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3
votes
1answer
132 views

Motion in a Paul trap: $2n^{\text{th}}$ harmonic with larger amplitude than $n$th harmonic

Using a Paul trap, we captured the motion of a light charged particle (based on a rotating potential applied by AC current). Our rotational frequency was 50 Hz, and so when used FFT on the data, we ...
3
votes
0answers
103 views

Accelerated electromagnetic system leads to divergent calculation?

Consider the above system comprising a pair of oppositely charged parallel plates, connected by a rigid rod of length $r$, constrained to move in the x-direction. The forces on the plates from the ...
3
votes
1answer
346 views

What is the direction of an accelerated particle due to a variation of magnetic field?

Let an ion of charge $q$ and mass $m$ traverse a circular orbit of radius $R$ under the influence of a uniform magnetic field $\mathbf{B}=B(r)\,\hat{\boldsymbol{z}}$, where $r$ is the distance from ...
3
votes
2answers
182 views

What is the area in Faraday's law if we have only a piece of metal moving in a magnetic field?

If a piece of metal of length $l$ is moving with a speed $v$ in a region where there is a uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it, there will be a potential difference across its terminals ...
2
votes
5answers
453 views

Euclidean geometry in non-inertial frame

Refer, "The classical theory of Fields" by Landau lifshitz (Chap 3). Consider a disk of radius R, then circumference is $2 \pi R$. Now, make this disk rotate at velocity of the order of c(speed of ...
2
votes
4answers
249 views

Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields?

The Maxwell's equation $\boldsymbol{\nabla}\cdot \textbf{E}(\textbf{r})=\frac{\rho(\textbf{r})}{\epsilon_0}$ is derived from the Gauss law in electrostatics (which is in turn derived from Coulomb's ...
2
votes
2answers
98 views

Classical Hall effect when current has neutral charge

Suppose I have a current of both negative and positive charges(I know that there is also current from only negative and only positive charges,I'm not confused) along an infinite wire of square ...
2
votes
2answers
159 views

Why does the classical electrodynamics Lagrangian density equation have a “field” term and an “interaction” term?

On Wikipedia's page on classical electrodynamics, they state the Lagrangian density equation as follows \begin{equation} \mathcal{L} = \mathcal{L}_{\text{field}} + \mathcal{L}_{\text{int}} = ...
2
votes
1answer
252 views

Poisson's equation for time dependent charge

Is Poisson's equation valid for a time dependent charge density? I think Poisson's equation is valid just for electrostatic fields. But I saw a paper that's used this equation for time dependent ...
2
votes
2answers
831 views

Find E and B from vector potential

I have a vector potential given by: $\mathbf{A}(x,t) = \mathbf{e}_{y}\frac{1}{2} e^{-(x-ct)^{2}/{4a^{2}}}$ Now, the question is "Determine the E and B under the condition that the scalar potential ...
2
votes
3answers
66 views

movement of particles in electric field

I am confused about a homework problem. Let's assume we have two electrically charged particles of which we know the charge and mass respectively. Let's say that at first they are fixed at some ...
2
votes
4answers
390 views

Why ONLY Maxwell's equations are the basic equations of electromagnetism?

In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know: is this(to assume that there is no requirement of any other ...
2
votes
1answer
152 views

Conjugate momentum is not gauge invariant

The conjugate momentum of a charged particle moving in a uniform magnetic field is given by $$\vec p=m\vec v+q \vec A$$ This expression is not unique because $\vec A$ is not unique. $\vec A$ is not ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

Is charge 'localization' implicit in the idea of current?

If it was possible for charge to assume arbitrary densities, like we often see electrostatic exercises, and one could spread charge density uniformly over a ring, then how one would, theoretically, ...
2
votes
3answers
170 views

Self-energy of electron from classical reasoning

If it takes energy to group charge together(self energy) how can it be possible for every single electrons, etc, to have exactly same amount of charge? (think of if we hold some sand in our hand, then ...
2
votes
2answers
174 views

Textbook on classical E&M in curved spacetime

Can anyone recommend a good reference for classical electrodynamics that goes over electrodynamics in curved spacetime that doesn't assume much knowledge of GR -- that is it builds up the tensor ...
2
votes
5answers
656 views

Is the canonical momentum conserved when a particle moves in magnetic field?

