The tag has no wiki summary.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

18
votes
2answers
807 views

Can bosons that are composed of several fermions occupy the same state?

It is generally assumed that there is no limit on how many bosons are allowed to occupy the same quantum mechanical state. However, almost every boson encountered in every-day physics is not a ...
19
votes
3answers
632 views

Are the recently observed Dirac monopoles separable?

I just went through Observation of Dirac monopoles in a synthetic magnetic field. What exactly has been observed? More importantly, are these monopoles localized inside the apparatus (no stray ...
9
votes
1answer
722 views

Bose-Einstein Condensate with T>0 in Theory and Reality

I am interested to understand how positive entropy Bose Einstein condensation for cold atoms (say) behave. The way I think about it is as follows: We have an ideal pure state where every atom is in ...
6
votes
1answer
432 views

Expansion of multi-particle state vector as a sum of n-entangled states

Physically, quantum entanglement is ranged from full long-range entanglement (Bose-Einstein condensate), described by a basis of states that look like this: $$ |\Psi\rangle = |\phi_{i_{0} i_{1} ... ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

Gravastars: Are they observationally distinguishable from Black-Holes?

Are observations of Hawking radiation at the acoustic event horizon in Bose-Einstein condensates consistent with Gravastars? To reconcile the second law of thermodynamics with the existence of a ...
9
votes
4answers
481 views

What happens to those electrons of BEC cold atoms?

BEC cold atoms occupy the same ground state. But what about the electrons or other fermions of the BEC atoms? Are they in the same state? Do electrons of one atom interact with those of another?
9
votes
4answers
1k views

Bose-Einstein condensate in 1D

I've read that for a Bose-Einstein gas in 1D there's no condensation. Why this happenes? How can I prove that?
3
votes
1answer
141 views

Simple & intuitive explanation of superfluidity?

I know that superfluidity is caused by the fluid having zero viscosity. This only happens at very low temperature, so the fluid (e.g. Helium-4) is a Bose-Einstein condensate. I also know that in a ...