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25 views

Free Complex scalar field and conservation principle

In a free complex scalar field, the difference between the number of Particles and antiparticles is conserved. This constarint can be satisfied with a simultaneous creation of equal number of ...
3
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3answers
102 views

What is the point of complex fields in classical field theory?

I see a lot of books/lectures about classical field theory making use of complex scalar fields. However why complex fields are used in the first place is often not really motivated. Sometimes one can ...
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3answers
148 views

Symmetry at quantum level in quantum field theory

In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, a symmetry is a transformation on states in the Hilbert space which keeps the Hamiltonian invariant and this implies that the generator of the transformation must ...
0
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0answers
77 views

Book on Noether theorem and classical field theory

I couldn't follow the derivation of Noether theorem in my QFT book, and have some problems with classical field theory and functional derivatives etc. Is there a book which gives an introduction to ...
3
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1answer
78 views

Is $\phi^4$ theory in 4d conformally invariant at the classial level?

I used to believe the three following statements to be true (at the classical level only): From scale invariance full conformal invariance follows. Scale invariance is present if there are no ...
1
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1answer
68 views

Proof that Maxwell equations are Lorentz invariant

In Peskin and Schroeder page 37, it is written that Using vector and tensor fields, we can write a variety of Lorentz-invariant equations. Criteria for Lorentz invariance: In general, any equation ...
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3answers
54 views

Examples of non-linear field symmetries?

Consider a Lagrangian theory of fields $\phi^a(x)$. Sometime such a theory posseses a symmetry (let's talk about internal symmetries for simplicity), which means that the Lagrangian is invariant under ...
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1answer
52 views

Strong interaction under $SO(3)$ isospin transformation

I'm given the following strong interaction: $$S = \int d^{4}x [\frac{1}{2} \partial_{\mu} \phi^{a} \partial^{\mu} \phi^{a} - \frac{m^2}{2} \phi^{a} \phi^{a}] ,\qquad a = 1,2,3 \text{.}$$ It is stated ...
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1answer
106 views

Derivatives with upper and lower indices

I'm studying classical and quantum field theory, but evaluating derivatives of fields (scalar and/or vector) described with upper and lower indices is somewhat new to me. I'm trying to evaluate ...
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0answers
27 views

classical extrema to Lagrangian field equation

Local extrema to the classical Lagrangian field equation are minima and are termed instantons. In classical field theory we do not distinguish between global and local extrema of the action. Can we ...
7
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1answer
79 views

Infinitesimal rotation of classical fields: why are rotation group representations important?

I understand that $SO(3)$ representations are important in quantum physics, because eigenspaces of the Hamiltonian are irreps of $SO(3)$ if it is part of the symmetry group. But I don't see the reason ...
0
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1answer
122 views

Why are the Euler-Lagrange equations invariant if we add a surface term to the action?

In the lecture on Noether's theorem and the Lagrange formulation of classical field theories, my professor wrote A symmetry is a field variation that maps solutions to solutions, which is true if ...
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1answer
50 views

Reference request on condensed matter field theory including Classical Field Theory

I was hoping for a reference request for a book on basic/introductory condensed matter field theory. In addition to the usual topics I am looking for books with reference to classical physics ...
2
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5answers
528 views

Euclidean geometry in non-inertial frame

Refer, "The classical theory of Fields" by Landau lifshitz (Chap 3). Consider a disk of radius R, then circumference is $2 \pi R$. Now, make this disk rotate at velocity of the order of c(speed of ...
2
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0answers
189 views

What are the equations of motion for the scalar field in the tetrad formalism?

The action of a massless scalar field in curved spacetime is given by: \begin{equation} S(\phi)=\int d^{4}x \sqrt{-g}\left(g^{\mu\nu}\phi_{,\mu}\phi_{,\nu}\right) \end{equation} Now the action can ...
3
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1answer
89 views

Fermionic Poisson bracket

I'd like to understand the Poisson bracket for fermions in classical field theory defined on a cylinder (with coordinates $(t,x)$, $x$ being the compact direction) and propagating on $T^n$ with ...
1
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1answer
60 views

Classical vacuum and quantum vacuum

How to determine the ground state of a classical field, for example an electromagnetic field? What is the difference between the the ground state of a classical field and that of a quantum field?
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0answers
218 views

