Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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7
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2answers
271 views

How should I throttle my rocket to reach highest altitude? [closed]

"Real world" problem. Suppose we want to launch a rocket equipped with an engine which can be throttled as we prefer. Suppose also that the amount of fuel burnt per time is directly proportional ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

Invariance of Temperature in Classical Physics

How can we explain that Temperature is a classically frame-independent quantity to high school kids?
1
vote
4answers
131 views

Basic buoyancy question

If I have a cup of water filled with air at the bottom of a pool, then when the cup is "upside down" the air doesn't leave because the water pressure is pushing it up against the top of the container. ...
0
votes
0answers
78 views

Block on an inclined plane [closed]

If you take moments about the centre of mass of a block positioned on an inclined plane so that the gravitational force can be drawn from the centre of mass of the block to one corner of the block, ...
4
votes
2answers
82 views

How much does the sound definition vary during an LP (Vinyl)?

This question came to me when I realized how the linear speed varies while listening to a Vinyl LP. The linear speed variation has to be compensated with a variation in the resolution of the grooves, ...
9
votes
3answers
641 views

Confusion regarding the principle of least action in Landau's “The Classical Theory of Fields”

Edit: The previous title didn't really ask the same thing as the question (sorry about that), so I've changed it. To clarify, I understand that the action isn't always a minimum. My questions are in ...
3
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0answers
46 views

Why and how almost periodic series constitute the algebra of observable of integrable systems?

In the introduction of his book Noncommutative Geometry, p. 42, Connes explains that when a classical dynamical system has enough constants of motions, the motion of the system is almost periodic, ...
1
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3answers
296 views

The boundary for quantum mechanical behavior and classical mechanical behavior

To what size and how does "quantum weirdness" such as entanglement and superposition stop applying to larger objects (mere unions of these quantum particles). How do these macro objects that behave as ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

(air pressure and displacement) Isn't this image wrong?

Isn't this figure wrong? P(x,t) = -B(dy/dx) . If the derivative of air displacement has a maximum, then this is where the pressure is minimum, not maximum as this figure suggests. Could someone ...
4
votes
3answers
731 views

Quantum Mechanics or Classical Mechanics? [closed]

I'm just a student of grade 11 but, I was interested in knowing about Physics much deeper. In order to start my interest in Physics, I watched this video of Quantum Physics NOVA : Quantum ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Sign of gravitational force

I'm reading Lanczos's The variational principles of mechanics, and on pp. 80-81 there is an example involving a system made up of $n$ rigid bars, freely jointed at their end points, and the two free ...
2
votes
3answers
443 views

Is escape velocity the same for all objects?

Would a lighter-than-air craft in the mid atmosphere at 80,000 feet altitude need to achieve the same velocity to escape earth gravity as the space shuttle?
2
votes
2answers
550 views

Standing wave velocity

My question is simple: How is it that a standing wave has velocity? I mean, it's not travelling... A lot of equations depend on this concept, for example: $f_n = \frac{nv}{2L}$ Here we're ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

Which areas of physics are related to the act of playing drums?

I'm musician (drummer) and I'm trying to figure out what can I study (related to Physics) for better understanding of the drumsticks and wrist movements, the force applied and the better way to apply ...
2
votes
1answer
158 views

Walking & Swinging

How can I show that the most convenient way to move the arms while walking is swinging them back and forth, alternatively? To pose the question in another way: can I prove, starting from the ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Can I use one convex lens to create a telescope?

Is it possible to create a telescope with only one convex lens? Specifically, is the image I drew below possible? (This was supposed to be rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise.) In this picture, ...
4
votes
1answer
128 views

Curvilinear Coordinates and basis vectors

In these notes, $\frac{\partial \vec{r}} {\partial q_i}$ is stated to form a basis set for the vector space. How does this happen? Also, how does one justify this equation from Goldstein's ...
1
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0answers
49 views

How to show $ \epsilon_{iab}\epsilon_{jcd}(x_ap_d\lbrace x_c,p_b \rbrace+x_cp_b\lbrace x_a,p_d \rbrace) = x_ip_j-x_jp_i$ [closed]

If $ \lbrace f,g \rbrace $ is Poisson bracket and $\epsilon_{ijk}$ is Levi-Civita symbol, how to show that $$ \epsilon_{iab}\epsilon_{jcd}(x_ap_d\lbrace x_c,p_b \rbrace+x_cp_b\lbrace x_a,p_d ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

Lagrange's equations derivations

While deriving lagrange's equation, for an infinitesimal displacement $\vec{dr}$, we express it using taylor series in terms of general coordinates as $\frac{\vec{dr}}{dq} \delta q$. Where ...
1
vote
2answers
121 views

How can I derive this Hamiltonian?

