The tag has no usage guidance.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

7
votes
1answer
2k views

Noether theorem and classical proof of electric charge conservation

How to prove conservation of electric charge using Noether's theorem according to classical (non-quantum) mechanics? I know the proof based on using Klein–Gordon field, but that derivation use ...
45
votes
7answers
4k views

Do Maxwell's Equations overdetermine the electric and magnetic fields?

Maxwell's equations specify two vector and two scalar (differential) equations. That implies 8 components in the equations. But between vector fields $\vec{E}=(E_x,E_y,E_z)$ and $\vec{B}=(B_x,B_y,B_z)$...
25
votes
6answers
7k views

Does a magnetic field do work on an intrinsic magnetic dipole?

When you release a magnetic dipole in a nonuniform magnetic field, it will accelerate. I understand that for current loops (and other such macroscopic objects) the magnetic moment comes from moving ...
16
votes
9answers
15k views

Recommended books for undergraduate electrodynamics

What books are recommended for an advanced undergraduate course in electrodynamics?
10
votes
2answers
933 views

Trouble understanding the Bohr model of the atom

In this article it says: The electrons can only orbit stably, without radiating, in certain orbits (called by Bohr the "stationary orbits") at a certain discrete set of distances from the nucleus. ...
3
votes
5answers
582 views

Euclidean geometry in non-inertial frame

Refer, "The classical theory of Fields" by Landau lifshitz (Chap 3). Consider a disk of radius R, then circumference is $2 \pi R$. Now, make this disk rotate at velocity of the order of c(speed of ...
25
votes
3answers
6k views

What is the answer to Feynman's Disc Paradox?

[This question is Certified Higgs Free!] Richard Feynman in Lectures on Physics Vol. II Sec. 17-4, "A paradox," describes a problem in electromagnetic induction that did not originate with him, but ...
15
votes
5answers
947 views

Does GR provide a maximum electric field limit?

Does GR provide a limit to the maximum electric field? I've gotten conflicting information regarding this, and am quite confused. I will try to quote exactly when possible so as not to confuse ...
3
votes
1answer
385 views

Induced magnetic field produces electric field and vice versa forever!

So here are the two of Maxwell's laws that I am interested in: So we have the simple circuit (from google): So, before the system goes into steady-state we know that charge slowly accumulates on ...
8
votes
2answers
886 views

What is the mechanism by which magnetic fields do work?

I've seen some conflicted answers to this question in texts and on the web, in the case of a dipole, for example. Do magnetic fields do work directly, or is it their induced electric fields that do ...
16
votes
4answers
754 views

The problem of self-force on point charges

Allow me to preface this by stating that I am a high school student interested in physics and self-studying using a variety of resources, both on- and off-line, primarily GSU's HyperPhysics website, ...
7
votes
2answers
9k views

Video lectures on graduate level Classical Electrodynamics

This is a rather broad question. Does anyone know of good video lectures for graduate level classical electrodynamics?
9
votes
3answers
4k views

Maxwells Equation from Electromagnetic Lagrangian

In Heaviside-Lorentz units the Maxwell's equations are: $$\nabla \cdot \vec{E} = \rho $$ $$ \nabla \times \vec{B} - \frac{\partial \vec{E}}{\partial t} = \vec{J}$$ $$ \nabla \times \vec{E} + \frac{\...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

What is the Lagrangian for a relativistic charge that includes the self-force?

The usual Lagrangian for a relativistically moving charge, as found in most text books, doesn't take into account the self force from it radiating EM energy. So what is the Lagrangian for a ...
14
votes
3answers
1k views

Is classical electromagnetism a dead research field?

Is classical electromagnetism a dead research field? Are there any phenomena within classical electromagnetism that we have no explanation for?
2
votes
2answers
533 views

Magnetic field due to a charge having uniform velocity

Faraday's law states that "Any change in electric field induces a magnetic field and vice versa". I don't see exactly where these fields are induced, but I assume that these fields are induced at each ...
5
votes
4answers
4k views

Method of calculating eddy currents of a conductor, is this correct?

I have a conductor with volume $V$, passing a magnetic field($B$) with velocity($v$): I'm trying to calculate the Eddy currents to figure out the magnitude of the drag force($F_d$) generated the ...
3
votes
5answers
1k views

Is the canonical momentum conserved when a particle moves in magnetic field?

