5
votes
0answers
37 views

Spin-dependence of the directionality of dipole radiation

I am interested in understanding how and whether the transformation properties of a (classical or quantum) field under rotations or boosts relate in a simple way to the directional dependence of the ...
-3
votes
1answer
41 views

Can a classical (or quantum) field, particularly the EMF, have a frame of reference?

I understand that a massless particle (such as a photon) cannot have a frame of reference. But the electromagnetic field does have mass; does it have a frame of reference? If so, I have a second ...
6
votes
1answer
129 views

Question about the Noether charge algebra

I'm reading these notes - page 8 and 9 - and I'm a bit confused. If we consider a field $\phi$ (which can be either bosonic or fermionic) transforming as: \begin{equation} \phi(x) \rightarrow \phi(x) ...
4
votes
2answers
189 views

Hamilton formalism for Dirac spinors

Let's have the Dirac free lagrangian: $$ L = \bar {\Psi} (i\gamma^{\mu}\partial_{\mu} - m) \Psi . $$ I can rewrite it as $$ L = i\Psi^{\dagger}\partial_{0}\Psi - H_{d}, \quad H_{d} = ...
0
votes
0answers
68 views

Classical systems with strong coupling

I would like to have some examples of classical systems with "strong" coupling coefficient (in their action term). Specifically, I am looking for intermediate or cross-over ranges of coupling ...
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Why does the minimum energy field configuration require the fields to be constant?

I am having a hard time in understanding a well known statement always made in the context of field theory. Background Consider a classical real scalar field theory with Lagrangian density given by ...
2
votes
1answer
360 views

Noether First and Second Theorem

I have this question related to the the Noether's Theorems. I want to know a rigorous enough enunciation of this theorem, the context is Classical Field Theory without fancy geometrical structures ...
4
votes
1answer
244 views

Can classical systems exhibit “strong coupling”?

Does the concept of strong coupling mean anything in a classical setting? If strong coupling means just an inability to apply perturbative methods to the Hamiltonian, then obviously yes, we can ...
3
votes
0answers
136 views

Questions about classical and quantum scale invariance

This is kind of a continuation of this and this previous questions. Say one has a free "classical" field theory which is scale invariant and one develops a perturbative classical solution for an ...
6
votes
1answer
525 views

Frasca's mapping of classical Yang-Mills to $\phi^4$ theory

I recently came across an article on the arXiv 0709.2042 written by Marco Frasca, where he provides a mapping between classical Yang-Mills theory to $\phi^4$ theory. Has his idea been fruitful in ...