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0
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3answers
63 views

What is the reasoning behind the idea that light cannot escape from a black hole? [duplicate]

According to the definition, light cannot escape from a black hole. How did scientists deduce that light cannot escape from a black hole?
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1answer
38 views

Is there experimental evidence of time order inversion for spacelike events?

The title sums up the question. Given two events separated by a spacelike interval, say one takes place after the other in an inertial frame, then by a suitable boost we may invert the time order of ...
1
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2answers
53 views

Is an achronal set contained in its own causal future?

I use Wald's notation: $I^+$ is the chronological future and $J^+$ is the causal future. My confusion arises from the following passage in Wald (1984): Now, let $S$ be a closed, achronal set ...
6
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3answers
105 views

Why can a particle have a nonzero amplitude outside its forward light-cone?

I'm having trouble grasping an idea that I think that is a very basic part of  quantum field theory. Many introductory QFT resources I have consulted often pose the following question: What is ...
18
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2answers
2k views

What do physicists mean by “information”?

On the question why certain velocities (i.e. phase velocity) can be greater than the speed of light, people will say something like: since no matter or "information" is transferred, therefore the ...
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1answer
88 views

If a point r lies in the boundary of the chronological future of another point p, why does the chronological future of r belong to that of p?

I am studying the global causality of the spacetime. Here, I come across a problem. Suppose a point $r\in \partial I^+(p)$. $I^+(p)$ is the chronological future of a different point $p$ in ...
1
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1answer
118 views

Question about the no-clone theorem

The quantum no-clone theorem states that one cannot "build" a perfect cloning device for arbitrary quantum systems. There also exists a famous thought experiment where Alice transmits information to ...
58
votes
8answers
6k views

The speed of gravity?

Sorry for the layman question, but it's not my field. Suppose this thought experiment is performed. Light takes 8 minutes to go from the surface of the Sun to Earth. Imagine the Sun is suddenly ...
3
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2answers
172 views

Feynman's $i \epsilon$ prescription in loop expansion

I have some questions about the $i\epsilon$ factor in Feynman diagrams. First, what is the physical meaning of $i\epsilon$ in loop amplitudes. Second, how does it ensures unitarity? And third, Dyson ...
2
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3answers
806 views

Sending information faster than light

If I could ever send my friend any information faster than light it would violate causality. If he just guesses the information and acts on it before he could ever recieve it, everything is fine. What ...
0
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0answers
189 views

Is the principle of least action fully equivalent to the Euler-Lagrange equations?

I am citing from Landau and Lifschitz, this statement that will seem to you well-known, trivial, etc: "Between these positions, (i.e. $q_1$ and $q_2$) the system moves then in such a way that the ...
18
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5answers
4k views

Why does the speed of light totally prevent instantaneous information exchange?

Based on the classical light-cone approach it's easy to see you can't transmit information faster than $c$ but why does the speed of light (as far as I know) treat information transmission in this way ...
4
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1answer
477 views

Time-ordering in QFT

In Srednicki QFT page 37. In the derivation of LSZ reduction formula, he introduces the time-order operator $T$, so no time-dependent creation/annihilation operators are left in the transition ...
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0answers
55 views

Is it possible to assign a physical radius to a black hole?

The Schwarzschild metric is given by: $$c^2d\tau^2 = \left(1-\frac{r_s}{r}\right)c^2 dt^2-\left(1-\frac{r_s}{r}\right)^{-1}dr^2 - r^2 \left(d\theta^2 + \sin^2 \theta \, d\varphi^2\right).$$ The ...
-6
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1answer
143 views

Are there any causeless phenomena from the mainstream physical viewpoint? [closed]

EDIT: The orginal version did not produce any answers about physics. I know what life is, I have studied that for decades. I wanted to hear how the border between matter and spirit looks from the ...
3
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0answers
156 views

Testing Many-Worlds Interpretation (MWI) with a causality-violating configuration of “superluminal cables”

Suppose we managed to arrange a causality-violating transmission of data with hypothetical “superluminal cables” (SLC; see both links for respective descriptions) and expect, similarly to ideas ...
0
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3answers
85 views

Why is light different than sound in terms of the assumptions we make regarding causality?