Here is a question about the canonical momentum that I had asked some days ago, but I still have one point that I am not understand. Considering a particle moves in a magnetic field with charge $q$ ...
3
votes
1answer
830 views

electric field of unpolarized light after reflect?

Reflection and transmission (Fresnel equation) of polarized light are treated in many optics or electromagnetism books. If $E_s$ and $E_p$ is incident electric field with s-polarization and p-...
2
votes
3answers
446 views

Why do surfaces act like barriers for electrons?

Say you have a conductor, filled with free electrons. The nuclei have a weak pull on the valence electrons so they are moving around in the conductor. But the electrons don't leave the solid. If you ...
44
votes
1answer
57k views

How does this “simple” electric train work?

In this YouTube video, a dry cell battery, a wound copper wire and a few magnets (see image below) are being used to create what can be described as "train". It looks fascinating but how does this ...
13
votes
4answers
914 views

Can we measure an electromagnetic field?

As far as I can check, the Aharonov-Bohm effect is not -- contrary to what is claimed in the historical paper -- a demonstration that the vector potential $A$ has an intrinsic existence in quantum ...
16
votes
2answers
498 views

Coulomb gauge fixing and “normalizability”

The Setup Let Greek indices be summed over $0,1,\dots, d$ and Latin indices over $1,2,\dots, d$. Consider a vector potential $A_\mu$ on $\mathbb R^{d,1}$ defined to gauge transform as $$ A_\mu\to ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Trouble with the Lorentz law of force: Incompatibility with special relativity and momentum conservation?

In Physical Review Letters, there was a paper recently published: Masud Mansuripur, Trouble with the Lorentz Law of Force: Incompatibility with Special Relativity and Momentum Conservation, Phys. ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Why are EM waves transverse?

I was reading Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics, specifically the section on plane waves. I can see that if we want a transverse wave traveling in the $z$ direction that we are only going to ...
9
votes
1answer
793 views

Recovering all of Maxwell's equations from the variational principle

Whether you can get the first couple of Maxwell equations from a variational principle? In the second volume of the Landau theoretical physics said that it is impossible.
7
votes
2answers
836 views

Does a static electric field and the conservation of momentum give rise to a relationship between $E$, $t$, and some path $s$?

For a static electric field $E$ the conservation of energy gives rise to $$\oint E\cdot ds =0$$ Is there an analogous mathematical expression the conservation of momentum gives rise to?
1
vote
3answers
1k views

The propagation of electric field

In case of a charged particle which is travelling at a uniform velocity, the electric field due to it at a given point doesn't change instantaneously . The reason for this delay in change of electric ...
1
vote
2answers
282 views

Non-linear dynamics of classical hydrogen atom

I'd like to know if there have been attempts in solving the full problem of the dynamics of a classical hydrogen atom. Taking into account Newton equations for the electron and the proton and Maxwell ...
30
votes
4answers
4k views

What is momentum really?

Wikipedia defines momentum as in classical mechanics: In classical mechanics, linear momentum or translational momentum is the product of the mass and velocity of an object. However, an ...
14
votes
5answers
2k views

How many photons are needed to make a light wave?

What is the smallest number of photons needed to make a "light wave"? In other words, how many (coherent?) photons start to exhibit classical behavior? For example, how many photons are needed to get ...
13
votes
4answers
569 views

Is the electromagnetic mass real?

In his Lectures on Physics vol II Ch.28-2 Feynman calculates the field momentum of a moving charged sphere with charge $q$, radius $a$ and velocity $\mathbf{v}$. He finds that the total momentum in ...
15
votes
2answers
2k views

An example which contradict to Newton's 3rd law?

Let a,b be two charged particles. $$\vec{r}_a(0)=\vec{0}$$ $$\vec{r}_b(0)=r\hat{j}$$ $$\vec{v}_a(t)=v_a \hat{i}$$ $$\vec{v}_b(t)=v_b\hat{j}$$ In which both $v_a$ and $v_b$ $<<c$. Then $$\...
7
votes
2answers
842 views

Is there a Hamiltonian for the (classical) electromagnetic field? If so, how can it be derived from the Lagrangian?

