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19
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3answers
800 views

Are the recently observed Dirac monopoles separable?

I just went through Observation of Dirac monopoles in a synthetic magnetic field. What exactly has been observed? More importantly, are these monopoles localized inside the apparatus (no stray ...
19
votes
2answers
1k views

Can bosons that are composed of several fermions occupy the same state?

It is generally assumed that there is no limit on how many bosons are allowed to occupy the same quantum mechanical state. However, almost every boson encountered in every-day physics is not a ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

trying to understand Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC)

I am a computer scientist interested in network theory. I have come across the Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) because of its connections to complex networks. What I know about condensation is the ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

Bose-Einstein condensate in 1D

I've read that for a Bose-Einstein gas in 1D there's no condensation. Why this happenes? How can I prove that?
10
votes
1answer
171 views

How to exchange light and matter?

A while ago an experiment demonstrated that it is possible to stop a light pulse in a supercooled sodium cloud, store the data contained within it, and totally extinguish it, only to reincarnate the ...
10
votes
0answers
270 views

Linear response theory for Gross Pitaevskii equation

I am trying to linearize the following GP eq: \begin{equation} i\partial_{t}\psi(r,t)=\left[-\frac{\nabla^{2}}{2m}+g\left|\psi(r,t)\right|^{2}+V_{d}(r)\right]\psi(r,t) \end{equation} The ansatz for ...
9
votes
4answers
705 views

What happens to those electrons of BEC cold atoms?

BEC cold atoms occupy the same ground state. But what about the electrons or other fermions of the BEC atoms? Are they in the same state? Do electrons of one atom interact with those of another?
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Could the chemical potential of a Bose gas be zero?

Could the chemical potential of a Bose gas be zero ? If it was the case, we will have an infinite number of particles in the ground state ! No ? But I've heard that for $T < T_c$, $\mu = 0$, so I ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

Possibility of Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensions

I remember having a problem (for practice preliminary exams at UC Berkeley) to prove that Bose-Einstein condensation(BEC) is not possible in two dimensions (as opposed to three dimensions): For ...
9
votes
1answer
214 views

Why is the BCS trial function valid across the BEC-BCS crossover?

In one of the two main theoretical approaches used in describing ultracold Fermi gases and the BEC-BCS crossover, the so-called BCS-Leggett approach, the starting point is the BCS trial wavefunction: ...
9
votes
1answer
858 views

Bose-Einstein Condensate with T>0 in Theory and Reality

I am interested to understand how positive entropy Bose Einstein condensation for cold atoms (say) behave. The way I think about it is as follows: We have an ideal pure state where every atom is in ...
9
votes
0answers
117 views

time-dependent Hartree-Fock for two-component bosons

How does the ansatz for the time-dependent Hartree-Fock wavefunction look like in the second quantization if we have two-component boson system and in one case the Hamiltonian commutes with number of ...
8
votes
4answers
14k views

Practical applications for a Bose-Einstein condensate

What are the main practical applications that a Bose-Einstein condensate can have?
7
votes
3answers
327 views

Why do Photons want to be together?

So I've heard that when a photon flies by a atom excited enough to release a photon there's a good chance it will. Because Photons want to be together and have the same direction etc? Is this true? ...
7
votes
3answers
195 views

In a radioactive Bose-Einstein condensate, would all the atoms disintegrate simultaneously?

They're all supposed to do the same thing - so I suppose they would? Also, would the resulting half-life be the same as that of the individual atoms it is made up of?
6
votes
2answers
164 views

Why is chemical potential, μ=0 when calculating critical temperature of BECs?

How do we justify taking the chemical potential, $\mu$ as $0$ when calculating the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BECs)? I apologise as I do not how to use LaTeX, for if I did the ...
6
votes
1answer
470 views

Expansion of multi-particle state vector as a sum of n-entangled states

Physically, quantum entanglement is ranged from full long-range entanglement (Bose-Einstein condensate), described by a basis of states that look like this: $$ |\Psi\rangle = |\phi_{i_{0} i_{1} ... ...
6
votes
1answer
49 views

If all the particles of a Bose-Einstein condensate become entangled with each other,does the system still remain a Bose-Einstein condensate?

