0
votes
1answer
33 views

Field and Charge densities in two dimensional corners and along edges

In jackson's book, we can derive the equation as following. $\sigma(\rho)=\epsilon_{0}E_{\phi}(\rho, 0)\approx-\frac{\epsilon\pi a_{1}}{\beta}\rho^{(\pi/\beta)-1}---(2.75)$ My question is there are ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Deriving Heaviside-Feynman formula for the electric field of an arbitrarily moving charge from Lienard-Wiechert potential

I've been trying to derive this (which Feynman warns takes a lot of work) for a couple of days now, without success. My current best derivation which however doesn't give the right answer is: First, ...
7
votes
2answers
460 views

Why are EM waves transverse?

I was reading Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics, specifically the section on plane waves. I can see that if we want a transverse wave traveling in the $z$ direction that we are only going to ...
2
votes
0answers
31 views

Induced emf in a circular conducting wheel

Consider a conducting wheel with $N \in \mathbb{N}$ spokes which is completely in a homogenous magnetic field $\vec{B}$ perpendicular to the wheel plane. ...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

Tensor notation

I'm trying to understand the Maxwell Stress tensor notation. I'm given that each element in the tensor is given by ...
2
votes
2answers
124 views

Textbook on classical E&M in curved spacetime

Can anyone recommend a good reference for classical electrodynamics that goes over electrodynamics in curved spacetime that doesn't assume much knowledge of GR -- that is it builds up the tensor ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Demagnetisation by throwing a magnet

I tried to answer this question in a book about electrodynamics: How to demagnetise a permanent magnet, ie. described by $ D_T$ change into described by (0,0) I figured out about heating it up ...
4
votes
2answers
130 views

Instantaneous Coulomb interaction in QED

It seems I am stuck with a (at a first sight) trivial problem. It's from the "Quarks and Leptons" (Halzen, Martin) book page $141$, where one considers the following integral: $$\tag{1} T_{fi} = ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Relating Quantum Mechanics to Classic Electromagnetism [duplicate]

I've been directed to a few articles, and I am sure there is a related post, but can someone explain the procedure by which we can view classic electromagnetism through quantum mechanics? Indeed we ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

My model of Conductors in “static” condition - Please analyze

My textbook presents an idealization of a conductor as made up of infinitesimal units of charge and derives results. I was not convinced, so I started thinking of how electric fields are in real ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Poynting Vector Volume Integral Inside a Cavity

Given an electromagnetic wave in resonance mode in a vacuum cavity inside a perfect conductor, on the boundary, the parallel component of $E$ field vanishes, and the perpendicular of component of $B$ ...
1
vote
1answer
155 views

Total Momentum From a Standing Electromagnetic Wave

How does one show the momentum imparted to a perfect conducting resonance cavity (boundary) of any shape by a classical standing electromagnetic wave inside is zero? It should be by conservation of ...
3
votes
2answers
91 views

Utility of gauge four-potential $A_{\mu}$ (as opposed to electric and magnetic fields ${\bf E}$ and ${\bf B}$) in E&M?

The action for an electromagnetic field with source charges is given by $$S= \int \left\{ \frac{1}{4\mu_0}F^{\mu\nu}F_{\mu\nu} - J^\mu A_\mu \right\}dx$$ By setting $dS=0$ and taking the Lorenz ...
3
votes
2answers
70 views

Showing that Coloumb and Lorentz Gauges are indeed valid Gauge Transformations?

I'm working my way through Griffith's "Introduction to Electrodynamics". In Ch. 10, gauge transformations are introduced. The author shows that, given any magnetic potential $\textbf{A}_0$ and ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views
1
vote
2answers
100 views

Velocity of a Charged particle in a magnetic field according to Biot-Savart Law

According to Biot-Savart Law, if there is a charged particle in motion, there will be a magnetic field. My question is whether the counterpart of this law also holds true, i.e. if there is a magnetic ...
2
votes
4answers
241 views

Why ONLY Maxwell's equations are the basic equations of electromagnetism?