I have a Lagrangian $L$, a momentum $p$ and a Hamiltonian $H$: $$L=\frac m 2(\dot z + A\omega\cos\omega t)^2 - \frac k 2 z^2$$ $$p=m\dot z + mA\omega\cos\omega t$$ $$H=p\dot z - L=\frac m 2 \dot ...
8
votes
2answers
476 views

What do the derivatives in these Hamilton equations mean?

I have a Hamiltonian: $$H=\dot qp - L = \frac 1 2 m\dot q^2+kq^2\frac 1 2 - aq$$ In a system with one coordinate $q$ (where $L$ is the Lagrangian). One of the Hamilton equations is: $$\dot q ...
1
vote
2answers
265 views

Constraint and Applied forces

In D'Alembert principle forces are classified into constraint and applied forces ? Is this classification different from internal-external forces ?
4
votes
3answers
346 views

Informal book on Classical Mechanics [duplicate]

I just want a book on classical mechanics that covers the same ground as Goldstein's book but is more on the line of DJ Griffiths's Classical Electrodynamics. I mean less formal and more ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

How is the velocity not constant?

A bead is moving along the spoke of a wheel at constant speed u , the wheel rotates with uniform angular velocity w radians per second about an axis fixed in space , at t=0 the bead is in the x ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

In a 2-body problem, when is the moving path closed?

In a 2-body problem is it true that, in all situations, the moving path is closed? In which cases are the paths closed? Fixing the coordinate system or fixing one of the bodies gives us different ...
2
votes
1answer
142 views

Physics books covering classic mechanics [duplicate]

I am going to be a high school freshman next year and I have acquired a strong interest in physics. I have a mathematical background, upto, but not including, Calculus. I am looking for in depth ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

rotation of earth and changes in its diameter

could calculated the changes of the Earth's diameter cause the rotation?? I have seen 2 other posts about it but I couldn't understand their calculation and they were a little confusing and couldn't ...
4
votes
2answers
214 views

Variation of Action with time coordinate variations

I was trying to derive equation (65) in the following review: http://relativity.livingreviews.org/open?pubNo=lrr-2004-4&page=articlesu23.html This slightly unusual then usual classical mechanics ...
1
vote
1answer
409 views

How can I find the motion equations of the 2-dim harmonic oscillator?

First of all: I am no physicist, so I am rather helpless. I need to find the moving equations of the 2-dim. harmonic oscillator. If it is possible it should be rather elementary, because, as I said, ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

Tension on an object [closed]

According to a website, $T_3 = T_2 + T_1$. Also, the rope and pulley device are mass less. But I don't really understand this. Let me try and explain how I see the problem. $M_2$ receives tension ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Lifting an Atwoods machine from the ground? [closed]

If we have an Atwood machine where masses $m_A$ and $m_B$ rest on the ground, then we apply an upwards force $F$ to the Atwoods machine. What is the acceleration of the blocks when $F=124N$, $m_A = ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Calculating forces efficiently in Lagrangian formalism

I will Illustrate the question using an example problem: We have a mass $m$ connected to a mass $m$ by a rod of length $l$, and also to a mass $4m$ by another rod of length $l$. The rods are ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Contra-rotating propellers torques

Please look at the following mechanism for contra-rotating propellers: YouTube video When a CCW torque acts on the upper gear and a same torque acts on the lower gear (both seen from above), the ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Does mass equal angular momentum?

