Use for force carrier particles, quanta of characteristic quantum fields, usually gauge fields, such as the quanta of electromagnetic fields (photons), of the electroweak interactions (EW bosons), and of the strong interactions (gluons); elastic forces on on a lattice (phonons); nuclear forces (...

learn more… | top users | synonyms

49
votes
6answers
29k views

How exactly does gravity work?

The electromagnetic force and strong and weak forces require particles like photons and gluons. But in case of gravity there is no such particle found. Every mass bearing object creates a ...
38
votes
2answers
4k views

Why is gravity such a unique force?

My knowledge on this particular field of physics is very sketchy, but I frequently hear of a theoretical "graviton", the quantum of the gravitational field. So I guess most physicists' assumption is ...
28
votes
3answers
7k views

Are W & Z bosons virtual or not?

W and Z bosons are observed/discovered. But as force carrying bosons they should be virtual particles, unobservable? And also they require to have mass, but if they are virtual they may be off-shell, ...
24
votes
5answers
4k views

How are forces “mediated”?

I hope this is the right word to use. To me, these forces seem kind of fanciful (except for General Relativity and Gravity, which have a geometric interpretation). For example, how do two charged ...
17
votes
3answers
813 views

Why are all force particles bosons?

All of the force-particles in the standard model are bosons, now my question is pretty short, namely: Why are all force particles bosons? This can't be a coincidence.
12
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is there a search for an exchange particle for gravity?

If I understand correctly, according to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, mass results in a distortion in space-time. In turn, the motion of the mass is affected by the distortion. A result of ...
11
votes
6answers
9k views

Why can't photons have a mass?

Why can't photons have a mass? Could you explain this to me in a short and mathematical way?
11
votes
3answers
230 views

What is a graviton?

We know that a graviton is a hypothetical particle that carries gravitational energy. I have no definite knowledge in string theory, being a student; taking classical gravity into consideration or ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Is the force carrier of the magnetism in a common household magnet a photon?

As I have understood it, the Standard Model includes particles that carry the different forces, e.g. the electromagnetic (EM) force, the gravitational (G) force. When talking about EM fields such as ...
8
votes
1answer
807 views

Why quantising gravity necessarily give us gravitons?

Gravitons are supposed to be the quanta of gravitational field My question is, if we do not know how to quantize gravity yet, how do we know that quantizing it in principle should give us gravitons, ...
8
votes
4answers
244 views

Is there some special case where a fermion can mediate a force?

Looking at the comments of this questions Does the gravitino contribute to the gravitational interaction? and even considering that the answers here in this other question Why are all force particles ...
7
votes
4answers
250 views

Why don't we call the fermions in the standard model force carriers?

Maybe this is a chicken-and-egg problem, but couldn't we call all the bosons fundamental and treat the fermions as force carriers between them? EDIT: After all we never see the asymptotic states of ...
5
votes
3answers
267 views

Gravity - Force or Result?

I am no Physicist, but I enjoy reading about Physics. However reading about leading theories such as M-Theory and others they speculate about the existence of the Graviton. In my past reading of ...
5
votes
4answers
122 views

What carries electric field through space?

A stationary charge "creates" a constant (but not uniform) electric field around it, and a moving charge "creates" a variable electric field around it. What "carries" the information about the ...
5
votes
3answers
149 views

How is the conservation of momentum satisfied in long-range attraction such as electromagnetism and gravity?

I'm not a physicist, but my understanding is that electromagnetism (including attraction between opposite charges) is mediated by the photon, and gravity is probably (hypothetized to be?) mediated by ...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

What is injection level (semiconductor physics)?

I am currently reading journal articles about semiconductor physics in solar cells. What is injection level? I'll try to start off with what I understand. Photons hitting the silicon cause its ...
4
votes
2answers
274 views

How it is possible to mediate a weak interactions by very heavy particle such as Boson?

When considering a weak decay interaction such as leptons , the weak force is mediate by huge particle such as bosons (W+ or W- ). How it is possible to have a such heavy particle within less massive ...
4
votes
3answers
239 views

What do gravitons do?

Yes, I know gravitons are 'just a theory', but I'm wondering how they theoretically act. Are they raining down on everything with mass to "push" other things towards it? Or do the gravitons form a ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Is the Higgs Boson a Force Carrier? [duplicate]

I am told there are four fundamental forces, and each of these forces has a boson that acts as its carrier. Reading this http://www.fnal.gov/pub/science/inquiring/questions/higgs_boson.html I find ...
4
votes
1answer
228 views

Electromagnetic Field VS Photons [duplicate]

I am currently studying electrodynamics with all the fields and the like. Now, as I understand it, in a more modern viewpoint there is a duality between electromagnetic fields and photons, with ...
4
votes
1answer
113 views

Range Of An Interaction

Why is the Compton wavelength $\lambda_c=\frac{\hbar}{mc}$ used as a sensible measure for the range of an interaction, where $m$ is the mass of the corresponding mediator?
4
votes
0answers
73 views

Why are interactions always mediated via bosons (as opposed to fermions)? [duplicate]

Weak, Strong and electromagnetic force are mediated via bosons. I've come across the Walecka-model where the exchange particles are $\sigma$ and $\omega$ mesons; bosons again. why are interactions ...
3
votes
3answers
143 views

Which elementary particles are behind magnetic field, similar as photons behind radio waves?

I see, there are photons behind radio waves. As Wave–particle duality said: the radio waves are waves and at the same time are fluxes of particles called Photons. I'm wondering, what is behind ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Higgs-Boson/Graviton [duplicate]

The Higgs boson gives particles mass. And the graviton is the theoretical force-carrier of gravity. Gravity depends on mass. So if the Higgs Boson gives things mass, it therefore gives them gravity. ...
3
votes
3answers
442 views

Do gravitational waves exist at the quantum level?