Here is a question about the canonical momentum that I had asked some days ago, but I still have one point that I am not understand. Considering a particle moves in a magnetic field with charge $q$ ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

Point charges in a sphere

If we put N point charges (with charge +q) in a sphere with radius R and the charges can move freely in the sphere but can't get out of it, where will the charges go to and what will be the ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Demagnetisation by throwing a magnet

I tried to answer this question in a book about electrodynamics: How to demagnetise a permanent magnet, ie. described by $ D_T$ change into described by (0,0) I figured out about heating it up ...
2
votes
3answers
803 views

How do the electric or magnetic fields contain momentum?

I have recently come to know that the electric and magnetic field contain both linear and angular momenta, which are known functions of the electric and magnetic fields at any given point in space and ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

Current, Current density

edit: Hi I'm trying to find the magnetic field generated by a time dependent oscillating current in the quasistatic case ($|z|,r <<c\omega$) where r is the perpendicular distance from the ...
2
votes
1answer
218 views

Greens reciprocity theorem

The Greens reciprocity theorem is usually proved by using the Greens second identity. Why don't we prove it in the following "direct" way, which sounds more intuitive: $$\int_{\text{all ...
2
votes
2answers
53 views

What is light localisation?

Reading about plasmonic nanoparticles I faced the term "localised light". How can one localise light? What are applications of it?
2
votes
1answer
165 views

Expression for maximum energy transfer to electron by fast moving charge

Suppose a charge $q = +Z e$ is moving along positive $+x$ direction with electron below $x-$axis and the charge is moving fast enough to consider electron at rest, then what is the maximum value of ...
2
votes
2answers
899 views

What is the conserved canonical momentum for a relativistically moving charge in a static Coulomb electric field?

The canonical momentum is a fundamental conserved quantity from Noether's theorem for translational invariance of the Lagrangian. Yet I'm finding it very difficult to see its derivation, or even a ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Will two opposing magnetic fields cancel out?

When a conductor induces eddy currents that creates a magnetic field opposing the change that created it, would the two fields at some point cancel out? Imagine the change to be so great, it ...
2
votes
2answers
117 views

Why do high voltage transmission line workers need a Faraday cage suit?

In this video the high voltage transmission line workers are wearing a Faraday cage suit. Why is this needed? Without the Faraday cage, the resistance of the human would be very high compared to the ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

If time-like paths are geodesics, what physical principle applies to space-like intervals?

If I have a number of particles interacting with one another locally, then the center of mass of the system moves along a geodesic. Taking this further with the particles interacting via an EM field, ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

Is it true that the self-force prevents a classical particle from falling into a Coulomb potential? What is the physical explanation of this result? [closed]

In 1943 CJ Eliezer published a paper claiming that the self-force prevents a zero angular momentum particle from ever reaching the center of an attractive Coulomb potential (and what's more that it ...
2
votes
2answers
245 views

Magnetic field due to a charge having uniform velocity

Faraday's law states that "Any change in electric field induces a magnetic field and vice versa". I don't see exactly where these fields are induced, but I assume that these fields are induced at each ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

Falling charged objects: energy conservation paradox?

Imagine that we start with two oppositely charged objects on the ground, separated by a distance $d$, with charges $+q$, $-q$ and masses $m$. We raise them both up to a height $h$. In doing so we ...
2
votes
1answer
299 views

Total Momentum From a Standing Electromagnetic Wave

How does one show the momentum imparted to a perfect conducting resonance cavity (boundary) of any shape by a classical standing electromagnetic wave inside is zero? It should be by conservation of ...
2
votes
1answer
333 views

What are hot electrons?

