A coherent region of fluid embedded in a fluid with different properties (air in water) or a coherent region of fluid surrounded by a membrane embedded in a fluid which may or may not be different (such as air in a soap membrane).

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Is the acceleration of a soap bubble the standard value of gravitational acceleration?

Is the acceleration of a basic soap bubble the same as the standard value of gravitational acceleration 9.81 m/s^2 when it is dropping in a windless space? I have used the Newton's 2nd law to prove ...
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Bubbly Flow and two phase flow modelling

When we pour vine or some other drink why bubbles move upward and what law they follow or what is the law that describe that motion? One other question If we consider a simple two phase flow between ...
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30 views

Change in radius of a charged bubble

I was thinking about what'd happen to the radius of a bubble, if a charge is uniformly distributed over it. At the beginning, I thought that the bubble would expand, for sure, because of the ...
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Can I blow soap bubbles (of air) inside a vacuum chamber?

When I blow soap bubbles from a liquid dish soap mixed with distilled water at atmospheric pressure at ground level both internal and external air pressure nullify and the tension of the bubbles ...
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175 views

Surface tension and soap bubbles

In a common experiment, you can make a paper clip float on water due to the strong surface tension. Adding just a tiny bit of soap immediately destroys the surface tension and lets the paper clip ...
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86 views

Can an air bubble in a liquid be faster than its terminal velocity

The title says it pretty much. I am wondering if an air bubble in a liquid can move faster (relative to the surrounding liquid) than its terminal velocity?
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Why do soap bubbles rise?

If I have a soap bubble then it will move rather randomly upwards perhaps due to the initial force from me blowing it, and eventually take ground moving downwards. Another answer to a similar ...
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Frost bubble formation

I woke up recently to find the following structures on my lawn; they resemble bubbles, but are formed from ice (we had a moderate frost overnight). There were eight of these 'bubbles' on my lawn and ...
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Would a perfectly clean and perfectly smooth champagne glass have no bubbles?

My understanding is that nucleation sites for bubbles in a champagne glass are either due to defects in the glass or due to fibers in the glass. (See this article for details on that statement.) Does ...
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119 views

Why is there a limited range of possible soap bubble size?

Soap bubbles are never "too small" or "too large". What defines the range of possible diameters of a soap bubble? Related questions: Why do steam bubbles increase in size as they rise, Why is the ...
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37 views

Bubble pressure ascending?

In water bubbles rise up to the surface. As it rises, does the bubble's pressure decrease or stay the same? I think stays the same.
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138 views

What could be added to tap water to reduce air bubble formation on a submerged object?

Submerge your hand in a bucket of water. Some air bubbles appear immediately and others add to the surface of the hand over time. Is there anything that could be added to the water to reduce the ...
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112 views

Bubbles of Different Size

Suppose that I have 2 bubbles of different sizes located in a liquid, and assume that both of those bubbles are close to one another. What exactly will happen to both of those bubbles? From a ...
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What happens to the physics when you scale-up a water and air bubble in zero-gravity to gigantic size? [duplicate]

How to the effects of the various forces in equilibrium vary as you scale up a bubble of air and water in zero gravity from 10cm diameter to planet size? Note that there is only the gravity of the air ...
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Why do bubble wands have ridges?

The bubble wands supplied with children's bubble mixtures seem to fairly universally have a set of ridges around the hole used to create bubbles - for example, see the circle in the upper right of ...
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247 views

Why does a bubble take a spherical shape?

I suspect this has something to do with thermodynamics and the isoperimetric inequality and I'm interested in a mathematical derivation of this result.
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118 views

Two air bubbles inside a liquid

I know that if two air bubbles which are formed inside a liquid are somehow joined using something (say a small tube), then, as the bubble with the larger radius has less pressure and the one with the ...
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61 views

Why would air try to escape from under a pot?

I put a wet Calphalon pot down flat on a wet synthetic countertop. None of the surfaces or liquids was hot. Bubbles started appearing a second or two later from under the rim of the pot in one area. ...
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353 views

Why will two bubbles floating on water surface attract each other?