In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know: is this(to assume that there is no requirement of any other ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Determine stationary angular velocity of wheel with circuit in magnetic field

I have a wheel (free to spin around the $z-$axis) with four spokes that is connected by sliding contacts to a circuit with $U_0 = 0,72V$. Also, there is a B-Field parallel to the $z-$axis For the ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Why can we allow the speed of light being infinite in case of Surface Plasmons?

I have a problem with understanding of these sentences: We have indicated in the opening paragraph of the Introduction that surface plasmon polaritons are solutions of Maxwell’s equations in ...
4
votes
2answers
93 views

What is the difference between surface plasmon and surface plasmon polariton?

I'm trying to understand this reading article linked below and I still don't know how to explain this simply, without need to derive everything mathematically. Can someone just write here how do SP's ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

Ion Optics: Electric and Magnetic field. A comparison with Light Optics

When we compare ion optics with light optics, normally we consider electric field. For example Snell's law. $n_1\sin\theta_1$=$n_2\sin\theta_2$. When an electron move from one electric potential to ...
-2
votes
1answer
139 views

Poynting's theorem and escaping particles

I've edited my original question into horrible monstrosity (I apologize to all who spent their time on it). Here is rephrased version which hopefully will be clear. Lets have following model ...
8
votes
2answers
139 views

Counting the number of propagating degrees of freedom in Lorenz Gauge Electrodynamics

How do I definitively show that there are only two propagating degrees of freedom in the Lorenz Gauge $\partial_\mu A^\mu=0$ in classical electrodynamics. I need an clear argument that involves the ...
9
votes
1answer
366 views

Recovering all of Maxwell's equations from the variational principle

Whether you can get the first couple of Maxwell equations from a variational principle? In the second volume of the Landau theoretical physics said that it is impossible.
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Electromagnetic waves and group velocity

I have three questions about electromagnetic waves and was wondering whether anybody here could comment on these things: Wikipedia says that there are no longitudinal EM waves, although TM and TE ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

What is the mechanism for the production of the electromagnetic radiations due to accelerated charge particles?

I have recently read in Griffiths that when a charge particle get accelerated the electromagnetic field associated with it get " ditatched " from it and this detatched electromagnetic field is what we ...
0
votes
2answers
130 views

Prerequisites for Griffiths electrodynamics [duplicate]

I want to start reading Griffiths electrodynamics during my holidays. But I am not sure of the math I need to know to start reading and understand the text thoroughly. So any advice would be ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Online course on theoretical electrodynamics [duplicate]

I'm looking for good online course for an introduction into theoretical electrodynamics. However, it seems that the MIT opencourseware only contains partial lectures for this topic. Has anyone got a ...
1
vote
3answers
156 views

How the electric field or magnetic field itself contain momentum?

I have recently come to know that the electric and magnetic field contain both the translational and angular momenta in it given by some particular formulas at any given instant of the space....But I ...
5
votes
1answer
227 views

Maxwell's Stress Tensor

What really is the Maxwell Stress Tensor? I understand that it's derived from $$\mathbf {F} = \int _V ( \mathbf E + \mathbf v \times \mathbf B )\rho \ d \tau$$ Griffiths describes this as "total EM ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

calculating electrodynamic momentum of a dumbbell (consisting of two point charges) in longitudinal motion

I'm working through a paper on momentum in electrodynamics that requires the integration below and would greatly appreciate any help. I'm pretty sure it evaluates to $2/d$ but I can't quite figure ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

Connection between $\textbf E$ and $\textbf D$ can be non-local ? - Electrodynamics

In J.D. Jackson's first chapter, he says the proper equation connecting $\textbf E$ and $\textbf D$ $$ D_\alpha = \sum_\beta \int d^3x'\int dt' \epsilon_{\alpha\beta}(\textbf x',t')E_\beta(\textbf x ...
3
votes
1answer
85 views