Counting Degrees of Freedom in Field Theories

I'm somewhat unsure about how we go about counting degrees of freedom in CFT, and in QFT. Often people talk about field theories as having 'infinite degrees of freedom'. My understanding of this is ...
2
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1answer
123 views

Is it true that the self-force prevents a classical particle from falling into a Coulomb potential? What is the physical explanation of this result? [closed]

In 1943 CJ Eliezer published a paper claiming that the self-force prevents a zero angular momentum particle from ever reaching the center of an attractive Coulomb potential (and what's more that it ...
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0answers
55 views

Why are the particles called irreps of Poincare group? [duplicate]

Why are particle excitations called irreducible representation of the Poincare group? It will be very helpful if someone can illustrate with one concrete example of a particle. EDIT : But how does ...
0
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0answers
21 views

Does a time-evolving gravitational field or potential have any important/interesting effects?

I have learned from classical electromagnetism that a time-evolving magnetic field gives rise to a contribution to an electric field, and vice-versa. Do gravitational fields have an analogous effect ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Lagrangian density with explicit $x_\mu$ dependence

In the Quantum Field Theory book, by Ryder, he says that a Lagrangian density of a field can also be an explicit function of $x_\mu$ if the field interacts with external sources. Can someone give an ...
3
votes
1answer
222 views

effect of a simultaneous local and a global $U(1)$ symmetry breaking

EDIT : I am trying to figure out the effect of symmetry breaking in a $U(1)_Y\times U(1)_Z$ invariant lagrangian where $U(1)_Y$ is local symmetry of the Lagrangian and $U(1)_Z$ is a global symmetry of ...
4
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1answer
202 views

Renormalization in Classical Field Theory

1) The statement that general relativity (GR) is not renormalizable - is it a statement only about the quantization of GR or is it non-renormalizable also as a classical field theory? 2) More ...
4
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0answers
61 views

Reality of the action in QFT

Following Ramond, 1.5 Field Theory, it is mentioned that the classical Lagrangian density in (workable for HEP) QFT theories has to be Real, otherwise total probability is not conserved. Can someone ...
2
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2answers
130 views

Higher rank $\gamma$-matrix question

I read that the higher rank $\gamma$ matrices can be written as alternate commutators and anti-commutators. For example, the rank 3 gamma matrix can be written as $$\gamma^{123} = ...
2
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0answers
95 views

Problems while doing $\dfrac{\partial}{\partial(\partial_\mu \phi)}$ and $\dfrac{\partial}{\partial(\partial_\mu A_\mu)}$

In David Tong's lectures, he gives two Lagrangians as examples to derive the equations of motion: $$\mathcal{L} = \dfrac{1}{2}\eta^{\mu\nu}\,\partial_\mu\phi\,\partial_\nu \phi-\dfrac{1}{2}m^2\phi^2, ...
4
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0answers
95 views

Axion Model Field Theory Problem

This is a homework problem for a field theory class dealing with an axion model. Originally, we are given that $$S[a]=\int_Md^4x \frac{1}{2}(\partial_{\mu}a(x))^2$$ has a continuous global ...
2
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2answers
384 views

The variation of the Lagrangian density under an infinitesimal Lorentz transformation

I'm trying to introduce myself to QFT following these lectures by David Tong. I've started with lecture 1 (Classical Field Theory) and I'm trying to prove that under an infinitesimal Lorentz ...
2
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0answers
76 views

Possible Error in deriving conformal generator

My professor gave me the following derivation for the full generator of the Lorentz transformations. The starting point is to consider a subgroup of the conformal group that leaves the origin fixed ...
0
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0answers
76 views

Conserved charge from conserved current associated with translational invariance

(c.f Di Francesco, 'Conformal Field Theory' P.45) Di Francesco calls the conserved charge arising from the conserved current associated with a translation invariant theory the 'four momentum'. While ...
5
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0answers
60 views

Spin-dependence of the directionality of dipole radiation

I am interested in understanding how and whether the transformation properties of a (classical or quantum) field under rotations or boosts relate in a simple way to the directional dependence of the ...
-2
votes
1answer
66 views

Can a classical (or quantum) field, particularly the EMF, have a frame of reference?

