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2answers
270 views

Frequency of rotating coil

Given a coil initially in the x-y plane, rotating at angular frequency $ \omega $ about the x-axis in a magnetic field in the z-direction. This uniform time varying magnetic field is given by $B_z ...
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1answer
41 views

Electric field in a hollow object

I am currently visiting a course about electrodynamics. In my last lecture it was said that if a hollow sphere is inside of a bigger sphere, but only in the bigger sphere there are charges, the ...
0
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0answers
54 views

Electric fields and the propagation of information [on hold]

Let us consider a charged particle $A$ in a fixed position, and a second particle $B$ at some distance $r$ from $A$. Now $A$ and $B$ will feel a mutual force due to their respective electric fields. ...
0
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1answer
24 views

How is the field of a non-moving charge static if field changes propagate only at the speed of light?

Let us consider a charged particle which is static with respect to a frame of reference $A$. Now suppose that I accelerate the charged particle to a speed $v$. Now when I accelerated it to a speed ...
2
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2answers
47 views

Can an electron borrow momentum from its field?

Let us consider a charged particle moving with uniform velocity $v$. We know that the EM field due to it has some momentum too. If the mass of the particle is $M$, then the momentum of the particle is ...
2
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3answers
52 views

movement of particles in electric field

I am confused about a homework problem. Let's assume we have two electrically charged particles of which we know the charge and mass respectively. Let's say that at first they are fixed at some ...
3
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2answers
153 views

What is the area in Faraday's law if we have only a piece of metal moving in a magnetic field?

If a piece of metal of length $l$ is moving with a speed $v$ in a region where there is a uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it, there will be a potential difference across its terminals ...
2
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2answers
110 views

Electromagnetic reaction force?

The classical (retarded) Lienard-Wiechert scalar and vector potentials describe the electromagnetic field due to an arbitrarily moving electric point charge. Thus given the motion of electron $A$ one ...
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1answer
69 views

Calculating electrodynamic momentum of a dumbbell (consisting of two point charges) in longitudinal motion

I'm working through a paper on momentum in electrodynamics that requires the integration below and would greatly appreciate any help. I'm pretty sure it evaluates to $2/d$ but I can't quite figure ...
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2answers
99 views

Energy conservation in electrodynamic system?

Consider two charged particles initially at rest in the configuration below. Let us assume the following: Starting at time $t=0$, we apply a constant force $f$ to the the bottom particle so that ...
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0answers
23 views

Complete equations of motion in the scattering problem [closed]

How to derive the complete equations of motion for an electron scattered by a proton using Lagrangian formalism?
1
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1answer
45 views

The interaction of a charged particle with its own field

I have seen other questions regarding the mentioned topic. I want an answer to be different in some ways from the answers that were posted in response to the related questions. What exactly are ...
1
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2answers
190 views

Faraday's law and “infinite induction”

I may have confused after thinking too much about Faraday's law. If an emf is induced in a circuit due to some changing magnetic field, the induced current will be in a direction such that the ...
1
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1answer
30 views

Ampere's law, do I include the electric field causing the current?

Let's say I have a long, straight wire with a time varying current, $I$ through it. Now if I take a circular Amperian path around this loop wire (and concentric with it) there is both a current $I$ ...
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3answers
127 views

The propagation of electric field

In case of a charged particle which is travelling at a uniform velocity, the electric field due to it at a given point doesn't change instantaneously . The reason for this delay in change of electric ...
0
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2answers
23 views

Different kinds of time varying EM fields and difference in the way they transfer energy

Instead of broadening up the scope of answer , I would like to divide this question into two parts without any introduction . 1) Do all the time varying EM fields have the ability to transfer energy ...
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3answers
2k views

Maxwells Equation from Electromagnetic Lagrangian

In Heaviside-Lorentz units the Maxwell's equations are: $$\nabla \cdot \vec{E} = \rho $$ $$ \nabla \times \vec{B} - \frac{\partial \vec{E}}{\partial t} = \vec{J}$$ $$ \nabla \times \vec{E} + ...
2
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2answers
61 views

