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4
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1answer
105 views

What is the intensity of this light?

I am struggling with a derivation that calculates the cross sections for Mie scattering and since the incident light is considered to be a x-polarized plane wave I thought that we would have $$I_i = ...
4
votes
1answer
38 views

Connections of iterative solvers for large systems of equation in Physics?

I am trying to find the domains in physics where solving large systems of equations is computationally expensive. The sparse systems are of my particular interest, where the input matrix A is in GBs ...
4
votes
1answer
384 views

Transverse current equivalence in Coulomb gauge

I have a question concerning transverse (solenoidal) current in the Coulomb gauge. This current is the one that enables the radiation, since we have a wave equation for the vector potential: ...
4
votes
0answers
98 views

Complex integration by shifting the contour [migrated]

In section 12.11 of Jackson's Classical Electrodynamics, he evaluates an integral involved in the Green function solution to the 4-potential wave equation. Here it is: $\int_{-\infty}^\infty dk_0 ...
4
votes
2answers
128 views

Instantaneous Coulomb interaction in QED

It seems I am stuck with a (at a first sight) trivial problem. It's from the "Quarks and Leptons" (Halzen, Martin) book page $141$, where one considers the following integral: $$\tag{1} T_{fi} = ...
3
votes
3answers
350 views

What does the * mean in spherical harmonics?

In Jackson's book about classical electrodynamics, this formula comes up: $$q_{lm} = \int \mathrm d^3 x' \, Y^*_{lm}\left(\theta', \phi'\right) r'^l \rho\left(\vec x'\right)$$ What does that $^*$ ...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

Tensor notation

I'm trying to understand the Maxwell Stress tensor notation. I'm given that each element in the tensor is given by ...
3
votes
1answer
180 views

Missing terms in Hamiltonian after Legendre transformation of Lagrangian

Short question Given any Lagrangian density of fields one could possibly conceive, is it the case that after one has performed a Legendre transformation, if the Hamiltonian is then expressed in terms ...
3
votes
2answers
56 views

Showing that Coloumb and Lorentz Gauges are indeed valid Gauge Transformations?

I'm working my way through Griffith's "Introduction to Electrodynamics". In Ch. 10, gauge transformations are introduced. The author shows that, given any magnetic potential $\textbf{A}_0$ and ...
3
votes
2answers
51 views

Are all fluorophores dipoles?

Lately I'm reading about surface enhanced fluorescence. In many articles I can see that fluorophores are called "dipoles". Is it because that they can be modelled by a vibrating electric dipole? Or ...
3
votes
3answers
707 views

Why are the classical electron radius, the Bohr radius and the Compton wavelength of an electron related to each other?

Using the definition of the fine-structure constant $\alpha = \frac{4 \pi \epsilon_0 \hbar c}{e^2}$ and the Compton wavelength of an electron $\lambda_c = \frac{h}{m_e c}$ the classical electron ...
3
votes
2answers
85 views

Utility of gauge four-potential $A_{\mu}$ (as opposed to electric and magnetic fields ${\bf E}$ and ${\bf B}$) in E&M?

The action for an electromagnetic field with source charges is given by $$S= \int \left\{ \frac{1}{4\mu_0}F^{\mu\nu}F_{\mu\nu} - J^\mu A_\mu \right\}dx$$ By setting $dS=0$ and taking the Lorenz ...
3
votes
2answers
136 views

Classical Viewpoint on Electromagnetism

Note: This question may be difficult or impossible to answer within the rules of these forums due to its philosophical nature. I will delete the question if I am violating the rules. Onto the ...
3
votes
1answer
176 views

Is Newton's third compatible with retarded Lorentz force?

In Griffiths Introduction to electrodynamics it is said that Newton's third law is not valid in electrodynamics, but, in the example given, the it does not consider the retarded values for the fields ...
3
votes
6answers
1k views

How do we visualise antenna reception of individua radiowave photons building up to a resonant AC current on the antenna?

I am a chemical/biological scientist by trade and wish to understand how quantum EM phenomena translates to our more recognizable classical world. In particular I want to get a mechanistic picture of ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

A question about the Thomson experiment

Recently, I was studying about Thomson's experiment with cathode rays. My textbook shows it like this. It says: When only electric field is applied, the electrons deviate from their path and ...
3
votes
1answer
85 views

Current, Current density

edit: Hi I'm trying to find the magnetic field generated by a time dependent oscillating current in the quasistatic case ($|z|,r <<c\omega$) where r is the perpendicular distance from the ...
3
votes
2answers
55 views

Why is radiation for an ultrarelativistic charge zero on axis?