I understand that a massless particle (such as a photon) cannot have a frame of reference. But the electromagnetic field does have mass; does it have a frame of reference? If so, I have a second ...
2
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0answers
104 views

Similarities between laminar-turbulence transition and others like BCS-BEC crossover, quark-hadron transition etc

From my limited readings on fluid dynamics, my understanding is that as the system changes from near-laminar flows to full turbulence, the dimensionless Reynolds number changes from $ R << 1$ to ...
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1answer
275 views

Question about the Noether charge algebra

I'm reading these notes - page 8 and 9 - and I'm a bit confused. If we consider a field $\phi$ (which can be either bosonic or fermionic) transforming as: \begin{equation} \phi(x) \rightarrow \phi(x) ...
4
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2answers
383 views

Hamilton formalism for Dirac spinors

Let's have the Dirac free lagrangian: $$ L = \bar {\Psi} (i\gamma^{\mu}\partial_{\mu} - m) \Psi . $$ I can rewrite it as $$ L = i\Psi^{\dagger}\partial_{0}\Psi - H_{d}, \quad H_{d} = ...
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0answers
134 views

How to do this index notation differentiation?

I am studying classical Maxwell fields and I am stuck on this differentiating part. How can I derive the result given below ? $$\dfrac{\partial}{\partial(\partial A_{\mu}/\partial x_{\nu})} ...
5
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1answer
497 views

On a trick to derive Noether current

Suppose, in whatever dimension and theory, the action $S$ is invariant for a global symmetry with a continuous parameter $\epsilon$. The trick to get the Noether current consists in making the ...
4
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2answers
457 views

Canonical momentum density vs. energy-momentum tensor

Suppose we have a scalar field $\varphi$ with Lagrangian $$ \mathcal{L} = \frac{1}{2} \kappa \left( \frac{\partial \varphi}{\partial x} \right)^2 + \frac{1}{2} \rho \left( \frac{\partial ...
1
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1answer
66 views

Integrating out fields from classical systems

Has anyone ever heard of integrating out fields from classical Lagrangians if they are quadratic?
4
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1answer
171 views

Why does the minimum energy field configuration require the fields to be constant?

I am having a hard time in understanding a well known statement always made in the context of field theory. Background Consider a classical real scalar field theory with Lagrangian density given by ...
3
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1answer
663 views

Noether First and Second Theorem

I have this question related to the the Noether's Theorems. I want to know a rigorous enough enunciation of this theorem, the context is Classical Field Theory without fancy geometrical structures ...
12
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2answers
647 views

Small oscillations of heavy string

I'm solving problem in classical field theory and I have some difficulties. I'm trying to study small oscilations of heavy string with fixed points. First of all I wrote down this Lagrangian: ...
1
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0answers
143 views

Taylor expansion in classical 1D harmonic chain (classical field theory)

I'm struggling with something apparently really easy but not entirely straightforward. In "Condensed Matter Field Theory" of Altland and Simons the classical 1D harmonic chain is treated as ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Symmetry of Euler-Lagrange equations and conservation laws

Continuous symmetry of the action implies a conservation law, but what if equations of motion have a continuous symmetry? Does it imply a conservation law? Also is symmetry of equations of motion ...
4
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1answer
312 views

Can classical systems exhibit “strong coupling”?

Does the concept of strong coupling mean anything in a classical setting? If strong coupling means just an inability to apply perturbative methods to the Hamiltonian, then obviously yes, we can ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Finding Hamilton's equations given a Hamiltonian

I am trying to find Hamilton's equations for a general Hamiltonian given by $$H[u]=\int_\mathbf{R} \phi(u,u_x)dx$$ Suppose $$\frac{\delta f[u]}{\delta u(x)}\equiv \frac{\partial f}{\partial ...
4
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1answer
587 views

Infinite Energy of Point Charges (in the context of classical field theories)

In the context of classical physics,is there any renormalization method to avoid infinite energy of point charges?
3
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0answers
179 views

Questions about classical and quantum scale invariance

This is kind of a continuation of this and this previous questions. Say one has a free "classical" field theory which is scale invariant and one develops a perturbative classical solution for an ...
2
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1answer
208 views

Total energy is extremal for the static solutions of equation of motions

In physics total energy is extremal for the static solutions of equation of motions. Can anyone explain this sentence to me?