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19
votes
3answers
811 views

Are the recently observed Dirac monopoles separable?

I just went through Observation of Dirac monopoles in a synthetic magnetic field. What exactly has been observed? More importantly, are these monopoles localized inside the apparatus (no stray ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

Condensate fraction and single-particle density matrix

In Bose–Einstein condensation (BEC), how to prove the largest eigenvalue of the single-particle density matrix $$\rho_{ij}=\frac{\langle\Psi|a_i^{\dagger}a_j|\Psi\rangle}{N}$$ is $$\frac{1}{N}\sum_{i}{...
19
votes
2answers
1k views

Can bosons that are composed of several fermions occupy the same state?

It is generally assumed that there is no limit on how many bosons are allowed to occupy the same quantum mechanical state. However, almost every boson encountered in every-day physics is not a ...
4
votes
1answer
135 views

What is the difference between superfluidity and Bose condensation?

My question is about zero-temperature ground state of a Bose system. Suppose that the system stabilizes a BEC order parameter, say $\langle b^+ \rangle$, and fixes its phase. Is this a superfluid? And ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

trying to understand Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC)

I am a computer scientist interested in network theory. I have come across the Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) because of its connections to complex networks. What I know about condensation is the ...
9
votes
1answer
873 views

Bose-Einstein Condensate with T>0 in Theory and Reality

I am interested to understand how positive entropy Bose Einstein condensation for cold atoms (say) behave. The way I think about it is as follows: We have an ideal pure state where every atom is in ...
8
votes
4answers
15k views

Practical applications for a Bose-Einstein condensate

What are the main practical applications that a Bose-Einstein condensate can have?
6
votes
1answer
473 views

Expansion of multi-particle state vector as a sum of n-entangled states

Physically, quantum entanglement is ranged from full long-range entanglement (Bose-Einstein condensate), described by a basis of states that look like this: $$ |\Psi\rangle = |\phi_{i_{0} i_{1} ... ...
5
votes
1answer
181 views

Bose-Einstein condensate for general interacting systems

There is Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) for non-interacting boson systems. Can we prove the existence of BEC for interacting systems?
3
votes
0answers
138 views

Are gravastars observationally distinguishable from black holes?

Are observations of Hawking radiation at the acoustic event horizon in Bose-Einstein condensates consistent with gravastars? To reconcile the second law of thermodynamics with the existence of a ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

Bose-Einstein condensate in 1D

I've read that for a Bose-Einstein gas in 1D there's no condensation. Why this happenes? How can I prove that?
9
votes
4answers
731 views

What happens to those electrons of BEC cold atoms?

BEC cold atoms occupy the same ground state. But what about the electrons or other fermions of the BEC atoms? Are they in the same state? Do electrons of one atom interact with those of another?
7
votes
2answers
205 views

Why is chemical potential, μ=0 when calculating critical temperature of BECs?

How do we justify taking the chemical potential, $\mu$ as $0$ when calculating the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BECs)? I apologise as I do not how to use LaTeX, for if I did the ...
6
votes
0answers
161 views

What is the largest number of bosons placed in a BEC?

What is the record for the largest number of bosons placed in a Bose-Einstein condensate? What are the prospects for how high this might get in the future? EDIT: These guys reported 20 million ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Are all bose-einstein condensates superfluid?

I feel like the answer should be "no" since all superfluids are not strictly BEC since they can undergo a Kosterlitz–Thouless transition in 2D, for example. I believe the ideal gas isn't superfluid, ...
4
votes
1answer
588 views

Simple & intuitive explanation of superfluidity?

I know that superfluidity is caused by the fluid having zero viscosity. This only happens at very low temperature, so the fluid (e.g. Helium-4) is a Bose-Einstein condensate. I also know that in a ...