A fundamental property of matter which causes it to experience electromagnetic forces.

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186 views

Facts About Quarks Electric Charge [duplicate]

Quarks have the unusual characteristic of having a fractional electric charge. here there is a new model that suggests maybe an up Quark has no electric charge and infact down Quark has electric ...
7
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119 views

How can I find the position of an image charge when the boundary is parabolic or hyperbolic?

If the position of some charge Q is known, the boundary condition is u=0 on some parabolic surface, and we know the image charge has its electric volume of Q', then how can I determine the position of ...
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1answer
190 views

Find the dielectric constant of the medium?

Two point charges a distance $d$ apart in free space exert a force of $1.4\times10^{-4}N$. When the free space is replaced by a homogeneous dielectric medium, the force becomes $0.9\times10^{-4}N$. ...
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131 views

Total positive charge in the Universe

In their last homework, some of my students miscalculated a charge to be $10^{20}$ C over a squared meter and I was wondering if there was as much positive charges in the entire Universe. It would do ...
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3answers
167 views

Is electron velocity at induction higher than in a wire?

When looking to the electrostatic induction on a microscopic level, do the electrons really move with high velocities or they move like when a current passes through the wire (slowly).
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1answer
493 views

Does the electric field inside a sphere change if point charge isn't in center?

As i understood , if you have a point charge in the center of a hollow conducting sphere then the electric field inside it, is zero because the charge distribution is spherically symmetric. But ...
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1answer
419 views

Parallel capacitors without battery. Does charge flowing after a dielectric input?

If I charge two capacitors which are connected parallel $[$the minus (-) of the one opposite to the minus (-) of the other and the plus(+) of the one opposite to the plus (+) of the other.$]$, will I ...
2
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1answer
321 views

Two capacitors sharing charge

My two capacitors:                               I have these two capacitors ($C_1 = 3\mu F, C_2 = 4\mu F$) both initially under 19 volts. Then, I added a dielectric with $k=4$ at $C_1$ and entire ...
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488 views

What's the electric field with a point charge not in the center of the sphere? [closed]

That's a hollow conducting sphere link My charge is at P (10uC). R = 0.15m. PS = 0.05m. DS = 0.35m. What's the electric field at point D?
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45 views

Charge residing on an overpolished surface

I had very well read that when charge is stored on a rough surface, the leakage is very high from the pointed tips of such surfaces, by a phenomenon called action of points. But now, I've come to know ...
0
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1answer
359 views

Why doesn't a gaussian surface pass through discrete charges?

I have read that Gaussian surface cannot pass through discrete charges. Why is it so? I have even seen in application of Gauss' Law when we imagine a Gaussian Surface passing through a charge ...
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2answers
348 views

Electrostatic induction

Is this a correct definition of electrostatic induction, The production of opposite charges on a neutral body when a charged body is brought near to it? I think it's not the production but ...
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1answer
296 views

Electric field of a negative charge

Displacing something against the gravitational field, gains it potential energy. Moving something against the nature requires work. If the electric field of a negative source charge 'Q' points inward, ...
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2answers
3k views

Electric field of a negative charge

How was it discovered that the electric field of a negative charge points towards the charge itself? Is it true? (Courtesy of wikipedia)
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1answer
595 views

Origin of electric charge

Baryons have charges that are the result of a polynomial calculation of their building blocks (quarks)'s fractional charges. But what gives these quarks electric charges? What interactions do they ...
2
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1answer
196 views

Point charge 4-current derivation

How do I derive that the 4-current of a point charge is $$j^{\mu}(x)=ec\int_{-\infty}^{+\infty}\dot{z}^{\mu}(s)\delta(x-z(s))ds$$ where $\dot{z}^{\mu}(s)$ is the 4-velocity of the charge and $s$ is ...
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1answer
72 views

Electrostatic potential and charge

Say we have a balloon, negatively charged, the voltage on it is 500 V. Can I measure the charge on it or in other words, the number of excess electrons?
0
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1answer
75 views