I know that an entangled system is found in a single entangled state and that when you try to observe the individual state of a particle from an entangled system using a reduced density matrix, you ...
6
votes
2answers
342 views

Change of basis in non-linear Schrodinger equation

At the mean-field level, the dynamics of a polariton condensate can be described by a type of nonlinear Schrodinger equation (Gross-Pitaevskii-type), for a classical (complex-number) wavefunction ...
6
votes
1answer
208 views

BEC for holography?

I am spending some time reading about Bose-Einstein condensation. I want to know if it is possible to use atom lasers to realize the kind of holography traditionally associated with nano-fabrication. ...
6
votes
0answers
140 views

What is the largest number of bosons placed in a BEC?

What is the record for the largest number of bosons placed in a Bose-Einstein condensate? What are the prospects for how high this might get in the future? EDIT: These guys reported 20 million ...
5
votes
2answers
986 views

What prevents bosons from occupying the same location?

The Pauli exclusion principle states that no two fermions can share identical quantum states. Bosons, one the other hand, face no such prohibition. This allows multiple bosons to essentially occupy ...
5
votes
1answer
175 views

Bose-Einstein condensate for general interacting systems

There is Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) for non-interacting boson systems. Can we prove the existence of BEC for interacting systems?
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Are all bose-einstein condensates superfluid?

I feel like the answer should be "no" since all superfluids are not strictly BEC since they can undergo a Kosterlitz–Thouless transition in 2D, for example. I believe the ideal gas isn't superfluid, ...
5
votes
1answer
194 views

What do we mean when we say Bose condensation? And why can't fermions condense if they don't pair?

In common textbooks, we are told that bosons can condense in a single-particle state because of bose statistics and when the system undergoes a bose condensation, the bose field operator obtains a ...
5
votes
1answer
483 views

Hamiltonians, density of state, BECs

When working with Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in potentials, how can one tell what the density of state of a system of identical bosons given the Hamiltonian, $H$? (I have been told that it is ...
5
votes
0answers
104 views

BEC in a rotating disc

Goodmorning everybody, I have to run a numerical simulation of a Bose-Einstein condensate on a rotating disc. Now, my problem is that I became suspicious about the equation I'm using, since the final ...
5
votes
2answers
315 views

Bose-Einstein condensation and phase transition

I would like to ask the following question for which I cannot find a definite answer in the literature. Of what ORDER is the phase transition leading to Bose-Einstein condensation for a ideal and ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Can a system entirely of photons be a Bose-Einsten condensate?

Background: In Bose-Einstein stats the quantum concentration $N_q$ (particles per volume) is proportional to the total mass M of the system: $$ N_q = (M k T/2 \pi \hbar^2)^{3/2} $$ where k ...
4
votes
1answer
103 views

What is the difference between superfluidity and Bose condensation?

My question is about zero-temperature ground state of a Bose system. Suppose that the system stabilizes a BEC order parameter, say $\langle b^+ \rangle$, and fixes its phase. Is this a superfluid? And ...
4
votes
1answer
641 views

BCS theory, Richardson model and Superconductivity

I'm studying Richardson Model in second quantization. There are many initial points that I don't understand: We supposed that an attractive force between 2 electrons exists, due to electron-phonon ...
4
votes
1answer
92 views

What happens to the planck distribution if the temperature is set to zero?

BE Problem I am currently working on modelling the density of states and optical conductivity of graphene utilizing the GW algorithm. In calculating the exchange self energy of the system, the ...
4
votes
1answer
531 views

Simple & intuitive explanation of superfluidity?