What are they? How are they created? And what do they have to do with plasmons? I searched the web, but I would like more reliable and straightforward sources.
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Magnetic field of uniformly charged rotating hollow sphere

I want to compute the magnetic field due to a homogeneously charged, rotating sphere with radius $R$, angular velocity $\vec{\omega} = \omega\hat{z}$ and total charge $Q$. I want to use Biot-Savart ...
2
votes
1answer
105 views

Angular momenta of photon

$A^\mu$ can have multipole expansions in classical electrodynamics. This gives rise to dipole photon, quadrupole photon etc. For dipole photon $j=1$ (In electrodynamics books they write it as $l=1$). ...
2
votes
3answers
283 views

Why do surfaces act like barriers for electrons?

Say you have a conductor, filled with free electrons. The nuclei have a weak pull on the valence electrons so they are moving around in the conductor. But the electrons don't leave the solid. If you ...
2
votes
2answers
749 views

Magnet and energy conservation

If we consider a steel ball falling under gravity in a cup (potential well) and being stopped at the bottom by an obstacle then energy conservation implies that the gravitational potential energy has ...
2
votes
1answer
231 views

Question on 1st order Lagrangian Derivation in Faddeev-Jackiw Formalism

I'm looking at this reference (sorry it's a postscript file, but I can't find a pdf version on the web. This paper describes a similar procedure). The topic is the Faddeev-Jackiw treatment of ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

Torque on a wire loop from straight wire [closed]

I need to show that the torque on this wire loop is $$N = \frac{\mu_0}{\pi} 2abdII' \frac{(b^2+d^2)\sin(\theta)}{b^4+d^4-2b^2d^2\cos(2\theta)}$$ The where $\theta$, is the angle between the loop ...
2
votes
0answers
76 views

Perpetual motion in electric dipole restricted to a circular path with a charge at the centre

This problem is from Griffith's Introduction to Electrodynamics (4th Ed.), Problem 4.31. A point charge $Q$ is "nailed down" on a table. Around it, at radius $R$, is a frictionless circular ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Are energy and momentum separable for EM waves

Everywhere I get to read statements like EM radiations and EM fields carry "energy as well as momentum " . I wonder if energy and momentum are inalienable . Is it possible for a field to carry only ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Time changing potential gives rise to “force”?

Imagine a charged particle inside a Faraday cage (i.e. charge on outside, zero electric field inside, but non-zero electric potential on the inside). Suppose the charge distributed on the outside of ...
2
votes
2answers
64 views

Can an electron borrow momentum from its field?

Let us consider a charged particle moving with uniform velocity $v$. We know that the EM field due to it has some momentum too. If the mass of the particle is $M$, then the momentum of the particle is ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Electric field in a hollow object

I am currently visiting a course about electrodynamics. In my last lecture it was said that if a hollow sphere is inside of a bigger sphere, but only in the bigger sphere there are charges, the ...
2
votes
0answers
74 views

Motion of a charged particle in a “solid” charged sphere (accounting for radiation)

Consider a particle (point charge) with charge $q$ and mass $m$ that crosses into a uniformly charged sphere (with charge $Q$ and radius $R$). The trajectory of the particle is a diameter of the ...
2
votes
2answers
122 views

Momentum around an accelerated electron

Assume that an electron is accelerated along the +x-axis. The electron will radiate electromagnetic energy and momentum in every direction. But it seems to me that the EM momentum it radiates in ...
2
votes
0answers
50 views

Are there limits to human/devices perception?

As far as i know, measurement devices present measurements based on something that affects the device's particles, for instance, forces, heat, tension, voltage... My question is, given that every ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

Magnetic Multipole Tensor

When the electric scalar potential is expanded into spherical coordinates, one gets \begin{align} \phi (\vec r) = \frac{1}{4\pi\varepsilon_0} \sum_{l=0}^{\infty} \sum_{m=-l}^l ...
2
votes
0answers
94 views

Induced emf in a circular conducting wheel

Consider a conducting wheel with $N \in \mathbb{N}$ spokes which is completely in a homogenous magnetic field $\vec{B}$ perpendicular to the wheel plane. ...
2
votes
2answers
58 views

Reference on electrodynamics with tempered distributions

Back in my undergrad I had a course on classical electrodynamics where the fields had values in the space of tempered distributions. In this way one could correctly treat self-interaction and ...