I am having trouble understanding, from a conceptual point of view, why it would be impossible to travel faster than the speed of light. I have read one explanation given in the form of an example ...
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2answers
63 views

Does information paradox in the Many Worlds interpretation cause a problem? [closed]

I'm taking a philosophy of time travel class. In one of the lectures, the teacher was discussing problems with the Many Worlds interpretation. He talked about how since anything that can possibly ...
1
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3answers
82 views

All geodesics are inextendable?

I think the title is true, because geodesics has a tangent vector with a constant length parametrized by an affine parameter. Probably, it is easier to think about timelike or spacelike geodesics. ...
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7answers
7k views

Why is quantum entanglement considered to be an active link between particles?

From everything I've read about quantum mechanics and quantum entanglement phenomena, it's not obvious to me why quantum entanglement is considered to be an active link. That is, it's stated every ...
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2answers
693 views

How would wormhole-based FTL violate causality?

We already have an answer why physically traveling faster than light would violate causality (the clock on board our hypothetical FTL spaceship would tick backwards to some outside observers). ...
2
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4answers
274 views

Can causality be violated?

A common justification for prohibiting many unusual phenomena such as faster than light travel is that if they were possible, causality would be violated. Let's define causality as: You cannot ...
16
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1answer
825 views

Does the heat equation violate causality?

I've ran across the idea that, besides simply writing partial differential equations in covariant form, they need to be hyperbolic with all characteristic speeds less than the speed of light. A ...
2
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2answers
368 views

Are virtual particles limited by the speed of light? [duplicate]

I have recently been reading about Quantum Electrodynamics which I found very interesting, but even more confusing. I understand photons mediate the electromagnetic force and interactions between ...
0
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4answers
124 views

How, in practice, could instantaneous signalling violate causality?

I know that instantaneous signalling can result in different observers not agreeing on the order of events, but how can that result in causality violation in practice? In other words, if one had two ...
18
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5answers
2k views

How does “warp drive” not violate Special Relativity causality constraints?

I'm talking about this nonsense: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2014/06/11/this-is-the-amazing-design-for-nasas-star-trek-style-space-ship-the-ixs-enterprise/ Now, I'm aware that ...
-2
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2answers
97 views

Can you see back in time? [closed]

When you look at the stars, the light that you see is probably hundreds of years old. Which means that you don't know if they still exist. Does all this mean, that if you fly in a speed faster than ...
3
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4answers
162 views

Is it theoretically possible to have a universe where sound travels faster than light $c$? [closed]

We all "know" nothing can travel faster than light. However, if we're allowed to tweak the fundamental constants of nature, is it theoretically possible that such an universe might exist? Update: I ...
1
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2answers
82 views

Mathematical Definition of Locality

What is the mathematically precise definition of principle of locality in physics for a continuous space-time in the sense that an object is only directly influenced by its immediate surroundings?
0
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5answers
230 views

How to determine “timelike”-ness without using a coordinate system?

It has been stated here that: we can say, without introducing a coordinate system, that the interval associated with two events is timelike, lightlike, or spacelike. This assertion appears at ...
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3answers
1k views

What is the Andromeda Paradox?

I have been studying causality (specifically why there is no such thing as a simultaneous instant of time across all observers) recently and I keep hearing references to the Andromeda paradox. Can ...
3
votes
4answers
427 views

Is a causal relationship implied by Newton's 2nd Law?

Throughout my time learning physics I have been imbued with the notion that forces cause accelerations, period. Accelerations don't cause forces, and they aren't merely correlated phenomena. By ...
9
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9answers
1k views

What criteria distinguishes causality from retrocausality?

The brilliant philosopher David Hume remarked that if two events are always found to be correlated to each other with one event happening prior to the other, we call the earlier event the cause and ...
2
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1answer
136 views

In QFT, why do fermions have to anticommute in order to insure causality?

