-5
votes
1answer
186 views

Why do you experience low-gravity outside the Earth (but near it), and experience more gravity on it?

Spacecraft, satellites, etc. They also experience zero gravity, weightlessness, or "micro gravity" when outside Earth, about 20-300+ miles beyond the escape velocity zone("atmosphere"). However, you ...
0
votes
2answers
154 views

How is space ship's acceleration perceived if the acceleration is perpendicular to the velocity?

Spacecraft in orbit around the Earth are constantly accelerated by the gravitational field of Earth. That's why the spacecraft ($m \ll M$) is in an (elliptical) orbit around the centre of gravity of ...
0
votes
1answer
325 views

Condition for circular orbit

I am a little confused about the condition for circular orbit. Goldstein's Classical Mechanics has the condition for circular orbit as $$f'=0\tag1$$ where $f'$ is the effective force. I understand ...
9
votes
6answers
17k views

Gravity on the International Space Station

We created a table in my physics class which contained the strength of gravity on different planet and objects in space. At altitude 0(earth), the gravitational strength is 100%. On the moon at ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Increasing mass' effect on the balance between centripetal force and centrifugal force

Okay, this is nothing more than a thought experiment which popped into my head while driving home from work today. Take the case of a single body orbiting another, larger body, as in a planet and a ...
4
votes
3answers
391 views

Why don't astronauts in orbit get stuck to the “ceiling”?

When a shuttle is in orbit, it is essentially rotating around the "centre" of the Earth at a great speed. So why does there seem to be no centrifugal force sticking them to the 'ceiling' of the ...