Use for force carrier particles, quanta of characteristic quantum fields, usually gauge fields, such as the quanta of electromagnetic fields (photons), of the electroweak interactions (EW bosons), and of the strong interactions (gluons); elastic forces on on a lattice (phonons); nuclear forces (...

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3
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1answer
51 views

How do non-contact forces work?

One question has been bugging me ever since I started learning physics, the textbooks successfully describe the empirical observations but haven't given any reasoning behind it. What I want to ...
3
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0answers
36 views

How do force carrying particles “give” force? [duplicate]

So, I am not taking physics in school, but I do have an interest in it, and I was wondering, in the standard model, all of the force carrying particles (photons, Z Bosons, W Bosons, gluons, and (...
-1
votes
1answer
56 views

Thus, what mediates the electric interaction between two electrons? [duplicate]

We are all learning since kindergarten that the electric interaction is mediated by photons. then you learn this photons are not real, there are real photons, true, but these do not mediate the ...
0
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0answers
27 views

What is meant by interactions being mediated by force-carrier particles?

When a photon interacts with an electron, what is observed to happen? Force-carrier particles are described as the mediators of these interactions. What does this mean and how is this concluded?
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2answers
283 views

How it is possible to mediate a weak interactions by very heavy particle such as Boson?

When considering a weak decay interaction such as leptons , the weak force is mediate by huge particle such as bosons (W+ or W- ). How it is possible to have a such heavy particle within less massive ...
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2answers
51 views

Clarification of the concept of Boson Mediator and 'Mediation' in Physics? [closed]

I would like to have a clear concept of Higgs 'mediator' and that 'mediation' speak in physics, what you 'swap' a particle with ...
-2
votes
1answer
36 views

Do we mean with 'pure energy' the force-carrying particles? [closed]

I often read, hear and talk about pure energy. What is meant by this? Does pure energy consists of the forces between matter, or the force mediating particles, like the massless photons and gluon? I ...
7
votes
4answers
253 views

Why don't we call the fermions in the standard model force carriers?

Maybe this is a chicken-and-egg problem, but couldn't we call all the bosons fundamental and treat the fermions as force carriers between them? EDIT: After all we never see the asymptotic states of ...
2
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1answer
51 views

What is the relation between interaction range and the mass of gauge bosons?

I have just started to read spontaneous symmetry breaking, where it is mentioned that EM fields are infinite in range, so the gauge boson has to be massless, while for the strong and weak interactions,...
5
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4answers
127 views

What carries electric field through space?

A stationary charge "creates" a constant (but not uniform) electric field around it, and a moving charge "creates" a variable electric field around it. What "carries" the information about the ...
0
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4answers
125 views

What are “Force Carriers”?

The concept of "force carriers" is hard for me to understand. I can understand "energy carriers". I can understand mass x acceleration but I can't see how this applies. Does anyone have a ...
1
vote
1answer
120 views

Are gravitons affected by the force of gravity? [closed]

1) Every particle, including photons, is affected by gravity. Would this be true for gravitons as well? 2) Gravitons should always move at the speed of light, so, if photons are red-shifted while ...
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4answers
144 views

Graviton and photon

I understand that photon is the carrier of a change in the EM field. Is the graviton a carrier of the gravitational field itself or a carrier of a change in the gravitational field?
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0answers
44 views

Gravitons, photons and conservation of momentum

How can gravitons be emitted from a mass to cause an attractive force to another mass? The same question could be asked of attractive e-m forces as well. Don't these violate the conservation of ...
3
votes
3answers
146 views

Which elementary particles are behind magnetic field, similar as photons behind radio waves?

I see, there are photons behind radio waves. As Wave–particle duality said: the radio waves are waves and at the same time are fluxes of particles called Photons. I'm wondering, what is behind ...
2
votes
0answers
78 views

Is gravity quantized? [closed]

Two uncharged particles are placed in an empty universe one light year apart. In one year, they will feel each other's presence and begin attraction. We are ignoring the uncertainty principle in this ...
1
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1answer
53 views

Photon as a mediator of electric field

How can a photon (which has momentum) from one electrically charged particle to an oppositely charged particle cause these particles to be pulled toward each other - or how can a magnetic field cause ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

How to understand photons in terms of EM force carrier? [duplicate]

Say, there are 2 stationary electrons placed at a distance. The result of observation would be both flying apart with the same speed and the opposite direction, which would obey laws of conservation ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

What is the current theory underlying the concept of fields? [duplicate]

When I went to school I was specifically told that fields are material (they occupy some region in space, and they "exist" there) and continuous. Recently, studying quantum physics I came across the ...
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1answer
76 views

What are the differences among bosons, force-carrier particles and mediators? [closed]

Are all bosons force-carrier particles? What is the difference between these three concept? Where can I find a comprehensive & detailed information about these particles? How it can be related ...
1
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0answers
68 views

semiconductors extrinsic and intrinsic carriers concentrations equations

I get why $n \cdot p = n_i^2$ in intrinsic semiconductors, but why is that equation also true in the case of extrinsic semiconductor? Here, $n$ is the charge density of the negatively charged ...
3
votes
3answers
454 views

Do gravitational waves exist at the quantum level?

Do gravitational waves exist at quantum level produced by electrons or by atoms or by molecules? If yes, which particle produces them and how are they produced? Spacetime exists at a quantum level ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

How is the EM force exchanged over long distances?

The Situation Imagine we place two charged objects a very far distance apart, essentially making them point charges. How does the EM force interact between the two point charges if virtual photons ...
1
vote
0answers
243 views

Can we create graviton particle or gravitational wave? [duplicate]

Can we create graviton particle or gravitational wave? I want to know if we able to generate graviton particle out of some energy. Is it theoretically possible? And could we generate gravitational ...
1
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2answers
470 views

How do gauge boson interact with elementary particles?

