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3
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1answer
74 views

Are the conducting electrons in a metal counted as free or bound charges?

Caused by another question on the propagation of EM waves in a metal, I got a bit confused on the notion of free and bound charges in a metal (sometimes called induced or external). Are the free ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Introductory literature on the multipole expansions including toroidal moments

I wish to understand the general idea of the multipole expansion in the context of classical electrodynamics and, especially, the concept of the toroidal moments. All the papers on the subject I've ...
3
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1answer
303 views

A question about the Thomson experiment

Recently, I was studying about Thomson's experiment with cathode rays. My textbook shows it like this. It says: When only electric field is applied, the electrons deviate from their path and ...
3
votes
1answer
885 views

What are hot electrons?

What are they? How are they created? And what do they have to do with plasmons? I searched the web, but I would like more reliable and straightforward sources.
3
votes
2answers
61 views

Why is radiation for an ultrarelativistic charge zero on axis?

I attribute it to the fact that for an ultrarelativistic charge the field is contracted and essentially there are only fields in the transverse direction and nothing longitudinally (wrt the charges ...
3
votes
2answers
291 views

Can the $\vec H$-field have non-zero divergence? Does an $\vec H$-field monopole exist?

We know that, $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec B=0$ but $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec H\neq 0$, if $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec M \neq 0$. Does it mean that, in those cases $\vec H$-field has poles although $\vec ...
3
votes
2answers
542 views

Frequency of rotating coil

Given a coil initially in the x-y plane, rotating at angular frequency $ \omega $ about the x-axis in a magnetic field in the z-direction. This uniform time varying magnetic field is given by $B_z ...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

Eddy currents Vs. Inducing EMF in opposing the change?

In the following circuit there is a power supply applying a voltage(+$V$) to a circuit with resistance ($R$), current($I$) is now flowing in the circuit, and there is a movable part like so: The ...
3
votes
2answers
345 views

Why do high voltage transmission line workers need a Faraday cage suit?

In this video the high voltage transmission line workers are wearing a Faraday cage suit. Why is this needed? Without the Faraday cage, the resistance of the human would be very high compared to the ...
3
votes
1answer
266 views

Induced magnetic field produces electric field and vice versa forever!

So here are the two of Maxwell's laws that I am interested in: So we have the simple circuit (from google): So, before the system goes into steady-state we know that charge slowly accumulates on ...
3
votes
2answers
351 views

Why is there no induced electric field in the experiment (Faraday's Law)

Below are three circuit diagrams for each of Faraday's experiments that allowed Faraday to come up with Faraday's Law. In Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics Griffiths states (on page 302 of ...
3
votes
2answers
207 views

Electromagnetic reaction force?

The classical (retarded) Lienard-Wiechert scalar and vector potentials describe the electromagnetic field due to an arbitrarily moving electric point charge. Thus given the motion of electron $A$ one ...
3
votes
1answer
295 views

Physical interpretation of Green's theorem with Dirichlet boundary condition

The potential is given by $$\Phi(\mathbf{x})=\int_V d^3x' G_D(\mathbf{x},\mathbf{x'})\rho(\mathbf{x'})-\frac{1}{4\pi}\oint_S d^2x'\frac{\partial G_D(\mathbf{x},\mathbf{x'})}{\partial ...
3
votes
2answers
157 views

When to use which representation for an electric field

In class we covered three types of possibilities to evaluate the electric field for static problems. Unfortunately, most physics textbooks cover these ways without addressing the question of ...
3
votes
1answer
140 views

Time reversal invariance and boundary conditions in electrodynamics

This is really several related questions... The equations of classical electrodynamics are time-reversal invariant. However, when we solve the equations for a particular system of charges it is ...
3
votes
1answer
438 views

Why is there no (time derivative of charge density) in the $B$ field in Jefimenko's equations?

