A fundamental property of matter which causes it to experience electromagnetic forces.

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Show that the radius of the equipotential surface between +3C and -1C charges is 3.8m [on hold]

This question concerns two point charges of values +3$C$ and −1$C$. The two charges are fixed in position with a separation of exactly 1 metre. Consider the positive charge to be placed at the origin ...
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2answers
38 views

Why are the charge operator $Q$ and the baryon number operator $B$ unbounded?

A friend recommended me to read PCT, Spin and Statistics, and All That written by R. F. Streater and A. S. Wightman. In page 5 to 6, here's what the authors of this book have to say: [...] In ...
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0answers
20 views

Inquisitive please help me!! Finding charge on plastic spheres [on hold]

A piece of wool is used to charge two plastic spheres. When the spheres are held 300mm apart, they repel each other with 9.00N of force. If the wool ends up with a surplus positive charge of 29.5μC , ...
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1answer
60 views

Is it possible to give photons an electric charge?

I know that photons have no electric charge and that they are stable, but is it possible to give them a positive or negative charge? If so how?
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1answer
45 views

Total Energy Stored in Seven Capacitors [on hold]

The capacitive network shown in the figure is assembled with initially uncharged capacitors. A potential difference, Vab = +100V, is applied across the network. The switch S in the network is kept ...
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1answer
69 views

How does a minority carrier diffuse?

I have gone through a lot of questions but none of them ask how do the minority carriers approach the depletion layer in the first place. When a p-n junction is formed, negative space charge ...
2
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1answer
62 views

Charge operator for Dirac spinor

In QED, the gauge transformation which acts upon a fermionic field $\psi$ is $$\psi'(x)= e^{i \alpha(x) Q}\psi(x)$$ where $Q$ is the charge operator. Most of the time it's just written as $$\psi'(x)= ...
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1answer
102 views

Upper limit to electric charge confinement?

The following questions are not intended for conventional capacitors (which stores excess charge on the outside surface), rather a type of hypothetical capacitor which is designed to confine charge by ...
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1answer
68 views

Opacity/Transparency of Conductive Meshes to Charged Particles (Electrons/Ions)

When using a conductive (metal) mesh, effectively a metallic woven fabric, in vacuum applications as a "grid" for charged particle optics, how does one calculate (or at least estimate) the opacity or ...
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0answers
52 views

Is the elementary charge really a constant of nature? - Accuracy of QED

There are a couple of natural constants; examples are Planck's constant or the Speed of light in vacuum. The elementary Charge is the coupling factor to all Kind of electromagnetic interactions; this ...
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1answer
47 views

What is an electric charge? [closed]

Can you explain to me what is an electric charge? In particular: Where is it? How does it look(in a figurative sense, I know that we can't see it)? What is inside the charge? I want to know ...
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3answers
419 views

Do objects have energy because of their charge?

My gut feeling tells me things should have energy because of their charge, like they have energy because of their mass. Is this possible? Has it been shown? If not then what is missing to make such ...
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1answer
79 views

Does charge of a metal charged by induction determine by which ends of the metal is grounded to?

Does charge of a metal charged by induction determine by which part of the metal is ground to? I draw a diagram to make it simple to understand: Right diagram: When ground is touched with the ...
3
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1answer
377 views

Semiconductor problem: how much Boron is required to establish a certain amount of charge carrier density

The problem description is as follows: Boron is used to dope 1 kg of germanium (Ge). How much boron (B) is required to establish a charge carrier density of 3.091 x 10^17 / cm^3. One mole of ...
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0answers
21 views

Why are trampolines more likely to give you a static shock when it is sunny?

It could just be in my head but I have noticed that I am more likely to get a static shock from my tramp when it is sunny than when it is not sunny. Is there a reason for this?
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2answers
25 views

Is the following thought experiment about two charges correct?

Let's say I put a charge at a point in space for a long enough time. During this time interval it has set up the electric field in the space. Then I put another charge in the space. Since the ...
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2answers
601 views

How can I split a resultant force into its $x$ and $y$ components?

