0
votes
1answer
57 views
1
vote
2answers
81 views

Velocity of a Charged particle in a magnetic field according to Biot-Savart Law

According to Biot-Savart Law, if there is a charged particle in motion, there will be a magnetic field. My question is whether the counterpart of this law also holds true, i.e. if there is a magnetic ...
2
votes
4answers
212 views

Why ONLY Maxwell's equations are the basic equations of electromagnetism?

In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know: is this(to assume that there is no requirement of any other ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Determine stationary angular velocity of wheel with circuit in magnetic field

I have a wheel (free to spin around the $z-$axis) with four spokes that is connected by sliding contacts to a circuit with $U_0 = 0,72V$. Also, there is a B-Field parallel to the $z-$axis For the ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Why can we allow the speed of light being infinite in case of Surface Plasmons?

I have a problem with understanding of these sentences: We have indicated in the opening paragraph of the Introduction that surface plasmon polaritons are solutions of Maxwell’s equations in ...
4
votes
2answers
50 views

What is the difference between surface plasmon and surface plasmon polariton?

I'm trying to understand this reading article linked below and I still don't know how to explain this simply, without need to derive everything mathematically. Can someone just write here how do SP's ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Ion Optics: Electric and Magnetic field. A comparison with Light Optics

When we compare ion optics with light optics, normally we consider electric field. For example Snell's law. $n_1\sin\theta_1$=$n_2\sin\theta_2$. When an electron move from one electric potential to ...
-2
votes
1answer
134 views

Poynting's theorem and escaping particles

I've edited my original question into horrible monstrosity (I apologize to all who spent their time on it). Here is rephrased version which hopefully will be clear. Lets have following model ...
8
votes
2answers
112 views

Counting the number of propagating degrees of freedom in Lorenz Gauge Electrodynamics

How do I definitively show that there are only two propagating degrees of freedom in the Lorenz Gauge $\partial_\mu A^\mu=0$ in classical electrodynamics. I need an clear argument that involves the ...
6
votes
1answer
303 views

Recovering all of Maxwell's equations from the variational principle

Whether you can get the first couple of Maxwell equations from a variational principle? In the second volume of the Landau theoretical physics said that it is impossible.
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Electromagnetic waves and group velocity

I have three questions about electromagnetic waves and was wondering whether anybody here could comment on these things: Wikipedia says that there are no longitudinal EM waves, although TM and TE ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What is the mechanism for the production of the electromagnetic radiations due to accelerated charge particles?

I have recently read in Griffiths that when a charge particle get accelerated the electromagnetic field associated with it get " ditatched " from it and this detatched electromagnetic field is what we ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

Prerequisites for Griffiths electrodynamics [duplicate]

I want to start reading Griffiths electrodynamics during my holidays. But I am not sure of the math I need to know to start reading and understand the text thoroughly. So any advice would be ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Online course on theoretical electrodynamics [duplicate]

I'm looking for good online course for an introduction into theoretical electrodynamics. However, it seems that the MIT opencourseware only contains partial lectures for this topic. Has anyone got a ...
1
vote
3answers
110 views

How the electric field or magnetic field itself contain momentum?

I have recently come to know that the electric and magnetic field contain both the translational and angular momenta in it given by some particular formulas at any given instant of the space....But I ...
3
votes
1answer
85 views

Maxwell's Stress Tensor

What really is the Maxwell Stress Tensor? I understand that it's derived from $$\mathbf {F} = \int _V ( \mathbf E + \mathbf v \times \mathbf B )\rho \ d \tau$$ Griffiths describes this as "total EM ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

calculating electrodynamic momentum of a dumbbell (consisting of two point charges) in longitudinal motion

I'm working through a paper on momentum in electrodynamics that requires the integration below and would greatly appreciate any help. I'm pretty sure it evaluates to $2/d$ but I can't quite figure ...
1
vote
2answers
63 views

Connection between $\textbf E$ and $\textbf D$ can be non-local ? - Electrodynamics