At the wikipedia pages for angular momentum ($L$) and moment of inertia ($I$) we find the equations: $$L=I \omega$$ $$I=m r^2$$ where $m$ is mass and $r$ is the distance between said mass and ...
4
votes
2answers
363 views

Euler Lagrange equation in different frames

Suppose I have an inertial frame with coordinate $\{q\}$. Now I define another reference frame with coordinate $\{q'(q,\dot q,t)\}$. I obtain the equation of motion in $\{q'\}$ in two different ways: ...
2
votes
5answers
105 views

How to transfer mechanical power from the inside of a vacuum chamber to the outside while maintaining a seal?

In a vacuum chamber how would one transfer mechanical power (either rotation or linear) from inside to the external environment? I'm working on an idea for a new/different type of motor that would ...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

Rocket towing an object

I'm not sure if my question makes sense, but I don't know where to start. A crate of mass $m_2$ is connected by a massless rope of constant length $l$ to a rocket of mass $m_1$. We take into account ...
5
votes
2answers
556 views

Is it really impossible to calculate in advance the result of throwing dice?

Is it really impossible to calculate in advance the result of throwing dice? After all, the physics of dice throwing is in the world of classical mechanics, rather than quantum mechanics.
2
votes
1answer
100 views

buckling of tube - shell thickness vs. momentum of inertia optimum

is there any simple formula (perhabs semi emperical, or aproximatively derived model) for buckling of tube under axial compression load given its crossection and wall thickness? ( and naturraly ...
1
vote
0answers
107 views

Partial derivative of the classical action with respect to time [closed]

Does anyone know how to derive the general identity: $$\frac{\partial S}{\partial t}=-E$$ where $S$ is the classical action defined as $$S=\int_0^t\left[\frac{1}{2}m\dot x-V(x))\right]d\tau$$ and ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Lagrangian for a system of particles [closed]

If a system of particles attracting each other under inverse square force, then prove that $$ 2<T> + <V> = 0.$$
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Optimal placement of support joist under shelf

Assume an ideal board, supported by two joists. Where should those two joists be optimally placed? Instinctively, I'd say at somewhat less than 25% and somewhat more than 75% of the extend of the ...
2
votes
2answers
131 views

Why fundamentally does classical mechanics lead to second order dynamics? [duplicate]

What's so special about second order equations in classical mechanics? I have a basic understanding of the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of classical mechanics, so I'm not looking for ...
2
votes
2answers
239 views

Rotation of object on another object under rotation

First, I would like to know the rotational velocity of disk2 if disk1 turns at $\omega1$. The axis "x" is fixed to the ground and disk1 is allowed to turn around it. Axis "y" is fixed to disk1 and ...
2
votes
0answers
115 views

Difference of the O(N) Non-linear Sigma model and SO(N) Non-linearSigma model

The Hamiltonian \begin{equation} H=J\sum_{i,j}\vec{n}_i\cdot\vec{n}_j \end{equation} is invariant under a global rotation $\vec{n}_i\rightarrow R\vec{n}_i$, where $\vec{n}$ is a $N$ component rotor ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

Cause for Power Transmission Tower “Breathing”

OK, this question is not your usual one: Last night while hiking solo from the mountains back to my car at the mountain/desert interface (Lone Pine, CA), I had a rather bizarre -- and downright spooky ...
8
votes
4answers
970 views

How can things be chaotic on a quantum level, yet tangible on a classical level?

This may seem basic, but I am wondering if anyone has any input on this topic. It doesn't make any sense to me (I mean I don't need to use the Schrödinger equation to find my cell phone...). I just do ...
6
votes
3answers
568 views

Is there an inconsistency between Quantum and Classic in probability density of harmonic oscillator ground state?

Consider probability densities for a particle in the lowest energy state of a simple harmonic oscillator. The quantum mechanical probability density peaks near the equilibrium point and extends beyond ...
6
votes
2answers
121 views

What makes laminar cascade break?

Near my house there is a mall that have a cascade, which has a pratically constant flow, and doesn't seem to have perturbations (at least near the edge where water falls), between its two levels. ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Initial velocities of a collision [closed]

This is the question: A car of mass 900 kg and a van of mass 1300 kg collide at a crossroads. Investigation into the collision discloses that the car was travelling south east and that the van was ...