Point charge 3.5μC is located at x = 0, y = 0.30 m, point charge -3.5μC is located at x = 0 y = -0.30 m. What are (a)the magnitude and (b)direction of the total electric force that these charges ...
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0answers
20 views

Does triboelectric effect causes building up charge only on the surface of the material or inside as well?

I am planning on building a Van De Graaff generator and what I plan to use as material for the rollers is PVC for bottom roller(or Teflon), nylon (pantyhose) or wool for the belt and metal (conductor) ...
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2answers
315 views

Effect of charges near a parallel plate capacitor

If I charge a parallel plate capacitor and I insert a charged body near one of the plates will there be any interactions like attraction or repulsion? What if I disconnect the battery?
3
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1answer
314 views

What proved Conventional sense wrong?

What fact proved for the first time that the conventional sense of current was wrong? And when it did happen? As a corollary of this question, why do we say that electrons have negative charge? Is it ...
3
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0answers
68 views

In string-net condensation, what does the quantized charge means? [closed]

The electrical charge is quantized strictly for elementary particles. What kind constraints does this fact applied to string-net theory? For the this question, I want to understand why electrical ...
2
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1answer
328 views

What determines how much electrical charge an object can hold?

What determines how much electrical charge an object can hold? Does increase voltage force more electrical charge to be store in an object (Van de Graaff generator), since electric field increase as ...
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1answer
21 views

Semiconductor intrinsic carrier concentration is given by ni=BT^(3/2)*exp(-E/2kT), how is this derived?

The glorious book Sedra/Smith Microelectronic Circuits states that for a semiconductor the intrinsic charge concentration is is given by: $$ n_i = BT^{3/2}e^{-E_g/2kT} $$ Where $n_i$ is the ...
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2answers
942 views

What types of materials can be electrically charged by rubbing?

What types of materials can be electrically charged by rubbing? Is there a certain type of materials in which static electricity can be produced by rubbing together two different materials?
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0answers
66 views

How the experimental charge $e=1.60217657 × 10^{-19} C$ has precisely this value?

The coupling constant that we measured in "arbitrarily" low energy is $e=1.60217657 × 10^{-19} C$. How this is presented in Renormalization Group flow in charge coupling space? Why the action of the ...
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2answers
616 views

How do I express the interaction energy between two charged spheres?

Consider two identical insulating spheres each with radius $R$ and uniform charge $Q$ through their volume. They are separated from their centers by a distance of $d>2R$. Here is my general ...
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1answer
247 views

Force due to combination of free space and dielectric

I will make a generalized form of my question. There are two point charges $q$, $x$ distance apart. And there is a dielectric slab of thickness $t$ and of dielectric constant $K$. Should the force ...
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3answers
9k views

Why is electric field zero inside a hollow metal sphere ?

The figure below shows a hollow metal sphere with a positive point charge $Q$ sitting outside it. What is the electric field at the center of sphere ? The answer is zero (look at here at the beginning ...
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2answers
35 views

Electrostatics Basic Question

Why ,if we increase the charge on a conductor its potential also increases? That is, Q directly proportional to V. Why ,if an insulated conductor is given some charge it acquires a certain ...
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1answer
19 views

What does “touching” mean in the context of charge by conduction in electrostatics?

So in our physics class today, we had a demonstration involving a charged rod and a neutral ball attached to a string (a physical pendulum). At first, when the rod was placed near the ball, the ball ...
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1answer
21 views

charge density is a constant or a scalar-value function of position?

Since it is "density", I suppose that such values as charge density of a volume region $\rho_v$, charge density of a line $\rho_L$, and charge density of a surface $\rho_S$ is a constant but I ...
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2answers
82 views

Can one proton attract two electrons?

Suppose that in an empty space there is only one proton. This proton would have created a field of positive charge which should attract possible negative electrons, so now we add two electrons on ...
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1answer
17 views

Repulsive force between same charged plates?

I understand that the attraction force between parallel plates of capacitor is the derivative of stored energy with respect to distance of the plates. But how could we find the repulsive force between ...
2
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2answers
141 views

Electrostatics - Inserting a brass plate between two charges

The question is: if I were to insert a brass plate between two charges, what will happen to the force between the charges? Would it increase, decrease or stay the same? Does the brass plate increase ...
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1answer
48 views

Why does Ampère's force only linearly depend on the distance between the two wires?