The classical Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field is $$\mathcal{L} = -\frac{1}{4\mu_0} F^{\mu \nu} F_{\mu \nu} - J^\mu A_\mu.$$ Is there also a Hamiltonian? If so, how to derive it? I know how ...
3
votes
2answers
433 views

Why is there no induced electric field in the experiment (Faraday's Law)

Below are three circuit diagrams for each of Faraday's experiments that allowed Faraday to come up with Faraday's Law. In Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics Griffiths states (on page 302 of ...
2
votes
0answers
66 views

Confusion in reaction force of Ampere's Force Law [closed]

I am reading Maxwell's "A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism" and I have some confusion in the following pages: The element ds is resolved into its components $\alpha$ and $\beta$;and the ...
7
votes
4answers
828 views

Why does electric field intensity $E$ can be uniquely determined by its divergence and curl? [duplicate]

My question is, the number of following equations $$\nabla\cdot E=\frac{\rho}{\varepsilon}$$ $$\nabla\times E=-\frac{\partial B}{\partial t}$$ is 4 while the number of unknown variables $E=(E_1,E_2,...
6
votes
0answers
249 views

Semiclassical QED and long-range interaction

I'm interested in the (very) low energy limit of quantum electrodynamics. I've seen that taking this limit does not yield Maxwell equations, but a quantum corrected non-linear version of them. If ...
3
votes
2answers
234 views

Problem with Maxwell's theory

What exactly is the problem with classical Maxwell theory and the blowing up of energy at $r=0$? Does it have any other problems on the classical level?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do electrons around nucleus radiate light according to classical physics

As I navigate through physics stackexchange, I noticed Electron model under Maxwell's theory. Electrons radiate light when revolving around nucleus? Why is it so obvious? Note that I do not know ...
4
votes
0answers
137 views

Why is there no induced current in this loop? [closed]

This problem comes from Barron's SAT Subject Test Physics book. A loop of wire and a bar magnet are moving relative to one another. Which motion in the diagrams shown below will NOT induce a ...
3
votes
0answers
113 views

Classical electrodynamics as an $\mathrm{U}(1)$ gauge theory

Preface: I haven't studied QED or any other QFT formally, only by occasionally flipping through books, and having a working knowledge of the mathematics of gauge theories (principal bundles, etc.). ...
3
votes
2answers
184 views

Relating Poyntings theorem to Lenz and Faraday's law?

In system's similar to a motor, where the armature begins to accelerate simultaneously there is induced $-\epsilon$ to reduce the applied current(hence the applied power $P(t)$ is also reduced), or ...
2
votes
4answers
88 views

the relation between frequancy and energy of EM waves

In quantum theory, $$E=\hbar w$$ In classical theory, we have the Poynting vector: $$\vec{S_\space}=\frac{1}{\mu_0}\vec{E_0}\times\vec{B_0}{\cos}^2(kr-wt)$$ given S is energy flux density (the ...
2
votes
1answer
152 views

Current, Current density

edit: Hi I'm trying to find the magnetic field generated by a time dependent oscillating current in the quasistatic case ($|z|,r <<c\omega$) where r is the perpendicular distance from the z-...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

Does the direction of propagation of the natural light is perpendicular to the direction of electric and magnetic field making up natural light? [closed]

I know that the direction of propagation of the wave(light) is perpendicular to the direction of electric and magnetic field in the situation of plane waves. And I want to know the relation between ...
1
vote
4answers
254 views

A question about canonical momentum and arbitrariness for potential in magnetism

The following question confuses me: There exists magnetic field $B_z =- \beta x$ where $x > 0$, and a particle is incident from origin point $(0,0)$ with pisitive charge $q$, mass $m$, and ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Pseudoscalar action in classical field theory

I was reading Landau and Lifschitz's "Classical Field Theory" and came across a comment that the action for electromagnetism must be a scalar, not a pseudoscalar (footnote in section 27). So I was ...
4
votes
1answer
429 views

Classical (or semi-classical) interpretation of photoelectric effect?

This site says that "it has recently been proven that the photoelectric effect can be interpreted classically (or at least semi-classically) in non-particle, wavelike terms". Is anyone familiar with ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Force on Earth due to Sun's radiation pressure

I have been asked by my Classical Electrodynamics professor to calculate the force that the Sun exerts in the Earth's surface due to its radiation pressure supposing that all radiation is absorbed and ...