I was going through Griffiths chapter on potentials and fields just to brush up on a few old things. He gets to Jefimenko's equations by this general path: Maxwell's equations Introduce scalar and ...
3
votes
2answers
258 views

Magnetostatics of Current-Carrying wire

A question has been nagging at me about Faraday's Law as related to a wire with a constant current: If you have a circular loop of wire with some small resistivity, connected to a battery so that it ...
3
votes
0answers
44 views

c “Propagation” in Weber Electrodynamics [closed]

The telegraph model of Weber-Gauss, relying on Weber's electrodynamics, modeled instantaneous action at a distance of the electric scalar potential (Coulomb potential) manifesting as propagation of ...
3
votes
0answers
197 views

Free charge movement in an electric field - including bremsstrahlung

Let us imagine a free, negatively charged object that is in rest and placed in an elecric field of a point positive charge. The positive charge has a huge mass and cannot move, so we consider only the ...
3
votes
0answers
107 views

Accelerated electromagnetic system leads to divergent calculation?

Consider the above system comprising a pair of oppositely charged parallel plates, connected by a rigid rod of length $r$, constrained to move in the x-direction. The forces on the plates from the ...
3
votes
1answer
420 views

What is the direction of an accelerated particle due to a variation of magnetic field?

Let an ion of charge $q$ and mass $m$ traverse a circular orbit of radius $R$ under the influence of a uniform magnetic field $\mathbf{B}=B(r)\,\hat{\boldsymbol{z}}$, where $r$ is the distance from ...
2
votes
5answers
528 views

Euclidean geometry in non-inertial frame

Refer, "The classical theory of Fields" by Landau lifshitz (Chap 3). Consider a disk of radius R, then circumference is $2 \pi R$. Now, make this disk rotate at velocity of the order of c(speed of ...
2
votes
4answers
402 views

Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields?

The Maxwell's equation $\boldsymbol{\nabla}\cdot \textbf{E}(\textbf{r})=\frac{\rho(\textbf{r})}{\epsilon_0}$ is derived from the Gauss law in electrostatics (which is in turn derived from Coulomb's ...
2
votes
1answer
167 views

Method of image charge for cylindrical conductor

I am simply puzzled that only for spherical and planar conducting surfaces the method of images is applied. Is it (really) impossible to find image charge or charge distribution which can simulate the ...
2
votes
2answers
128 views

Classical Hall effect when current has neutral charge

Suppose I have a current of both negative and positive charges(I know that there is also current from only negative and only positive charges,I'm not confused) along an infinite wire of square ...
2
votes
4answers
461 views

Why ONLY Maxwell's equations are the basic equations of electromagnetism?

In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know: is this(to assume that there is no requirement of any other ...
2
votes
2answers
249 views

Why does the classical electrodynamics Lagrangian density equation have a “field” term and an “interaction” term?

On Wikipedia's page on classical electrodynamics, they state the Lagrangian density equation as follows \begin{equation} \mathcal{L} = \mathcal{L}_{\text{field}} + \mathcal{L}_{\text{int}} = ...
2
votes
1answer
344 views

Poisson's equation for time dependent charge

Is Poisson's equation valid for a time dependent charge density? I think Poisson's equation is valid just for electrostatic fields. But I saw a paper that's used this equation for time dependent ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Find E and B from vector potential

I have a vector potential given by: $\mathbf{A}(x,t) = \mathbf{e}_{y}\frac{1}{2} e^{-(x-ct)^{2}/{4a^{2}}}$ Now, the question is "Determine the E and B under the condition that the scalar potential ...
2
votes
3answers
77 views

movement of particles in electric field

I am confused about a homework problem. Let's assume we have two electrically charged particles of which we know the charge and mass respectively. Let's say that at first they are fixed at some ...
2
votes
1answer
185 views

Conjugate momentum is not gauge invariant

The conjugate momentum of a charged particle moving in a uniform magnetic field is given by $$\vec p=m\vec v+q \vec A$$ This expression is not unique because $\vec A$ is not unique. $\vec A$ is not ...
2
votes
2answers
66 views

Is charge 'localization' implicit in the idea of current?

If it was possible for charge to assume arbitrary densities, like we often see electrostatic exercises, and one could spread charge density uniformly over a ring, then how one would, theoretically, ...
2
votes
3answers
192 views

Self-energy of electron from classical reasoning

If it takes energy to group charge together(self energy) how can it be possible for every single electrons, etc, to have exactly same amount of charge? (think of if we hold some sand in our hand, then ...
2
votes
2answers
193 views

Textbook on classical E&M in curved spacetime

Can anyone recommend a good reference for classical electrodynamics that goes over electrodynamics in curved spacetime that doesn't assume much knowledge of GR -- that is it builds up the tensor ...
2
votes
1answer
92 views

Does the 1-D poisson's equation have monotonic potentials if $\rho=\rho(\phi(z))$?