When we encountered Ampère's force law our professor stated: In the formula of the magnetic force you don't find $r^2$ as in the gravitational and the electric one because while those directly ...
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1answer
29 views

2D room with electron-point-charges (stability)

Is there a fast way to find out stable #"point charges" & constellation for this kind of Simulation. The 2D repeating itselve in each direction till infinity, so i've a kind of symetrie here. ...
2
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1answer
26 views

Is it possible for the phase of electric charge to change over large general relativistic distances?

Jackson provides examples of how magnetic charge and electric charge form together to create complex charge, \begin{align} \rho = \rho_e+i\rho_m \end{align} which gives rise to the complex faraday ...
2
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1answer
58 views

What does it signify that electrostatic mass cannot exist without inertial mass?

From Coulomb's law and Newton's second law we can state that if there is electrostatic mass (charge) at any point of space then there has to exist inertial mass also at that point of space. Otherwise, ...
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0answers
50 views

How to theoretically determine electric charges of $W^{\pm}$ bosons?

I just realised that I don't remember how to conclude theoretically that $W^{\pm}$ bosons have electric charges of $\pm 1$. After some searching I'm quite surprise that I couldn't find a satisfying ...
2
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2answers
56 views

Is charge 'localization' implicit in the idea of current?

If it was possible for charge to assume arbitrary densities, like we often see electrostatic exercises, and one could spread charge density uniformly over a ring, then how one would, theoretically, ...
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2answers
123 views

Charge vs Charge Density in classical electrodynamics

What is assumed to be a more fundamental physical quantity in classical electrodynamics. The charge density as a scalar field or the physical entity charge.
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2answers
876 views

How is bound charge and free charge possible?

I am studying Introduction to Electrodynamics by Griffiths and I came along a concept I cannot seem to understand properly. The concept of free charge AND bound charge. I do not understand how we can ...
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1answer
32 views

Question regarding 2 conducting spheres connected by a long fine line (electric potentional)

I'm having a bit of trouble understanding a pretty simple issue. Assuming I have 2 conducting spheres uniformly charged connected by a long fine line (as shows in the added photo) and im being asked ...
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0answers
29 views

Li-ion Battery charging

Why are constant current mode and constant voltage mode needed when charging Li-ion batteries? Why do we apply saturation charge even after the cell voltage reaches 4.2V? What exactly is 'I-sense' in ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Virtual Photon transmission speed of a Static Electric Field?

In the case of a non-accelerating point charge "A" of stable velocity, its static field is treated as though it is instantaneously present at a distance, i.e. a second point charge "B" will react to ...
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0answers
24 views

Why is there no charge in a capacitor connected to one battery pole? [duplicate]

Here is a very simple drawing of a battery pole and a capacitor plate connected by a wire (exaggerated in thickness). The question is, why is the capacitor not being charged? But as you will see ...
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0answers
35 views

Do charges attractions cause time dilation? [duplicate]

I was pondering whether charges will cause time dilatation? Let me explain more, well we know that gravity causes time-dilatation because of gravitational acceleration which is equal to: $$a = ...
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2answers
625 views

What is charge actually? How to define it? [closed]

Is charge of something for (e.g.) an electron related to electromagnetic space if it exists due to energy, due to which it may have mass? I don't know about quantum mechanics or advanced particle ...
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1answer
50 views

How to find whether the electric field between capacitor plates is above or below the electrical breakdown limit of the insulator between the plates?

Let's say the two plates of a capacitor have charges $q_1$ and $q_2$. The separation between these plates is $d$. I know that I can calculate the electric field by dividing the voltage that is applied ...
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1answer
35 views

Relativistic Induced Magnetic Field in particle's frame

Suppose there is a constant magnetic field: $\vec{\mathbf{B}} = B \hat{z}$. A charged particle orbits that magnetic field perpendicular to the magnetic field, and induces a magnetic field in the ...