In J.D. Jackson's first chapter, he says the proper equation connecting $\textbf E$ and $\textbf D$ $$ D_\alpha = \sum_\beta \int d^3x'\int dt' \epsilon_{\alpha\beta}(\textbf x',t')E_\beta(\textbf x ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

Current, Current density

edit: Hi I'm trying to find the magnetic field generated by a time dependent oscillating current in the quasistatic case ($|z|,r <<c\omega$) where r is the perpendicular distance from the ...
1
vote
2answers
54 views

time dependent current/ magnetic field

Is there a general way to calculate the magnetic field for a time dependent current of a long thing wire? For ex: If the current is $$ I(t)=I\sin wt, $$ is there a general method to use in order to ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Grounded conducting sphere inside uniform electric field

The problem of a grounded conducting sphere inside a uniform $E$ field in the $z$ direction can be solved by imagining the field be produced by a pair of charges $Q$ and $-Q$ put on the $z$ axis, ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Greens reciprocity theorem

The Greens reciprocity theorem is usually proved by using the Greens second identity. Why don't we prove it in the following "direct" way, which sounds more intuitive: $$\int_{\text{all ...
3
votes
0answers
73 views

Vector potential and gauge in electromagnetism

In a paper by Zimmerman [JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS 114, 044907 (2013)], it is stated that the Lorenz gauge in electromagnetism is the only gauge with real physical meaning. How do I reconcile this ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Canonical Stress Tensor for the Free Electromagnetic Field

I have the followwing Lagrangian for the free electromagnetic field, $$\mathcal{L} = -\frac{1}{4} F^{\mu \nu}F_{\mu \nu},$$ and the canonical stress tensor is, $$T^{\alpha \beta}=\frac{\partial ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Do plasmons depend on the ambient EM field?

Imagine a situation: There's an illuminated metal slab in vacuum. Normally, there are some plasmons created running all over the slab. What would happen if we had turned a giant magnet near the slab? ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Earnshaw's Theorem for ferromagnets

Why is Earnshaw's Theorem inapplicable for moving ferromagnets? Can I get a mathematical classical proof for this?
11
votes
1answer
378 views

Physical Interpretation of EM Field Lagrangian

Using differential forms and their picture interpretations, I wonder if it's possible to give a nice geometric & physical motivation for the form of the Electromagnetic Lagrangian density? The ...
3
votes
2answers
123 views

When to use which representation for an electric field

In class we covered three types of possibilities to evaluate the electric field for static problems. Unfortunately, most physics textbooks cover these ways without addressing the question of ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Inductor's energy

I have some knowledge about LC circuits, like I know Maxwell's equations, the differential equations of circuit oscillator and so on. I am armed with equations to solve physical problems involving ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Step in a proof that $\textrm{div} \ \mathbf{B} = 0$ from Biot-Savart's law

Notation: The magnetic field $\mathbf{B}$ generated by a point charge $e$ moving with velocity $\mathbf{v}$ is given by Biot-Savart's law $$\mathbf{B} = \frac{\mu_0 e\ \mathbf{v} \wedge ...
1
vote
3answers
175 views

Integration constants in Maxwell's equations (ambiguousness?)

In classical electrodynamics, if the electric field (or magnetic field, either of the two) is fully known (for simplicity: in a vacuum with $\rho = 0, \vec{j} = 0$), is it possible to unambiguously ...
2
votes
9answers
672 views

Metallic and glass sphere of same size released at a height

This question was in my exam today : A metallic and glass sphere of same size were dropped at same height. Which sphere would hit the ground first and why? I have thought about several things and ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How does displacement current come about? [duplicate]

I know that displacement current is due to time-varying electric field and its not an electric current. But then, is it charge that is actually being displaced?
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Far Field Diffraction of EM waves: what does the zero frequency signify?

If you have a system of independently radiating electrons/point-charges, the far field distribution of the EM waves can be approximated by the fraunhoffer diffraction integral, or simply by the ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Does the 1-D poisson's equation have monotonic potentials if $\rho=\rho(\phi(z))$?