Do gravitational waves exist at quantum level produced by electrons or by atoms or by molecules? If yes, which particle produces them and how are they produced? Spacetime exists at a quantum level ...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

How are gravitons supposed to work?

If gravitons are particles, how is it that they can hold us to the ground, or create gravity between two stars millions of miles away from each other?
3
votes
1answer
121 views

Why do massive force carriers result in short range forces

I've been reading the answers to a few questions relating to force carrier particles, and it has been mentioned that massive force carriers always result in short-range forces, while massless carrier ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

What is the relation between interaction range and the mass of gauge bosons?

I have just started to read spontaneous symmetry breaking, where it is mentioned that EM fields are infinite in range, so the gauge boson has to be massless, while for the strong and weak interactions,...
2
votes
1answer
189 views

Why is more intrinsic carriers bad for high temperature semiconductors?

I'm taking a solid state course, and is currently on the subject of dielectrics. In one of the sections, concerning "Impurities in Dielectrics" the books says: "Impurities can also be used to make ...
2
votes
3answers
65 views

How does one experience single gravitons and/or Planck-force?

Moving sufficiently far away from a light source one would not be able to measure a steady stream of light, but only single photons every now an then. The experience would be a very faint blinking. ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Why the minority carrier lifetime is different for electrons and holes?

The lifetime of minority carriers ($\tau_n$ for electrons, $\tau_p$ for holes) represents the average time before recombination. But since an electrons must have a hole for recombination to take place,...
2
votes
1answer
146 views

Potential of particle exchange

There are two heavy particles (of mass $M$) and a light one (of mass $m<<M$). The light particles interact with heavy particle with an attracting dirac delta potential V=$-\delta(q-Q_1)-\delta(q-...
2
votes
0answers
78 views

Is gravity quantized? [closed]

Two uncharged particles are placed in an empty universe one light year apart. In one year, they will feel each other's presence and begin attraction. We are ignoring the uncertainty principle in this ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

How is the EM force exchanged over long distances?

The Situation Imagine we place two charged objects a very far distance apart, essentially making them point charges. How does the EM force interact between the two point charges if virtual photons ...
1
vote
2answers
460 views

How do gauge boson interact with elementary particles?

We know that gauge bosons are the force carriers of fundamental interactions, but how do the gauge bosons themselves interact with particles?
1
vote
3answers
83 views

Can we have electronics with charge carriers OTHER than electrons?

Ions perhaps? Or other elementary particles with charge?
1
vote
2answers
197 views

How can gravitions exist without violating GR? [duplicate]

How can gravitions exist without violating GR, since GR says that gravity is curvature in space-time.
1
vote
2answers
491 views

Virtual photons as force mediators in QED - really?

If the photon is the force vector for EM interactions, e.g. electrons, how does each electron 'know' where the other one is so that it can send it a photon? I've thought about this for a while. I ...
1
vote
4answers
132 views

Graviton and photon

I understand that photon is the carrier of a change in the EM field. Is the graviton a carrier of the gravitational field itself or a carrier of a change in the gravitational field?
1
vote
1answer
572 views

Band Structure and Carrier Recombination/Generation

So i've been a bit confused, looking at PN junction, semiconductors and the like (trying to nail down how exactly semiconductors work, transistors and such). I've read the wiki on band structure (“...
1
vote
1answer
118 views

Are gravitons affected by the force of gravity? [closed]

1) Every particle, including photons, is affected by gravity. Would this be true for gravitons as well? 2) Gravitons should always move at the speed of light, so, if photons are red-shifted while ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Photon as a mediator of electric field

How can a photon (which has momentum) from one electrically charged particle to an oppositely charged particle cause these particles to be pulled toward each other - or how can a magnetic field cause ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

What is the current theory underlying the concept of fields? [duplicate]

When I went to school I was specifically told that fields are material (they occupy some region in space, and they "exist" there) and continuous. Recently, studying quantum physics I came across the ...
1
vote
0answers
66 views

semiconductors extrinsic and intrinsic carriers concentrations equations

I get why $n \cdot p = n_i^2$ in intrinsic semiconductors, but why is that equation also true in the case of extrinsic semiconductor? Here, $n$ is the charge density of the negatively charged ...
1
vote
0answers
231 views

Can we create graviton particle or gravitational wave? [duplicate]

Can we create graviton particle or gravitational wave? I want to know if we able to generate graviton particle out of some energy. Is it theoretically possible? And could we generate gravitational ...
0
votes
2answers
166 views

Particles Associated With Gravitational Waves

I've been reading about linearized GR and the study of gravitational waves, and an odd thought popped into my head. According to wave-particle duality (admittedly, usually used in quantum mechanics!), ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Deriving Coulomb's law from quantum electrodynamics [duplicate]

Is it possible to derive the Coulomb's law using the principles of quantum electrodynamics? How?
0
votes
1answer
81 views

Force-carrying particles instead of forces

Are there physical theories in which notions of particle are used without the concept of force? I know about gauge bosons, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force_carrier and http://en.wikipedia.org/...
0
votes
4answers
117 views

What are “Force Carriers”?

The concept of "force carriers" is hard for me to understand. I can understand "energy carriers". I can understand mass x acceleration but I can't see how this applies. Does anyone have a ...
0
votes
2answers
118 views

How can the uncertainty principle be used to deduce range of a force from properties of the force carrier?

Question: How can the uncertainty principle be used to deduce range of a force from properties of the force carrier? My thoughts? Not too sure how this can be done and would like some advice. ...