Classical mechanics refers to the classical (i.e., non-relativistic, non-quantum) study of physics. Three major formulations of classical mechanics are newtonian mechanics, lagrangian mechanics, and hamiltonian mechanics. The latter two are rather useful in extensions to Classical Mechanics; ...

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How do you find the tension in the real world? (Given a rope in a pulley system)

I'm well aware of the formula to calculate tension, however, given a real world situation where you have a closed pulley system. How do you measure the force (i.e., tension) required to pull on the ...
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0answers
26 views

Block slides down smooth hemisphere: WHEN will it leave surface? [on hold]

A block is at rest at the top of a frictionless hemisphere of radius r. It is slightly disturbed and starts sliding down. WHEN will it leave the surface of the hemisphere?
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31 views

Difficult Atwood's machine problem - Finding $L(t)$ [on hold]

The whole problem was: You have got a turnable disc of mass $m$ and radius $r$. The rope around the disc has mass $M$ and length $l$. At time $t=0$ the disc is not turning. The height difference ...
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2answers
44 views

Force needed to push a syringe plunger: does one add force associated with downstream back-pressure to frictional plunger force?

I am trying to figure out how much force $F$ is needed to push a syringe plunger. The plunger needs to overcome the friction force $F_1$ and (a much smaller) inertia force $F_2=ma$, giving the total ...
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1answer
44 views

Are there limits to human/devices perception?

As far as i know, measurement devices present measurements based on something that affects the device's particles, for instance, forces, heat, tension, voltage... My question is, given that every ...
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17 views

Time period of a mass around a long wire [on hold]

A particle of mass $m$ is circling an infinitely long wire in a circular motion with radius $r$. The wire's length density is $\rho$ (in meters per kg). Find the the period of one circulation. I am ...
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3answers
105 views

How do we know that the Fourier transform of space is momentum?

How do we know that the Fourier transform of real space $x$ is the momentum $p$ space or for energy and time, receptively? What's the mathematical process and physical logic?
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18 views

Projectile Motion with uneven ground [duplicate]

I am suppose to find the optimal angle $\theta$ for a stone to be thrown with the initial velocity $u$, from a tower, of height $h$ to obtain a maximum distance (Range) $R$. So I did the some ...
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1answer
39 views

spinning a water bottle quickly

When we spin a water bottle so quickly, why don't the water inside the bottle come out ? It has to do with the normal force and the apparent weight , i think . but plz someone explain for me how does ...
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0answers
28 views

Describing the motion of a point-mass [on hold]

Consider a point-mass moving around a fixed point on a circle with radius $r$ with constant angular velocity $\omega$. At a certain moment of time, the connection is removed, and the point-mass flies ...
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1answer
26 views

Simulating Phase Space Evolution

I am interested in modeling the time evolution of phase-space $\rho(\vec{q},\vec{p},t)$. I have attempted to use Liouville's theorem $\partial_t\rho=-\sum_{i=1}^{3}(\partial_{q_i}\rho)\dot ...
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0answers
25 views

Marvin the Martian vs. the Death Star: how much energy will they actually need to disintegrate the Earth? [duplicate]

Marvin the Martian vs. the Death Star: how much energy will they actually need to disintegrate the Earth? According to a detailed analysis by Dave Typinski, Marvin the Martian’s Illudium Q-36 ...
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27 views

How high can you stack mobile homes? [on hold]

In Ernest Cline's novel Ready Player One, the main character lives in the "stacks" - a dystopian vision of what a trailer park may look like in the future. The "stacks" are primarily composed of ...
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0answers
113 views

Marvin the Martian vs. the Death Star: how much energy will they actually need to disintegrate the Earth?

According to a detailed analysis by Dave Typinski, Marvin the Martian’s Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator will require $1.711 \cdot 10^{32}~\text{J}$ to shatter the Earth into a gravitationally ...
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2answers
34 views

What's the physical interpretation of an arbitrary normal mode for masses and springs?

Consider the following system consisting of 3 masses and 4 springs : I have learned that this system posseses three normal modes, corresponding to its three natural frequencies, say ...
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1answer
109 views

Why is the relationship between velocity and radius curved, in circular motion?

