong, as I have no formal physics training (apart from some in high school and personal reading), but there's something about Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle that strikes ...
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2answers
62 views

How does isotropy of free space imply $L(v^2)$ for a free particle? [duplicate]

From Mechanics; Landau and Lifshitz, it's stated on page 5: Since space is isotropic, the Lagrangian must also be indpendent of the direction of $ \mathbf{v}$, and is therfore a function only of ...
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1answer
63 views

Spring Damper System for a Vibrating Motor

Good day people of SE I have a friend that has a final year project and is stuck. He has a motor with a small weight at the end of the shaft that causes vibrations. This motor is on a thin plate. ...
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0answers
50 views

2d pool collision with rotational motion

I'm trying to calculate two 2d disks' collision with rotational motion. The collision is perfectly elastic: the sum of translational and rotational energy is conserved. In the instant of the collision ...
2
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1answer
33 views

the speed of an unconstant motion

There's already the solution for the problem but I still don't understand why the velocity can't be calculated by just $$ a = (v(t))'= -B_0 + B_1t \Rightarrow v(t) = -B_0t + 1/2B_1t^2$$ Also, both ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Find Angular Momentum about any point

How do I find the angular momentum of a body about any point? We know that $L=I\omega$ for a body rotating in space, where $L$ denotes the angular momentum, $I$ denotes the moment of inertia and ...
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2answers
119 views

Find the minimum value of velocity [closed]

Find the minimum value of the initial velocity $u$ of the particle such that the particle crosses the wheel of radius $R$. Details and assumptions $R=2m$ $g=9.8m/s^2$ Neglect air resistance. All ...
2
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0answers
38 views

Reasons to consider the coefficient of restitution velocity independent - conditions when this does apply

In high-school mathematics textbooks a bouncing ball is often considered as an example of an exponential decay. One can easily derive this if one assumes that the coefficient of restitution is ...
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6answers
1k views

Are there forces which do not involve a change in momentum?

I am familiar with the equation $$\vec{F}=m \vec{a}$$ I am wondering as to whether it is possible for something to exert a force on another object without changing the momentum of said object. My ...
1
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2answers
121 views

Strain energy density in index notation

The strain energy density is defined as $$dU = \int_0^{\epsilon_{ij}} \sigma_{ij} d \epsilon_{ij}$$ (see Reddy "Energy Principles and Variational Methods in Applied Mechanics", 2nd Ed, 4.11). Assuming ...
5
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0answers
49 views

Time inversion for Euler equation

Consider Euler equation for continuum body: $$\frac{\partial u^i}{\partial t}+\mathbf u\cdot \nabla u^i=- \frac{1}{\rho} \frac{\partial p}{\partial x^i} $$ where $\rho$ is the mass density, $p$ is ...
2
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0answers
111 views

Does limit $\hbar \rightarrow 0$ in Quantum Mechanics mean anything?

Assuming that I learn Quantum Mechanics first, and then I approach Classical Mechanics as a special case of Quantum Mechanics, I will definitely find the relationship between Quantum Mechanics and ...
0
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3answers
84 views

In what situations do water levels not reach equilibrium?

I have been taught that water levels will always equal out. However, now I find that sumps and some other setups allow for water not to become equal. What other arrangements allow for the water levels ...
0
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1answer
68 views

Equation of a flying kite

My question is the following: What is the shape of the rope which holds a kite flying? (Steady state.) I am not a physicist (I am a mathematician), so I can not work the physics part of the ...
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68 views

Correct way to include constant external force in virial and pressure calculation

Halo, given a simulation cell with N particles where particles interact only with bond and pair potentials and periodic boundary conditions (minimum image convention) are used. On a subgroup of ...
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1answer
30 views

Two masses collide on a ramp [closed]

M1 slides down a frictionless ramp and collides with M2 They both compress the spring. How far is the spring compressed? What is the final velocity of M1 on the rebound up the ramp? I was thinking ...
1
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1answer
375 views

How to calculate the moment of inertia of a solid cube

How do I calculate the moment of inertia of a uniform solid cube about an axis passing through its center of mass? I also wanted to know if the moment of inertia ...
0
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2answers
42 views

Angle rotated by a rod when it's hit by a pendulum

Consider a pendulum of length $h$ with a bob of mass $m$ it is held horizontally at and angle of $90^{\circ}$ with the vertical. A rod of mass $M$ and length $h$ is pivoted at its upper end and this ...