I am solving the 1-D poisson equation: $$\frac{d^2 \phi}{dz^2}=-4\pi\rho(\phi)$$ with the additional requirement that $\rho(\phi(z=0))=0$. If I start by multiplying each side by $\frac{d\phi}{d z}$ ...
3
votes
2answers
112 views

Can the $\vec H$-field have non-zero divergence? Does an $\vec H$-field monopole exist?

We know that, $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec B=0$ but $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec H\neq 0$, if $\vec \nabla \cdot \vec M \neq 0$. Does it mean that, in those cases $\vec H$-field has poles although $\vec ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

electromagnetic induction. Does charge matter?

Just wondering. I know a negative electric charge moving though a coil will induce a voltage in the coil. My question is, would a positive charge, say an ion beam, moving though a coil also induce a ...
10
votes
2answers
297 views

The problem of self-force on point charges

Allow me to preface this by stating that I am a high school student interested in physics and self-studying using a variety of resources, both on- and off-line, primarily GSU's HyperPhysics website, ...
1
vote
1answer
116 views

The workings of the Hall effect?

I want to ask about the workings of the Hall effect. Why do the electrons come to rest on the edge of the wire? The magnetic field pushes them up, and the electric field pushes them forward. Shouldn't ...
2
votes
4answers
183 views

Is the canonical momentum conserved when a particle moves in magnetic field?

Here is a question about the canonical momentum that I had asked some days ago, but I still have one point that I am not understand. Considering a particle moves in a magnetic field with charge $q$ ...
1
vote
1answer
163 views

Frequency of rotating coil

Given a coil initially in the x-y plane, rotating at angular frequency $ \omega $ about the x-axis in a magnetic field in the z-direction. This uniform time varying magnetic field is given by $B_z ...
1
vote
2answers
114 views

A question about canonical momentum and arbitrariness for potential in magnetism

The following question confuses me: There exists magnetic field $B_z =- \beta x$ where $x > 0$, and a particle is incident from origin point $(0,0)$ with pisitive charge $q$, mass $m$, and ...
2
votes
3answers
147 views

Why do surfaces act like barriers for electrons?

Say you have a conductor, filled with free electrons. The nuclei have a weak pull on the valence electrons so they are moving around in the conductor. But the electrons don't leave the solid. If you ...
0
votes
0answers
119 views

Field inside a conductor?

If the above image is a cross section of a conductor, the field at the point shown is not zero. So the field inside a conductor is not zero at all points. You could argue that the electrons would ...
3
votes
1answer
127 views

Is Newton's third compatible with retarded Lorentz force?

In Griffiths Introduction to electrodynamics it is said that Newton's third law is not valid in electrodynamics, but, in the example given, the it does not consider the retarded values for the fields ...
1
vote
0answers
129 views

Complex polarizability of a dielectric sphere in a homohenious electric field

It is well known that complex polarizability of uniform dielectric sphere with radius $r$ and complex permittivity $\hat\epsilon_{in}(\omega)$ placed in a medium with complex permittivity ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Objects made up of electrons?

Say you have a neutral rod, and you bring a positively charged rod beside it (call the side the charged rod is brought near side A and the other side side B). The electrons from the side B will start ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Is charge 'localization' implicit in the idea of current?

If it was possible for charge to assume arbitrary densities, like we often see electrostatic exercises, and one could spread charge density uniformly over a ring, then how one would, theoretically, ...
3
votes
1answer
168 views

Missing terms in Hamiltonian after Legendre transformation of Lagrangian

Short question Given any Lagrangian density of fields one could possibly conceive, is it the case that after one has performed a Legendre transformation, if the Hamiltonian is then expressed in terms ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Is it physically realistic to have an electric field and polarisation density but no displacement field?

Given a Lagrangian density that describes a classical dielectric in interaction with the EM field, I found the Euler-Lagrange equations, and in the case of the electric field, worked through to find ...