Electric charge and the distance

The strength of an electric field is: $E = 200\ \mathrm{N/C}$ The potential (of the test charge) is: $V = 600\ \mathrm{V}$ $\epsilon_r=1$ I need to calculate the distance between this point and the ...
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1answer
892 views

How to positively charge an object with a power source? [duplicate]

How do you positively charge something consistently? By what mechanism could this be achieved?
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1answer
1k views

Electron volt and Voltage

Voltage is the work done per unit charge. Given by: V = W/q Electron volt is the maximum kinetic energy gained by the electron in falling through a potential difference of 1 volt. Given by: K.E ...
3
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1answer
894 views

What do physical properties of materials trigger the capacitive touch screen?

I have watched some youtube videos about capacitive touch screen http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHzaVzYEZbw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmCE18RMEeQ The videos show that a conductor(finger), in ...
2
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2answers
131 views

Empirical bound on sum of electron and proton charge

Followup to "Why do electron and proton have the same but opposite electric charge?". It is argued that even a tiny residual charge would result in huge amounts of electricity in bulk matter, ...
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3answers
330 views

Explanation on the resulting forces of two positive point charges

Why will the resulting force lines of two positive point charges be like this: I would expect this:
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4answers
975 views

How does positive charge spread out in conductors?

I know that when there are excess positive charges in a conductor, for example, a metal sphere, the positive charges will spread out over its surface. However, I am confused about how this excess ...
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2answers
94 views

If a particle is a point of high intensity in a quantum field, how can it have charge?

The charge of a fundamental particle is a mysterious but obvious and well-known property of every non-neutral particle. I can understand how, if a particle is an object, or thing, for want of a ...
3
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3answers
825 views

How is possible for current to flow so fast when charge flows so slow?

How is possible for current to flow so fast when charge flows so slow? We know electrons travel very slowly while charge travels at ~the speed of light.
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3answers
770 views

Why can we use Gauss' law to compute electric field?

For simplicity I'm considering only the sphere case. In the Gauss' Law formulation we have some field $E$ introduced by charges $Q$ inside some sphere, then we compute flux and integrate, and we get ...
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What happens to capacitor’s charge when the plates are moved further apart?

In my physics textbook there is an example of using capacitor switches in computer keyboard: Pressing the key pushes two capacitor plates closer together, increasing their capacitance. A larger ...
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1answer
68 views

Permanently charging a sphere by induction using a high voltage

I want to charge a sphere using a van de graff generator , it would sound easy , but using a 1 MV or a 900 KV is really hard, it is enough to break like 1 meter of air so whenever i try to ground the ...
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2answers
103 views

Was the fractional model of quarks electric charge found before discovery of the $\Delta^{++}$?

From Wikipedia: Existence of the $\Delta^{++}$ , with its unusual +2 electric charge, was a crucial clue in the development of the quark model. the fractional model of Quarks electric charge was ...
2
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2answers
90 views

Ashcroft Mermin Eq. 17.47ff

In "Solid State Physics" by said authors, Eq. 17.46 is $$ \rho^{ind}(\textbf{r}) = - e[n_0(\mu + e\phi(\textbf{r})) - n_0(\mu)]$$ and then the authors write In the present case we assume that ...
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1answer
124 views

Charged plane in an electric field acceleration

A perpendicular plane to an electric field's lines of force has more electric flux than a plane that is in parallel with the lines of force, right? Does this mean that a charged plate would ...
2
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1answer
149 views

Electrostatic charge leakage

What are the ways electrostatic charged objects leak charge in humid conditions? Can airborne particles pick up charge by contact, then be repelled hence removing charge? If so would it be a ...
0
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1answer
327 views

Electric Fields

The problem I am working on is, "In the figure below, determine the point (other than infinity) at which the electric field is zero. (Let $q_1 = -2.45\ \mu C$ and $q_2 = 6.5\ \mu C$) Here is a little ...
3
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1answer
481 views

Electric Field due to a charged sphere

Suppose we have a spherical surface with a surface charge density varying as $cos(\theta)$. Apparently one can find the electric field both outside and inside such a spherical surface by superposing ...
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1answer
251 views

Conservation of Energy as Applied to Point Charges

The following question appears to be extremely straight forward, but I can't seem to be able to obtain the correct answer. The question is: A charge Q1 = 1.3uC is at rest and is located 2.3 cm ...
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2answers
117 views

Is there a limit to the charge of a body?