I attribute it to the fact that for an ultrarelativistic charge the field is contracted and essentially there are only fields in the transverse direction and nothing longitudinally (wrt the charges ...
3
votes
2answers
126 views

Can the $\vec H$-field have non-zero divergence? Does an $\vec H$-field monopole exist?

We know that, $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec B=0$ but $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec H\neq 0$, if $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec M \neq 0$. Does it mean that, in those cases $\vec H$-field has poles although $\vec ...
3
votes
2answers
131 views

When to use which representation for an electric field

In class we covered three types of possibilities to evaluate the electric field for static problems. Unfortunately, most physics textbooks cover these ways without addressing the question of ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Time reversal invariance and boundary conditions in electrodynamics

This is really several related questions... The equations of classical electrodynamics are time-reversal invariant. However, when we solve the equations for a particular system of charges it is ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Did the Goudsmit-Uhlenbeck analysis of spin consider relativity?

It's frequently mentioned in introductory quantum mechanics texts that Goudsmit and Uhlenbeck conjectured that the magnetic moment of an electron was due to angular momentum arising from the electron ...
3
votes
1answer
169 views

Orthogonality between $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ waves with space-dependent amplitudes

I am able to prove in a few lines that the electrodynamic field vectors $\vec{E}$, $\vec{H}$ and $\vec{S}$ are all orthogonal to each other considering that $\vec{E}$ and $\vec{H}$ are coherent plane ...
3
votes
1answer
164 views

What is the direction of an accelerated particle due to a variation of magnetic field?

Let an ion of charge $q$ and mass $m$ traverse a circular orbit of radius $R$ under the influence of a uniform magnetic field $\mathbf{B}=B(r)\,\hat{\boldsymbol{z}}$, where $r$ is the distance from ...
3
votes
2answers
205 views

Magnetostatics of Current-Carrying wire

A question has been nagging at me about Faraday's Law as related to a wire with a constant current: If you have a circular loop of wire with some small resistivity, connected to a battery so that it ...
3
votes
0answers
134 views

Free charge movement in an electric field - including bremsstrahlung

Let us imagine a free, negatively charged object that is in rest and placed in an elecric field of a point positive charge. The positive charge has a huge mass and cannot move, so we consider only the ...
3
votes
0answers
85 views

Vector potential and gauge in electromagnetism

In a paper by Zimmerman [JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS 114, 044907 (2013)], it is stated that the Lorenz gauge in electromagnetism is the only gauge with real physical meaning. How do I reconcile this ...
3
votes
1answer
99 views

Motion in a Paul trap: $2n$th harmonic with larger amplitude than $n$th harmonic

Using a Paul trap, we captured the motion of a light charged particle (based on a rotating potential applied by AC current). Our rotational frequency was 50 Hz, and so when used FFT on the data, we ...
3
votes
0answers
94 views

Accelerated electromagnetic system leads to divergent calculation?

Consider the above system comprising a pair of oppositely charged parallel plates, connected by a rigid rod of length $r$, constrained to move in the x-direction. The forces on the plates from the ...
2
votes
2answers
142 views

Illegal gauge condition in electrodynamics

Just a quick sanity check here: I'm preparing a tutorial for a class on classical electrodynamics and I wanted to show an example of a gauge condition which leads to a contradiction, so I simply ...
2
votes
2answers
235 views

Find E and B from vector potential

I have a vector potential given by: $\mathbf{A}(x,t) = \mathbf{e}_{y}\frac{1}{2} e^{-(x-ct)^{2}/{4a^{2}}}$ Now, the question is "Determine the E and B under the condition that the scalar potential ...
2
votes
4answers
236 views

Why ONLY Maxwell's equations are the basic equations of electromagnetism?