Classical Hall effect when current has neutral charge

Suppose I have a current of both negative and positive charges(I know that there is also current from only negative and only positive charges,I'm not confused) along an infinite wire of square ...
1
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1answer
35 views

Signs in derivation of capacitor discharge differential equation

In deriving the discharge current for a capacitor I have seen two different approaches: By Kirchhoff's law we have: $$ \begin{align} 0 &= I R + \frac{Q}{C}\\ \implies 0 &= \dot I R + ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Momentum carrying fields

Through some of my recent questions I have come to know of fields as an agent which can act as momentum . What is the correct physical picture that I should derive from statements like this ? Where ...
3
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6answers
652 views

Is electromagnetic vector field a sum of E and B?

I have a hard time to fully understand (classical) electromagnetic field theory with respect to Helmholtz's decomposition. Let me start from Helmholtz's theorem: Any vector field of class ...
2
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0answers
50 views

Motion of a charged particle in a “solid” charged sphere (accounting for radiation)

Consider a particle (point charge) with charge $q$ and mass $m$ that crosses into a uniformly charged sphere (with charge $Q$ and radius $R$). The trajectory of the particle is a diameter of the ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

Far Field Diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
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1answer
31 views

A static electron and a radiating electron

Let us consider an electron A, which is at rest in one frame of reference and another electron B which is accelerating in that frame of reference. Now the fields due to electron B are time varying . ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

Why is there no induced electric field in the experiment (Faraday's Law)

Below are three circuit diagrams for each of Faraday's experiments that allowed Faraday to come up with Faraday's Law. In Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics Griffiths states (on page 302 of ...
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0answers
12 views

Electrodynamics of a single ion transport between a dielectric slab

I am trying to solve the mean passage time for a single solvated ion to diffuse through a pore. This pore is surrounded by the medium with a low dielectric permittivity, i.e. around 10. The solvent ...
9
votes
2answers
129 views

Is the electromagnetic mass real?

In his Lectures on Physics vol II Ch.28-2 Feynman calculates the field momentum of a moving charged sphere with charge $q$, radius $a$ and velocity $\mathbf{v}$. He finds that the total momentum in ...
3
votes
1answer
118 views

Motion in a Paul trap: $2n^{\text{th}}$ harmonic with larger amplitude than $n$th harmonic

Using a Paul trap, we captured the motion of a light charged particle (based on a rotating potential applied by AC current). Our rotational frequency was 50 Hz, and so when used FFT on the data, we ...
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2answers
162 views

Drift Speed and Current in Two Different Inertial Frames

We have a long, cylindrical wire carrying a constant current I in an inertial frame. At a distance of R from the center of the wire, the magnitude of magnetic field is $μI/2πR$. What is the magnitude ...
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1answer
52 views

EM radiation explanation [duplicate]

Why is it so that a charged particle when accelerated radiates energy? I tried to think if it might be violating the law of conservation of energy but the energy transferred by the external agent may ...
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2answers
88 views

Electric field 0 everywhere inside Gaussian surface

Gauss's Law shows that the electric field everywhere inside a spherical shell of uniform charge density is $0$. Suppose we have a surface which divides space into two disjoint regions (an interior and ...
4
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1answer
49 views

Does a magnetic field decrease or increase entropy?

My question is just the title: Does a magnetic field decrease or increase the entropy of a system? For example if we apply a magnetic filed to a substance, is the entropy decreased or increased?
2
votes
2answers
136 views

Magnetic field due to a charge having uniform velocity

Faraday's law states that "Any change in electric field induces a magnetic field and vice versa". I don't see exactly where these fields are induced, but I assume that these fields are induced at each ...
0
votes
1answer
135 views

What are the boundary conditions for EM waves normally incident on the interface between two dielectric media?