Can a body be limitlessly charged? Suppose a sphere of radius $R$. Can it be charged limitlessly?
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1answer
38 views

Are the ions in a fluorescent lamps concentrated near the electrodes?

Are the ions in a fluorescent lamps concentrated near the electrodes , and just the electrons move to the other electrode or the positive mercury ions move too?
5
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1answer
3k views

What defines the maximum charge a capacitor can store?

The formula for a capacitor discharging is $Q=Q_0e^{-\frac{t}{RC}}$ Where $Q_0$ is the maximum charge. But what property defines the maximum charge a capacitor can store? If it depends on ...
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1answer
619 views

( Legendre Generating Function) Off axis Electric Potential from an insulated disk

An insulated disk, uniform surface charge density $\sigma$, of radius $R$ is laid on the $x,y$ plane. Deduce the electric potential $V(z)$ along the z-axis. Next consider an off axis point $p'$, ...
6
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1answer
648 views

Noether theorem and classical proof of electric charge conservation

How to prove conservation of electric charge using Noether's theorem according to classical (non-quantum) mechanics? I know the proof based on using Klein–Gordon field, but that derivation use ...
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3answers
1k views

What does a subatomic charge actually mean?

I was recently reading a popular science book called The Canon - The Beautiful Basics of Science by Natalie Angier, and it talks about subatomic particles like protons, neutrons and electrons in ...
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2answers
357 views

Change in intensity of electric field with constant velocity

Consider a +Q charged particle is travelling towards another test charge +Q. Now what would be the difference in electric field experienced by the test charge(avoid the gradual decrease in distance ...
0
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1answer
118 views

Charging using a CRT TV set

I was doing an experiment with my CRT TV where I put aluminum foil on the screen wire it to a can and open the TV and a ring between 2 can will swing if I ground the other can. ...
9
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0answers
156 views

Is the Hawking radiation of a charged black hole thermal?

Suppose you have a Schwarzschild black hole of mass $M$ and angular parameter $a = 0$ (no rotation). Question: is it possible to throw a charge $Q$ at a faster rate than it will be re-radiated? Will ...
3
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1answer
228 views

Semiconductor problem: how much Boron is required to establish a certain amount of charge carrier density

The problem description is as follows: Boron is used to dope 1 kg of germanium (Ge). How much boron (B) is required to establish a charge carrier density of 3.091 x 10^17 / cm^3. One mole of ...
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1answer
297 views

Charge on capacitor plates in series combination?

Suppose 2 capacitors are connected in series, the plates connected to the battery terminals receive charges $+q$ and $-q$, and the isolated plates in the combination receive equal and opposite charges ...
0
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1answer
195 views

About voltage and charge of van de graff generator

I have read that in case of Van de graff generator $V=kQ/r$ where $r$ is radius of the sphere. If that's the case, does the same voltage results in bigger charges in bigger radii?
3
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2answers
401 views

Conservation of Charge and Method of Images

Consider the typical problem, "You have a conducting sphere of charge $Q$ and a point charge q a certain distance away, what is the force on the point charge?". The solution is a simple application of ...
2
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3answers
1k views

Delta Dirac Charge Density question

I have to write an expression for the charge density $\rho(\vec{r})$ of a point charge $q$ at $\vec{r}^{\prime}$, ensuring that the volume integral equals $q$. The only place any charge exists is at ...