A fundamental property of matter which causes it to experience electromagnetic forces.

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Charge of $W$-bosons in Feynman diagrams

When looking at Feynman diagrams of particle decays, how would I be able to find out the charges of the $W$-bosons involved in the decay?
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37 views

Is this diagram in my textbook not constructed to scale?

Or am I having an illusion. Clearly, the distance from 6v to 4v is not the same as 4v to 2v. I know it should be based on: $V = k\frac{q}{r}$.
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1answer
23 views

How does the size of conducting sphere affect the distribution of charge?

I am doing my homework. One question gives individual charges on two spheres. And asks what the resulting charge is on each after touching. But one thing interest me is that in the answer key, it's ...
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1answer
18 views

Why can't objects made of insulating material “store excess charges”?

This is quoted from my textbook. I saw plastic objects before being able to store excess charges. For example, if you rub paper against a plastic pole. Both will gain charges. But in lab, I never ...
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1answer
13 views

Would an electroscope work if it were not in a glass container?

I'm reading about the gold-leaf electroscope and all the sources I've read show that the gold leaves are placed in a glass container. Is there something special about the glass, or would any container ...
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1answer
81 views

Principle of superposition and QED

For finding a net force on a charge when it is in influence of many charges we simply do vectorical addition of all individual interaction of that charge with others. That's what is principle of ...
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1answer
51 views

What are the interpretations of ampere's circuital law for a single moving electron?

I understand from Ampere's circuital law that when a current passes though any open surface with a boundary (a circular boundary, for simplicity), then limit of summation of the scalar products of ...
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0answers
19 views

Why is Ampere not a derived SI unit? [duplicate]

From my understanding, Ampere is amount of elementary charge per time. So, you should be able to derive it from mol, which is amount, and seconds, which is time. My question: Why is Ampere a base ...
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1answer
28 views

If you charge water will the evaporation rate change?

If you take away electrons or add electrons to a body of water will the evaporation rate be changed? (Even if it's brief or the effect is small)
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1answer
27 views

Are Cosmic Rays net neutral in charge?

As I understand them, Cosmic rays mainly consist of high energy charged particles. I began to wonder if they would eventually net charge the Earth and then assumed that they must come in roughly ...
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25 views

A circuit that is net charged

What differences would you measure if a circuit were significantly charged negatively? Would the resistance change? To be clear, I mean that excess electrons are added to the system. The circuit can ...
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1answer
56 views

Can the fundamental dimension of Electric Charge be Mass only? [closed]

After solving dimensions of electrical equations, I found out that the fundamental dimension of Electric charge is mass only. This also leads to the derivation of dimensions of other Electrical units ...
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37 views

Grounding a capacitor

When one of the plates of an isolated capacitor is grounded, does the charge become zero on that plate or just the charge on the outer surface become zero?
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51 views

Force Acting on a Charge Between Parallel Plates

When a charge (say positive) is placed between an upper positively charged plate and a negatively charged plate, it should experience a repulsive force from the top plate and an attractive force to ...
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1answer
106 views

What happens to charge during laser ablation in water?

One of my friends from lab makes gold nanoparticles in the following manner: He puts a gold plate in water (without surfactants or other additives) He fires laser at the plate After 5 minutes ...
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0answers
22 views

Variations in electric field of a light speed charged particle

From the question " Is there a travelling speed of for electric field? If yes, what is it?" I get to know electric field propagates at speed of light. What if a charged particle which creates this ...
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1answer
58 views

Derivation of magnetic force for a charge in motion relative to a wire (M. Purcell's Electricity and Magnetism)

I have a question regarding the derivation of magnetic force in M. Purcell and David Morin's Electricity and Magnetism. In the first part, they derived the force first by assuming that a charge q is ...
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0answers
17 views

How would a closed conductor with only 1 layer of (atoms/molecules) behave if a charge is placed inside it?

I have quite a few questions actually related to this . Is it possible to have such a situation practically? If theoretically possible, how would the system behave?
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0answers
18 views

Total current - differential equation [duplicate]

Consider the circuit below consisting out of a capacitor C and two identical resistors R. For $t<0$ the switch is open and the capacitor is uncharged. At $t=0$ switch is shut and the circuit is ...
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1answer
20 views

Is $\kappa_e$ caused by charge-carrier transport or electron transport?

$\kappa$ usually symbolises thermal conductivity, a material's ability to conduct heat. $\kappa$ can be expressed with other partial thermal conductivities: $\kappa=\kappa_e+\kappa_{ph}+...$ where ...
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1answer
53 views

Circuit with capacitor and two resistors - total current - charge - differential equation [closed]

Consider the circuit below consisting out of a capacitor C and two identical resistors R. For $t<0$ the switch is open and the capacitor is uncharged. At $t=0$ switch is shut and the circuit is ...
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0answers
29 views

How do scientists measure miniscule constants like the mass and charge and speed of an electron?

What can measure the extremely tiny mass of an electron? Is it through indirect means? The same goes for charge. The pull of a single electron must be infinitely small. And if one is to attempt to ...
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1answer
49 views

If Coulomb and Esu have different dimensions, why can we convert simply by 1C= 3*10e9 esu?

I was always told in school we cannot convert an apple into a potato, so we have to have the same dimensions on both sides. When converting coulomb to esu, we do not seem to bother with dimensions. ...
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1answer
60 views

Why is $U(1)$ special when defining global charges?

For gauge groups like $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ etc. we know that observable states such as mesons or baryons must be charge neutral. However, for a $U(1)$ gauge group we can have charged initial states in ...
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74 views

Why is the Electric Field Zero at this point?