We know that gauge bosons are the force carriers of fundamental interactions, but how do the gauge bosons themselves interact with particles?
0
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1answer
1k views

Deriving Coulomb's law from quantum electrodynamics [duplicate]

Is it possible to derive the Coulomb's law using the principles of quantum electrodynamics? How?
1
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3answers
86 views

Can we have electronics with charge carriers OTHER than electrons?

Ions perhaps? Or other elementary particles with charge?
0
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2answers
134 views

How can the uncertainty principle be used to deduce range of a force from properties of the force carrier?

Question: How can the uncertainty principle be used to deduce range of a force from properties of the force carrier? My thoughts? Not too sure how this can be done and would like some advice. ...
4
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3answers
251 views

What do gravitons do?

Yes, I know gravitons are 'just a theory', but I'm wondering how they theoretically act. Are they raining down on everything with mass to "push" other things towards it? Or do the gravitons form a ...
3
votes
1answer
99 views

How are gravitons supposed to work?

If gravitons are particles, how is it that they can hold us to the ground, or create gravity between two stars millions of miles away from each other?
5
votes
3answers
152 views

How is the conservation of momentum satisfied in long-range attraction such as electromagnetism and gravity?

I'm not a physicist, but my understanding is that electromagnetism (including attraction between opposite charges) is mediated by the photon, and gravity is probably (hypothetized to be?) mediated by ...
3
votes
1answer
124 views

Why do massive force carriers result in short range forces

I've been reading the answers to a few questions relating to force carrier particles, and it has been mentioned that massive force carriers always result in short-range forces, while massless carrier ...
1
vote
2answers
201 views

How can gravitions exist without violating GR? [duplicate]

How can gravitions exist without violating GR, since GR says that gravity is curvature in space-time.
2
votes
3answers
65 views

How does one experience single gravitons and/or Planck-force?

Moving sufficiently far away from a light source one would not be able to measure a steady stream of light, but only single photons every now an then. The experience would be a very faint blinking. ...
0
votes
0answers
225 views

Why does the minority carrier drift current at PN junction remain constant when reverse biased?

I understand the source of this drift current is thermally excited electron hole pair minority carriers, and that minority carrier excitation is constant (and quite low) at constant temperature. ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

How do photons mediate (or create) a force? [duplicate]

Is there a somewhat intuitive explanation as to why the exchange of a photon between two particles causes a force between those particles? Is there a difference in the way massless and massive ...
0
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2answers
43 views

Why the mobilities of holes and electrons are not identical in an intrinsic material?

In an intrinsic material, the lifetime $\tau$ of electrons and holes is the same, so in the equation for mobility, $$\mu = \frac{e\tau}{m^*}$$ the only difference between mobility of electrons an ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

Does carrier concentration at thermal equilibrium depend on doping concentration?

I came across a general equation at thermal equilibrium for carrier concentration that seems to be independent of doping concentration: $$n_0= 2\left( \frac{2\pi m_n^* k_BT}{h^2} \right)^{3\over 2} \...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Force-carrying particles instead of forces

Are there physical theories in which notions of particle are used without the concept of force? I know about gauge bosons, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force_carrier and http://en.wikipedia.org/...
5
votes
3answers
270 views

Gravity - Force or Result?

I am no Physicist, but I enjoy reading about Physics. However reading about leading theories such as M-Theory and others they speculate about the existence of the Graviton. In my past reading of ...
8
votes
4answers
248 views

Is there some special case where a fermion can mediate a force?

Looking at the comments of this questions Does the gravitino contribute to the gravitational interaction? and even considering that the answers here in this other question Why are all force particles ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Why the minority carrier lifetime is different for electrons and holes?

The lifetime of minority carriers ($\tau_n$ for electrons, $\tau_p$ for holes) represents the average time before recombination. But since an electrons must have a hole for recombination to take place,...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Is the Higgs Boson a Force Carrier? [duplicate]

I am told there are four fundamental forces, and each of these forces has a boson that acts as its carrier. Reading this http://www.fnal.gov/pub/science/inquiring/questions/higgs_boson.html I find ...
0
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2answers
167 views

Particles Associated With Gravitational Waves

I've been reading about linearized GR and the study of gravitational waves, and an odd thought popped into my head. According to wave-particle duality (admittedly, usually used in quantum mechanics!), ...
4
votes
0answers
75 views

Why are interactions always mediated via bosons (as opposed to fermions)? [duplicate]

Weak, Strong and electromagnetic force are mediated via bosons. I've come across the Walecka-model where the exchange particles are $\sigma$ and $\omega$ mesons; bosons again. why are interactions ...
4
votes
1answer
233 views

Electromagnetic Field VS Photons [duplicate]

I am currently studying electrodynamics with all the fields and the like. Now, as I understand it, in a more modern viewpoint there is a duality between electromagnetic fields and photons, with ...
11
votes
3answers
235 views

What is a graviton?

We know that a graviton is a hypothetical particle that carries gravitational energy. I have no definite knowledge in string theory, being a student; taking classical gravity into consideration or ...
50
votes
6answers
30k views

How exactly does gravity work?

The electromagnetic force and strong and weak forces require particles like photons and gluons. But in case of gravity there is no such particle found. Every mass bearing object creates a ...
8
votes
1answer
810 views

Why quantising gravity necessarily give us gravitons?

Gravitons are supposed to be the quanta of gravitational field My question is, if we do not know how to quantize gravity yet, how do we know that quantizing it in principle should give us gravitons, ...
4
votes
1answer
115 views

Range Of An Interaction

Why is the Compton wavelength $\lambda_c=\frac{\hbar}{mc}$ used as a sensible measure for the range of an interaction, where $m$ is the mass of the corresponding mediator?