An EM wave, amplitude $E_0$, frequency $\omega_0$, is incident upon a material with relative permittivity (dielectric function) $$\varepsilon \left( z \right) = \left\{ \begin{gathered}{\varepsilon ...
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0answers
26 views

Interaction between charged particles as seen from two inertial frames of references

Let us consider two charged particles travelling at a uniform velocity, V, as seen from a frame of reference A . Now let us consider a frame of reference, B, which is also travelling at a uniform ...
3
votes
2answers
234 views

Classical Viewpoint on Electromagnetism

Note: This question may be difficult or impossible to answer within the rules of these forums due to its philosophical nature. I will delete the question if I am violating the rules. Onto the ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

potential inside a cylindrical shell in terms of the surface potential?

Given a potential distribution $V(\phi)$ at the surface of an infinite cylindrical shell, is there an easy way to derive the potential inside the cylinder. No charges or currents anywhere.
1
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1answer
277 views

What's the reason behind calling cathode rays tube by the name cathode?

I do believe that maybe due to the accumulation of negative electron on the metal surface so we called it cathode. But the thing is that we have studied that regardless of the polarity, the cathode ...
3
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2answers
155 views

Problem with Maxwell's theory

What exactly is the problem with classical Maxwell theory and the blowing up of energy at $r=0$? Does it have any other problems on the classical level?
0
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0answers
42 views

What are some open problems in classical electrodynamics? [duplicate]

I am about to finish reading 'Introduction to Electrodynamics' by David Griffiths. Throughout the textbook, Griffiths makes frequent references to current literature (mostly articles from American ...
0
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0answers
22 views

Anyone know of a flow chart or list of common/useful consequences of Maxwell's equations?

I just recently started to appreciate the Maxwell equations. I had never really take the time to study them but I feel like I'm finally more familiar with them. I've noticed that it seems like a lot ...
1
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1answer
49 views

What are some practical things one can do with classical electrodynamics and QED?

Many basic types of physics have ready and obvious everyday applications. For instance, basic electromagnetism vector calculus can give great insights into how something as simple as a bar magnate ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Momentum around an accelerated electron

Assume that an electron is accelerated along the +x-axis. The electron will radiate electromagnetic energy and momentum in every direction. But it seems to me that the EM momentum it radiates in ...
5
votes
1answer
97 views

Time reversal in classical electrodynamics

It is known that classical electrodynamics is time reversal invariant if one assumes that the transformation laws under such operation are $$\mathbf E(t,\mathbf x)\mapsto\mathbf E(-t,\mathbf x)$$ ...
6
votes
2answers
329 views

Evidence for electrodynamics in curved spacetime

Field theories in curved spacetime is usually formulated by integrating their Lagrangian over the curved spacetime. For example, for electrodynamics, we have the action $$ S = \int d^4x \left( ...
1
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0answers
28 views

Can a charge moving in an open trajectory qualify as current?

It is sometimes said that a point charge is equivalent to an electric current. If it were a steady current, I should be able to find it from Ampere’s law or Biot-Savart’s law. Even if the current is ...
1
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2answers
75 views

Force on a loop with induced current

Consider an infinitely long ideal solenoid with current $I$, radius $a$, turns per unit length $n$. Put a closed conducting loop around it (radius $b > a$), on a common axis through their centers. ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Induced electric field due to a moving wire

An infinite wire carrying a constant current $I$ in the $\hat{z}$ direction is moving in the $y$ direction at a constant speed $v$. Find the electric field, in the quasistatic approximation, at the ...
1
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0answers
43 views

Equivalence of integrals in Classical Electrodynamics

I have a technical question about a section from Jackson's Classical Electrodynamics 3rd ed. In chapter 14, Jackson derives an expression for $ \frac{d^2I}{d\omega d\Omega} $, the frequency spectrum ...
9
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1answer
506 views

Recovering all of Maxwell's equations from the variational principle

Whether you can get the first couple of Maxwell equations from a variational principle? In the second volume of the Landau theoretical physics said that it is impossible.