I know that superfluidity is caused by the fluid having zero viscosity. This only happens at very low temperature, so the fluid (e.g. Helium-4) is a Bose-Einstein condensate. I also know that in a ...
4
votes
1answer
849 views

Gross-Pitaevskii equation in Bose-Einstein condensates

I was hoping someone might be able to give a approachable explanation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. All the sources I've been able to find seem to concentrate on the derivation, and I don't have ...
4
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there a spontaneous $U(1)$ symmetry breaking in atomic BECs?

In the theory of Bose-Einstein condensation, one way to define the order parameter is by using the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking. One says that, below the critical temperature, the ...
4
votes
1answer
167 views

First order coherence function in terms of momentum distribution function

Can someone show me how the first order coherence function $G^1(r,r')\equiv \left \langle \hat{\Psi}(r)\hat{\Psi}(r') \right \rangle $ for a system of bosons is related to the momentum distribution ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Looking for a complete review of the BEC-BCS crossover

I'm looking for comprehensive review of the BEC-BCS crossover, both from a theoretical point of view, and from a experimental one. Even something at textbook level, but exhaustive, would be OK, but I ...
4
votes
1answer
214 views

Feshbach resonance in simple terms

I was reading up Feshbach resonances in cold atoms and I was unable to grasp the concept. I will tell you what I have understood. We consider two body scattering processes elastic as well as ...
4
votes
1answer
142 views

Bose Einstein condensation and macroscopic occupation

If have been thought, that Bose Einstein condensation occurs of the ground-state is occupied macroscopically, so $n_0\in \mathcal{O}(N)$ when performing the thermodynamic limit. So naively, this ...
4
votes
1answer
216 views

Correct way to do a Thomas-Fermi approximation for cold gases

I have calculated the total Gross-Pitaevskii energy for a 2D Bose-Einstein condensate in an harmonical trap, using a variational gaussian wave function with a variational parameter b. Now I want to ...
4
votes
0answers
412 views

Toward the establishment of non-equilibrium (quasi-equilibrium) magnon BEC theory

In 2006, Demokritov et al have reported that they have achieved the observation of quasi-equilibrium magnon Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in YIG at finite (room) temperature by using the method ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Why water is not superfluid?

My question is in the title. I do not really understand why water is not a superfluid. Maybe I make a mistake but the fact that water is not suprfluid comes from the fact that the elementary ...
3
votes
1answer
410 views

BCS-BEC crossover

It would be really helpful if somebody could describe what does one mean by a BEC-BCS Crossover. I was going through articles available on the topic, but I was unable to grasp the gist of the topic.
3
votes
1answer
163 views

What does chemical potential $\mu = 0$ mean?

First off, just to be clear, the chemical potential being equal to zero is different from not having a chemical potential at all (e.g. a photon gas)? Now: physically, what does having chemical ...
3
votes
1answer
40 views

Why is the atom loss rate enhanced at the Feshbach resonance?

At the Feshbach resonance, the scattering length is enhanced. But why is the atom loss also enhanced?
3
votes
1answer
230 views

Hamiltonian with Dirac Delta function

I've to compute this expression $$ \hat{H} ~=~\frac{1}{4}g_2\int d^3R\int d^3r\ \bar{\Psi}(\vec{R}+\frac{\vec{r}}{2})\bar{\Psi}(\vec{R}-\frac{\vec{r}}{2}) $$$$ \times \left[ ...
3
votes
3answers
280 views

Bose-Einstein condensation in systems with a degenerate ground state

I understand that when a system enters the BEC phase a sizable fraction of the total number of particles enters the ground state, until at some point almost all of your particles are in the ground ...
3
votes
1answer
41 views

What is “Condensed Light”?

It is mentioned in this article It seems to be a Bose-Einstein condensate of some kind, but it is not exactly clear how one can create a BEC with just photons Light consists of tiny indivisible ...
3
votes
1answer
79 views

When would the Gross-Pitaevskii equation break down as $a\rightarrow \infty$?

It is now common to use Feshbach resonance to tune the s-wave scattering length of a Bose-Einstein condensate. Apparently as $a\rightarrow \infty$, the GPE would break down. The reason is that it ...