Current, Current density

edit: Hi I'm trying to find the magnetic field generated by a time dependent oscillating current in the quasistatic case ($|z|,r <<c\omega$) where r is the perpendicular distance from the ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

time dependent current/ magnetic field

Is there a general way to calculate the magnetic field for a time dependent current of a long thing wire? For ex: If the current is $$ I(t)=I\sin wt, $$ is there a general method to use in order to ...
1
vote
2answers
199 views

Grounded conducting sphere inside uniform electric field

The problem of a grounded conducting sphere inside a uniform $E$ field in the $z$ direction can be solved by imagining the field be produced by a pair of charges $Q$ and $-Q$ put on the $z$ axis, ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Greens reciprocity theorem

The Greens reciprocity theorem is usually proved by using the Greens second identity. Why don't we prove it in the following "direct" way, which sounds more intuitive: $$\int_{\text{all ...
3
votes
0answers
90 views

Vector potential and gauge in electromagnetism

In a paper by Zimmerman [JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS 114, 044907 (2013)], it is stated that the Lorenz gauge in electromagnetism is the only gauge with real physical meaning. How do I reconcile this ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

Canonical Stress Tensor for the Free Electromagnetic Field

I have the followwing Lagrangian for the free electromagnetic field, $$\mathcal{L} = -\frac{1}{4} F^{\mu \nu}F_{\mu \nu},$$ and the canonical stress tensor is, $$T^{\alpha \beta}=\frac{\partial ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Do plasmons depend on the ambient EM field?

Imagine a situation: There's an illuminated metal slab in vacuum. Normally, there are some plasmons created running all over the slab. What would happen if we had turned a giant magnet near the slab? ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Earnshaw's Theorem for ferromagnets

Why is Earnshaw's Theorem inapplicable for moving ferromagnets? Can I get a mathematical classical proof for this?
12
votes
1answer
418 views

Physical Interpretation of EM Field Lagrangian

Using differential forms and their picture interpretations, I wonder if it's possible to give a nice geometric & physical motivation for the form of the Electromagnetic Lagrangian density? The ...
3
votes
2answers
134 views

When to use which representation for an electric field

In class we covered three types of possibilities to evaluate the electric field for static problems. Unfortunately, most physics textbooks cover these ways without addressing the question of ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

Inductor's energy

I have some knowledge about LC circuits, like I know Maxwell's equations, the differential equations of circuit oscillator and so on. I am armed with equations to solve physical problems involving ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

Step in a proof that $\textrm{div} \ \mathbf{B} = 0$ from Biot-Savart's law

Notation: The magnetic field $\mathbf{B}$ generated by a point charge $e$ moving with velocity $\mathbf{v}$ is given by Biot-Savart's law $$\mathbf{B} = \frac{\mu_0 e\ \mathbf{v} \wedge ...
1
vote
3answers
197 views

Integration constants in Maxwell's equations (ambiguousness?)

In classical electrodynamics, if the electric field (or magnetic field, either of the two) is fully known (for simplicity: in a vacuum with $\rho = 0, \vec{j} = 0$), is it possible to unambiguously ...
2
votes
9answers
810 views

Metallic and glass sphere of same size released at a height

This question was in my exam today : A metallic and glass sphere of same size were dropped at same height. Which sphere would hit the ground first and why? I have thought about several things and ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How does displacement current come about? [duplicate]

I know that displacement current is due to time-varying electric field and its not an electric current. But then, is it charge that is actually being displaced?
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Far Field Diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Does the 1-D poisson's equation have monotonic potentials if $\rho=\rho(\phi(z))$?

I am solving the 1-D poisson equation: $$\frac{d^2 \phi}{dz^2}=-4\pi\rho(\phi)$$ with the additional requirement that $\rho(\phi(z=0))=0$. If I start by multiplying each side by $\frac{d\phi}{d z}$ ...
3
votes
2answers
132 views

Can the $\vec H$-field have non-zero divergence? Does an $\vec H$-field monopole exist?

We know that, $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec B=0$ but $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec H\neq 0$, if $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec M \neq 0$. Does it mean that, in those cases $\vec H$-field has poles although $\vec ...