I have seen this question and I believe I understand the answer to it. However, AFAIK, only for bosons the causality condition is a vanishing commutator. For fermions we expect the anticommutator ...
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0answers
11 views

Is Sorkin's causal growth dynamics a Galois Connection

Sorkin is well known for his causal growth dynamics. I think it is a sensible question to ask if his growth dyanamics, which I think can be seen as a poset map (though his work is much more ...
2
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0answers
66 views

If $S$ is a closed achronal set in a spacetime, any timelike curve starting at a point in $I^+[S]$ and ending at a point in $I^-[S]$ interset $S$?

Suppose $S$ is an achronal set in a spacetime $M$. And $S$ is closed. At the same time, any null geodesic of $M$ intersects $S$. Then, why does any timelike curve from $I^+[S]$ to $I^-[S]$ intersect ...
3
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3answers
111 views

How does a photon “know” that it's left one charge and that it's going to another one?

How does it know the same charge it left will be the same charge it will return to? My understanding is photons are neutral and have no charge. i.e. Like charges repel, unlike attract. All charged ...
3
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0answers
26 views

Are closed timelike curves generic feature of ANEC-violating stress-energy tensor?

Kip Thorne has shown that in order to create closed timelike curves (CTCs), one needs stress-energy tensor $T^{\mu\nu}$ that violates averaged null energy condition (ANEC). Will $T^{\mu\nu}$ with ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Misner String Singularity

In correspondence to AdS black hole solutions, what does it mean by Misner string singularities? And when there are no Misner string singularities, what does this mean in terms of curvature ...
2
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2answers
256 views

Why “light cones” have different shapes near black holes?

There is theory that light cone shape does not depend on the reference frame in which it is viewed. So why we draw light cones near black hole differently? I thought that if I am observing (from the ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Light cone and order of events?

If one event lies outside the light cone of another, can the events to some observers appear in a different order in one reference frame compared to the other, and is this the only time when this is ...
1
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1answer
76 views

Understanding the cause of the big bang

Ok, as I understand the expansion of the initial singularity was caused by quantum fluctuations like the ones predicted by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. But how can these fluctuations occur ...
2
votes
2answers
78 views

Is it ok to have two events $A$ and $B$ so that for one person $A$ occurs before $B$ but for another $B$ preceds $A$

Imagine two laser beams A and B are released at the same moment to bounce between two mirrors, A was moving and B was at rest, doing the calculations I found that for a person at rest B would reach ...
0
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1answer
124 views

Problem in Grandfather paradox

I am very confused about a paradox and a recent research on Quantum particles. I have read an article which states that time travel is possible for quantum particles. If it is possible then why does ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

How does the expansion of the universe not violate causality?

It is often said that faster than light travel would violate causality. However, because the universe is expanding, there are actually distant stars that move away from us at a speed greater than the ...
6
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2answers
3k views

Does magnetic propagation follow the speed of light?

Does magnetic propagation follow the speed of light? E.g. if you had some magnet of incredible strength and attached an iron wire that is one light year long to it, would the other end of the iron ...
0
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2answers
457 views

What would happen if some signal could move faster than light?

The two postulates of STR doesn't say that any signal cannot move faster than light. It also doesn't assert that any signal except light cannot have velocity equals to that of light. So at the very ...
1
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3answers
548 views

Why is causality preserved in special relativity?

PART 1: I was reading the article Relativity of simultaneity Wikipedia. I couldn't understand this line: "if the two events are causally connected ("event A causes event B"), the causal order is ...
2
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1answer
101 views

Does negative energy density (i.e. weak energy condition violation) create closed timelike curves?

I remember reading something about Stephen Hawking denying the fact you can't make CTC's (Closed Timelike Curves) without weak energy condition violation. If this is true, where do the light cones ...
1
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4answers
176 views

Principle of locality

Why does the principle of locality have so such great importance in physics that theory should be consistent with it?