In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know: is this(to assume that there is no requirement of any other ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

Conjugate momentum is not gauge invariant

The conjugate momentum of a charged particle moving in a uniform magnetic field is given by $$\vec p=m\vec v+q \vec A$$ This expression is not unique because $\vec A$ is not unique. $\vec A$ is not ...
2
votes
1answer
167 views

Lorentz force equation from relativistic Lagrangian

The relativistic Lagrangian is given by $$L = - m_0 c^2 \sqrt{1 - \frac{u^2}{c^2}} + \frac{q}{c} (\vec u \cdot \vec A) - q \Phi $$ I need to derive, $\displaystyle \frac{d\vec p}{dt} = q \left( \vec E ...
2
votes
2answers
120 views

Textbook on classical E&M in curved spacetime

Can anyone recommend a good reference for classical electrodynamics that goes over electrodynamics in curved spacetime that doesn't assume much knowledge of GR -- that is it builds up the tensor ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Charge vs Charge Density in classical electrodynamics

What is assumed to be a more fundamental physical quantity in classical electrodynamics. The charge density as a scalar field or the physical entity charge.
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Is charge 'localization' implicit in the idea of current?

If it was possible for charge to assume arbitrary densities, like we often see electrostatic exercises, and one could spread charge density uniformly over a ring, then how one would, theoretically, ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Demagnetisation by throwing a magnet

I tried to answer this question in a book about electrodynamics: How to demagnetise a permanent magnet, ie. described by $ D_T$ change into described by (0,0) I figured out about heating it up ...
2
votes
2answers
45 views

What is light localisation?

Reading about plasmonic nanoparticles I faced the term "localised light". How can one localise light? What are applications of it?
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Expression for maximum energy transfer to electron by fast moving charge

Suppose a charge $q = +Z e$ is moving along positive $+x$ direction with electron below $x-$axis and the charge is moving fast enough to consider electron at rest, then what is the maximum value of ...
2
votes
2answers
790 views

What is the conserved canonical momentum for a relativistically moving charge in a static Coulomb electric field?

The canonical momentum is a fundamental conserved quantity from Noether's theorem for translational invariance of the Lagrangian. Yet I'm finding it very difficult to see its derivation, or even a ...
2
votes
1answer
569 views

Magnetic field of uniformly charged rotating hollow sphere

I want to compute the magnetic field due to a homogeneously charged, rotating sphere with radius $R$, angular velocity $\vec{\omega} = \omega\hat{z}$ and total charge $Q$. I want to use Biot-Savart ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Angular momenta of photon

$A^\mu$ can have multipole expansions in classical electrodynamics. This gives rise to dipole photon, quadrupole photon etc. For dipole photon $j=1$ (In electrodynamics books they write it as $l=1$). ...
2
votes
5answers
231 views

Is the canonical momentum conserved when a particle moves in magnetic field?

Here is a question about the canonical momentum that I had asked some days ago, but I still have one point that I am not understand. Considering a particle moves in a magnetic field with charge $q$ ...
2
votes
3answers
164 views

Why do surfaces act like barriers for electrons?

Say you have a conductor, filled with free electrons. The nuclei have a weak pull on the valence electrons so they are moving around in the conductor. But the electrons don't leave the solid. If you ...
2
votes
1answer
199 views

Why is there no (time derivative of charge density) in the $B$ field in Jefimenko's equations?

I was going through Griffiths chapter on potentials and fields just to brush up on a few old things. He gets to Jefimenko's equations by this general path: Maxwell's equations Introduce scalar and ...
2
votes
1answer
187 views

electric field of unpolarized light after reflect?

Reflection and transmission (Fresnel equation) of polarized light are treated in many optics or electromagnetism books. If $E_s$ and $E_p$ is incident electric field with s-polarization and ...
2
votes
2answers
582 views

Magnet and energy conservation

If we consider a steel ball falling under gravity in a cup (potential well) and being stopped at the bottom by an obstacle then energy conservation implies that the gravitational potential energy has ...
2
votes
1answer
201 views

Question on 1st order Lagrangian Derivation in Faddeev-Jackiw Formalism

I'm looking at this reference (sorry it's a postscript file, but I can't find a pdf version on the web. This paper describes a similar procedure). The topic is the Faddeev-Jackiw treatment of ...
2
votes
2answers
43 views

Reference on electrodynamics with tempered distributions

Back in my undergrad I had a course on classical electrodynamics where the fields had values in the space of tempered distributions. In this way one could correctly treat self-interaction and ...