An experiment to model planetary motion: The brown rubber was supposed to model a planet, while we varied the radius $r$ and the mass hanging from the string. Varying the masses was to show ...
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5answers
794 views

Classical Mechanics contradicts Conservation of energy?

Imagine a Stanford torus rotating with 1 rpm so that centripetal/reactive centrifugal acceleration provides about 1.0g of artificial gravitational acceleration inside the ring. The picture below shows ...
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1answer
41 views

What am i doing wrong here(dynamics)?they should give the same answer [closed]

So a body $m$ is on a uniform circular motion ($\omega = d\theta/dt = \text{constant}$), it is suspended by an inextensible rope with negligeable mass: First picture so: $$ -mg + T \cos \alpha = ...
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1answer
71 views

Is there an error in Susskinds' derivation of Euler-Lagrange equations?

http://imgur.com/kZO5C0V First, I believe there is a trivial error. The second equation should have another $\Delta t$ multiplying everything on the right. It is divided out later when the equation ...
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0answers
25 views

Equilibrium Points in Lagrangian Mechanics

Suppose we have a one particle system with generalized coordinates $q_i$. In classical mechanics, the corresponding Lagrangian is $L = T - V$. Assume $V(q)$ is time-independent. What additional ...
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1answer
17 views

Period of swinging incomplete hula-hoop

I was working on a problem where I had to calculate the period of a swinging incomplete hula-hoop given its center of mass and radius. It only swings with very small amplitude so I considered the ...
2
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1answer
48 views

Does Special Relativity require a “ruler postulate” analogous to the “clock postulate”?

It's fairly well known that the clock postulate is needed in Special Relativity when dealing with accelerated clocks, so does something analogous exist when dealing with accelerated spatial ...
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1answer
49 views

Analytical Mechanics [closed]

This is one of my three homeworks. I see that $W_a(1) = \dot U_a(1)=\ddot{X_a}(1) = 0.3 $ Since $U_{O'}=0 $ then O' is Instant centre of rotation. Then $U_b = 2U_a = 0.6$ I tried a lot, about a ...
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0answers
32 views

Symplectic Structure without predefined Hamiltonian

Here there is a link which has helped me understanding the relationship between symplectic geometry and classical mechanincs. In short, the symplectic form transforms the derivative of the ...
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1answer
20 views

How to calculate when an object will fall over

TL;DR Given the point of centre of mass, width of base and height, is there a way to calculate the angle where the object will fall over? The TL;DR of this question pretty much sums it up, however I ...
2
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1answer
73 views

How can the Gallilean transformations form a group?

In class my professor said the Galilean transformations form a group of order 10. $$ x'=x-vt\\ y'=y\\ z'=z\\ t'=t\\ $$ But how do these form a group? I don't see 10 things to interpret as elements. I ...
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1answer
38 views

Torque and Car parked on slope [closed]

I have a homework question in which a car of mass $M\ kg$ is parked on a hill inclined at $25^o$ The car is facing up the hill and I am told that the wheels are $3\ m$ apart and the centre of mass is ...
1
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1answer
32 views

Sum of velocity fields

In hydrodynamics the for a non-viscous flow the velocity (and density) fields are given by the continuity and Euler equations: $$\rho\frac{\partial \vec{v}}{\partial ...
2
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1answer
65 views

Why do some objects tend to change their axis of rotation while rotating?

This question struck me a few minutes back, I was at a table with a pear. It was more narrow than round.I proceeded to rotate this pear in one swift movement. It rotated for a few seconds, and ...
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0answers
11 views

What is the temperature effect on trajectories in phase space in molecular dynamics?

In molecular dynamics simulations or microcanonical ensemble (fixed-energy), what is the effect of temperature on the trajectories of the reacting systems (let's say two reactants react to form two ...
5
votes
3answers
149 views

What forces are at work in a loose ball bearing bicycle hub?

I've landed in a physics debate amongst bike mechanics. In a typical bicycle hub you have a simple bearing; the cups are set in the hub, the race (cone) threads onto the axel and there are just loose ...
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Does screwdriver length matter?