I am solving the 1-D poisson equation: $$\frac{d^2 \phi}{dz^2}=-4\pi\rho(\phi)$$ with the additional requirement that $\rho(\phi(z=0))=0$. If I start by multiplying each side by $\frac{d\phi}{d z}$ ...
2
votes
5answers
965 views

Is the canonical momentum conserved when a particle moves in magnetic field?

Here is a question about the canonical momentum that I had asked some days ago, but I still have one point that I am not understand. Considering a particle moves in a magnetic field with charge $q$ ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

Determination of radiation pressure

Consider the incidence of an electromagnetic wave on the plane $x=0$. We have that: $$f_x=\frac{dF}{dV}$$ $f_x$ is the volumic force density on the medium. My doubt is purely mathematical. I ...
2
votes
4answers
82 views

the relation between frequancy and energy of EM waves

In quantum theory, $$E=\hbar w$$ In classical theory, we have the Poynting vector: $$\vec{S_\space}=\frac{1}{\mu_0}\vec{E_0}\times\vec{B_0}{\cos}^2(kr-wt)$$ given S is energy flux density (the ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Point charges in a sphere

If we put N point charges (with charge +q) in a sphere with radius R and the charges can move freely in the sphere but can't get out of it, where will the charges go to and what will be the ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Penning Trap Simulation

I'm currently working on a particle tracker and I would like to implement a Penning trap. I think I might have a problem with the field of the electrical quadrupole. My idea was to place 2 dipoles and ...
2
votes
1answer
116 views

Demagnetisation by throwing a magnet

I tried to answer this question in a book about electrodynamics: How to demagnetise a permanent magnet, ie. described by $ D_T$ change into described by (0,0) I figured out about heating it up ...
2
votes
1answer
128 views

Current, Current density

edit: Hi I'm trying to find the magnetic field generated by a time dependent oscillating current in the quasistatic case ($|z|,r <<c\omega$) where r is the perpendicular distance from the ...
2
votes
1answer
365 views

Greens reciprocity theorem

The Greens reciprocity theorem is usually proved by using the Greens second identity. Why don't we prove it in the following "direct" way, which sounds more intuitive: $$\int_{\text{all ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

What is light localisation?

Reading about plasmonic nanoparticles I faced the term "localised light". How can one localise light? What are applications of it?
2
votes
1answer
217 views

Expression for maximum energy transfer to electron by fast moving charge

Suppose a charge $q = +Z e$ is moving along positive $+x$ direction with electron below $x-$axis and the charge is moving fast enough to consider electron at rest, then what is the maximum value of ...
2
votes
2answers
974 views

What is the conserved canonical momentum for a relativistically moving charge in a static Coulomb electric field?

The canonical momentum is a fundamental conserved quantity from Noether's theorem for translational invariance of the Lagrangian. Yet I'm finding it very difficult to see its derivation, or even a ...
2
votes
2answers
62 views
+50

Relating Poyntings theorem to Lenz and Faraday's law?

In system's similar to a motor, where the armature begins to accelerate simultaneously there is induced $-\epsilon$ to reduce the applied current(hence the applied power $P(t)$ is also reduced), or ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Time dependent electric field: Mathematical expansion for local electric field

In many articles and books I see that local electric field is expanded as $$\vec E_0(\vec r(t)) = \vec E_0(\vec R_0) − (\vec a(t) \cdot \nabla) \vec E_0(\vec R_0) \cos(\Omega t) + \ldots $$ For ...
2
votes
1answer
211 views

Will two opposing magnetic fields cancel out?

When a conductor induces eddy currents that creates a magnetic field opposing the change that created it, would the two fields at some point cancel out? Imagine the change to be so great, it ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

If time-like paths are geodesics, what physical principle applies to space-like intervals?

If I have a number of particles interacting with one another locally, then the center of mass of the system moves along a geodesic. Taking this further with the particles interacting via an EM field, ...