Two identical bubbles floating on water surface will form clumps, according to the "cheerio effect". But what's the detail about the force? It's necessary to calculate the shape of water surface, in ...
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Why does water sometimes form bubbles when I pour it into a glass?

Sometimes when I'm filling up a container with water from the tap, bubbles will form on the top of the water. They look a little like soap sud bubbles, but there's no soap suds present. I notice, ...
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Is it possible to trap smoke or a smoke like gas inside a glass bubble?

I am a glassblower, and I would like to trap smoke in a glass bubble, my hope is to create an infinitely lingering smoke inside. Is this possible?
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What are the equations of motion of a hole in a soap bubble?

Imagine the following situation: I have a thin stationary water film, like a soap bubble, suspended inside a large ring. I throw a small loop of string onto the film and punch a hole inside it. How ...
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179 views

Bubble in a pipeline

I am just thinking about this phenomenon: We have a horizontal pipeline with a flowing liquid, which contains a small bubble of gas. How do the dimensions of this bubble change when it reaches a ...
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Explaining to a five year old - why don't bubbles run like water

My five-year old daughter was asking about astronauts the other day and why they float in space. After me showing her a few bits on the kids section on the NASA web site I started explaining about the ...
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Are bubbles in ice at a lower or higher pressure than atmospheric pressure?

When water phase-transitions into ice it expands. The water usually contains dissolved air. Freezing forces the air out of the solution into bubbles. Are these bubbles at a lower or higher pressure ...
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Can water pressure ever be high enough to trap gas bubbles or keep them from surfacing?

Can water pressure ever become high enough to trap gas bubbles and/or keep them from surfacing?
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What is the physics behind a soap bubble?

A soap bubble is an extremely thin film of soapy water enclosing air that forms a hollow sphere with an iridescent surface. What fluid dynamical process occurs during the popping of a soap bubble?
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Surviving under water in air bubble

An incredible news story today is about a man who survived for two days at the bottom of the sea (~30 m deep) in a capsized boat, in an air bubble that formed in a corner of the boat. He was ...
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545 views

Stability and lifetime of soap bubbles formed with light gases like helium or hydrogen?

A friend asked me if it would be possible to make soap bubbles out of a gas like hydrogen and if you did, would they float higher, faster. Due to the lower mass of light gases (compared to the air) I ...
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Why is light produced when an underwater bubble is collapsed with a sound wave?

Why is light produced when an underwater bubble is collapsed with a sound wave? I have come across this fact on a page (similar to this) but can't understand "Why". I'm just curious about this ...
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161 views

The effects of heat on gravitational fields

In boiling soapy water, globs of soap coalesce as the temperature increases to boiling. Does this mean that temperature increases the gravitational pull of bodies?
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281 views

Water entering hole at a depth, surface tension

The following is the question that very commonly appears in all HS textbooks. A hollow sphere with a hole is taken to a depth of 40cm when the water starts entering the hole. if the surface tension of ...
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1k views

Ways to create controlled small bubbles in water within plastic tubing

What is a practical way in an engineering or physics laboratory to create bubbles of a specified size in water within plastic tubing? The tubing is a few mm inner diameter. We'd like to make bubbles ...
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397 views

Why do air bubbles stick to the side of plastic tubing?

I'm watching water with air bubbles flow through transparent plastic tubing. The inner diameter is a few mm. Bubbles typically are the same diameter as the tubing, with length about the same or up ...
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922 views

What are the coefficients α, β, and κ in this equation for decompression-induced gas bubble growth?

I am reading a text about gas nuclei I encountered the following formula: $$r = \alpha + \beta \left( \frac{T}{P} \right)^\frac{1}{3} + \kappa \left( \frac{T}{P} \right)^\frac{2}{3}$$ $r$ is the ...
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Solving the Young-Laplace equation for arbitrary axisymmetric geometry

Say I have a non-ellipsoidal soap bubble and I want to numerically analyse the pressure in the inner lobe of this bubble here: The Young Laplace equation gives the pressure difference across a ...