In a Phet Lab simulation, which is all I have at the moment to do my learning on electric field forces, the point represented as colored on the diagram below is shown to have an electric field ...
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2answers
84 views

Force between two point charges moving parallel to each other

When we observe two point charges moving parallel to each other we can see two forces acting on each of the charges: the Coulomb force the magnetic force ($\mathbf{F}=q\mathbf{v}×\mathbf{B}$) ...
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1answer
28 views

What is the purpose of defining an electric field, and how to apply it?

So, I've been reading an introductory book to physics. I've gotten to the point where I understand Coulomb's law, and now the book is introducing electric fields. I'm having a hard time ...
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33 views

Calculating rise in water surface due to a charged capacitor

Two metal plates separated by a distance d & initially charged with charge +Q & -Q are kept so that it just touches the surface of a very large water tank as shown in figure a. Thus water ...
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2answers
94 views

Application of Coulomb's Law

I've just finished reading a section in a book on Coulomb's Law. I'm trying to practice the math a bit and came up with the following: Suppose you have two charges, -5uC ($q_1$) and 7nC ($q_2$). ...
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1answer
37 views

Can I get help with measuring particle charge using oscilloscope?

How can one measure particle charge using oscilloscope and op amp integrator circuit along with a capacitor and faraday cup. I am unable to figure out how to approach. I have the circuit ready but ...
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1answer
68 views

What is the significance of Planck charge?

It seems for me that Planck units are somehow connected to limits where our current knowledge breaks down because of (quantum) gravitational effects. Please correct me if I'm wrong. For example ...
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6answers
182 views

Why does accelerating electron emits photons? [duplicate]

I have read that accelerating or oscillating electron emits photons. But why and how does it so? And why only photons? There are other bosons like gluons, W and Z bosons, so why does electron emit ...
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1answer
47 views

Electron-Positron Annihilation: How is charge conserved at the verticies?

How is reaction possible? The verticies do not conserve charge. Also, why is the arrow for the positron pointing downwards when as time increases, the positron should move towards its vertex? Sorry, ...
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1answer
45 views

Are $Q1$ and $Q2$ attracted or repelled to the sphere shown in the figure below? [closed]

Can you tell from the image below if Q1 and Q2 are attracted or repelled. Will Q2 only be attracted to the sphere if Q2 is enough bigger than Q1? Will the positive charge inside the shell attract ...
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162 views

Can two electrons attract each other?

Due to electrostatic repulsion the two electrons will repel each other as they both possess similar charges, lets leave gravitational attractive force out of the picture my question is can there be ...
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2answers
45 views

How can we prove that electric field originate from and terminate on charge using Gauss Law?

We already know that electric field originate and terminate on charge only and they doesn't make any closed path. But is it possible to prove this statement using Gauss Law ? If yes then how ?
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3answers
54 views

Can we have electronics with charge carriers OTHER than electrons?

Ions perhaps? Or other elementary particles with charge?
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1answer
49 views

What is the distribution of charge on two conducting spheres?

There are two conducting spheres of charges $Q_1$ and $Q_2$ and respective radii of $r_1$ and $r_2$ with center-to-center separation of $L$. Can the distribution of charge on each of the conducting ...
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1answer
59 views

Why can't I measure electric potential from source to point according to this formula

The formula for electric potential of points A and B in the presence of an electric field due to a point charge where $R_a$ and $R_b$ are the distances from source to point A and B respectively is: ...
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3answers
79 views

Is it possible that the charged sphere can lose mass by adding electron?

While studying Electrostatics, I was wondering about whether a charged sphere gains or loses mass while just adding electrons? If it is possible then the negatively charged sphere will have more mass ...
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1answer
37 views

Potential difference of conductor with induced load

If a metallic sphere is grounded and close to a positive charge q, it will be charged with -q. Let's say that the electrons will arrive through the grounding. This charge will cover the surface of the ...
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1answer
65 views

Efficiency of an electric motor? [closed]

Question: An electric motor runs off a 12V d.v. supply and has an overall efficiency of 75%. Calculate how much electric charge will pass through the motor when it does 90J of work. Can someone tell ...
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1answer
42 views

Capacitors and Voltage

Imagine if I have a capacitor, connected to a battery of $12 V$. After charging the capacitor, I increase the plate separation. Then my capacitance decreases, right? But charge should be ...
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0answers
34 views

How can a black hole have a charge? [duplicate]

Under current particle theory, the four fundamental forces use a force-carrying particle. The particle for electromagnetism is the photon. By definition a black hole is a mass from which light can ...
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0answers
43 views

Current in discharging capacitor through fixed resistor?

In the textbook I'm using for physics it says that the charge left on the plates of a capacitor after time $t$, that is discharging through a fixed resistor, is $Q=Q_0e^{-t/\tau}$ where $\tau=RC$ is ...
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1answer
47 views

Question about particles in electric fields. Homework question

I am currently working on a homework question and I realized that I don't really understand some of the material that we covered so I hoped that you guys can help me clear up some misunderstandings. ...
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3answers
1k views

Do quarks violate quantization of charge?

Does existence of various kinds of quarks like up, down, strange, charm, top, bottom violate the quantisation of charge or just redefine it as up quark have charge +2/3 and have -1/3. Or do things get ...
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2answers
32 views

How does magnetic field affects a charge?

If a electron is placed in a fixed magnetic field, how the electron will get influenced by it? How does magnetic field attacts/repulses the charge?
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1answer
93 views

Fleming's left hand rule

in Fleming's left hand rule is the direction of current showing the direction of the flow of electrons or the direction of positive charge?
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103 views

Conducting rod moving through magnetic field

If a conducting rod moves through a magnetic field which way do its electrons move? In my revision guide it shows the following picture (more or less, but the following is my drawing of it -- I ...