Everyone who deals with screws and screwdrivers knows that long screwdrivers are stronger than short ones. However, I can't find any relationship between length of a screwdriver and mechanical ...
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2answers
46 views

Net work done for rubber bands

I know that work is done on a rubber band to extend it, and then the rubber band does work to contract. However, then what is the net work done? If it returns to its original length, is the area ...
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2answers
34 views

Derivation of ensemble distribution

I heard that you can derive the canonical ensemble by maximizing $L = \sum_i p_ilog( p_i ) + \alpha (\sum_i p_iE_i-E)$ or for the grand-canonical ensemble $L = \sum_i p_ilog( p_i ) + \alpha ...
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0answers
46 views

Good introduction to classical mechanics with math [duplicate]

Right now, I'm reading "Classical Mechanics" by Kibble and Berkshire. Already in chapter 2, I have found a concept being discussed that assumes you have prior knowledge. Specifically, it describes the ...
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2answers
24 views

Understanding a graph of energy conservation with bounded and unbounded motions?

This graph is from the physics undergraduate text "Classical Mechanics by Douglas Gregory". Above this graph was the statement: What I didn't understand is- as stated in the under [*paragraph], ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Energy in harmonic oscillator [closed]

The expectation value of the potential energy is exactly half the total according to Griffiths. Is that case always true for quantum harmonic oscillator? Is that the case also for classical harmonic ...
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0answers
18 views

Isolate an electronic drum from the ground

Please note that I know nothing about this part of physics, so sorry if I make some mistakes. Drum is an awesome instrument, yet it can easily make your neighbours very angry.The vibrations caused by ...
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1answer
16 views

What is difference between anisotropy and inhomogeinity of this type of composite material?

I am studying some types of composite materials having 2 phases - fibers and matrix. I have some questions and confusions. Any help is appreciated. The composite has fiber along length and I am ...
1
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1answer
94 views

Work-Energy theorem vs conservation of mechanical energy? [closed]

Bodies A and B are moving in the same direction in a straight line with constant velocities on a frictionless surface. the mass and the velocity of A are: 2kg and 10m/s. The mass and the velocity ...
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0answers
64 views

Theory books for physics upto Irodov level [duplicate]

Problems in Physics by IE Irodov is a very popular book amongst students for problem solving. It has very good problems. However, most of the popular high-school physics textbooks like Resnick ...
2
votes
2answers
94 views

Coupled ODEs that model a quad rotor

I am working on modeling the vibrations of a quad rotor. The arms that support the rotors are fixed to a center plate; that is, it is pretty much a cantilever beam with an end load. Since this is the ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian EOM with dissipative force

I am trying to write the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian for the forced Harmonic oscillator before quantizing it to get to the quantum picture. For EOM $$m\ddot{q}+\beta\dot{q}+kq=f(t),$$ I write the ...
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0answers
10 views

Pivotal door - how is the load distributed?

A pivotal door, where instead of the door hung or cantilevered from the hinges screwed to the frame, the door is hung using a top and bottom pivot. The bottom pivot assembly's the floor-spring is ...
1
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1answer
45 views

Rotational Mechanics: Conservation of Angular Momentum

Consider a case where a person stands on top of a rotating disk. The disc is given to rotate at a constant rate. There are two possible movements of the man: He moves away from the center: In this ...
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0answers
28 views

Kinetic energy of the spring

Suppose we have spring of mass $m$ initially at rest , now instantaneous velocity of $v$ is given at both ends in opposite direction (nothing is attached to spring) so what will be kinetic energy of ...
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1answer
44 views

Pressure in Harmonic Oscillation

Classical Harmonic oscillator's energy depends on temperature as it equals $k_B$$T/2$. However, quantum harmonic oscillator energy is $(n+1/2)hf$. So, when T=0, quantum predicts motion. I have been ...
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53 views

Interpretation of partition function and thermodynamic potential

So in the microcanonical ensemble the partition function $\Omega$ counts the number of microstates for a given $(NVE)$ configuaration and $S = k_B \ln (\Omega)$ is the entropy. The most likely state ...
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2answers
70 views

Problem in Euler-Lagrange imply Newton

I'm self-studying Mechanics and I have a little problem: We can see that in Landau's book or in Wikipedia that when we inject the lagrangian in Euler Lagrange equation the term $\frac{\partial ...
1
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1answer
44 views

Koopman Von Neumann state vs Quantum state

Is it correct to think that a state in Hilbert space represents the "most we can know" about a system? Is therefore a state in KvN Hilbert space the same as a state in the usual quantum Hilbert space, ...