A black hole is a volume from which photons, or any matter, can not escape. More formally, the coordinate speed of light at the event horizon - the boundary of a black hole - is zero, as measured by a sufficiently separated observer.

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Flat space limit of the Schwarzschild metric and Hawking temperature

The Schwarzschild metric reduces to the Minkowski metric in the limit of vanishing $M$, but the Hawking temperature which is proportional to $1/M$ diverges in the same limit. This would imply that ...
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Where does information go if thermodynamic death?

Often read that until Hawking the black holes were introducing a problem with information. Allegedly information should be unable disappear, while this was happening in classic black holes. What ...
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Seeing one's back on the event horizon

If we would hypothetically be exactly on the event horizon, we should see our own back, because of the circular motion of photons on the event horizon, right? But what would be the image size, or $-$ ...
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What would happen if a negative mass crossed the event horizon of a black hole?

If negative mass really existed and somehow a very fast traveling negative mass object reached near the black hole's event horizon. What would happen when it crosses the event horizon? According to ...
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What would a rotating black-hole look like to a “geo-stationary” observer orbiting the black hole

A rotating black hole is believed to contain a ring singularity rather than a point. However, if an astronaut is orbiting the black hole at exactly the same angular velocity as the blackhole (in ...
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I need help understanding a step in the derivation of the Schwarzschild solution

I am looking at Wikipedia's article on deriving the Schwarzschild solution. In the section "Simplifying the components", it says, On the hypersurfaces of constant $t$ and constant $r$, it is ...
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Which gets you first when you are falling into a black hole, the black hole singularity or the cosmic background radiation?

If you look up while you are falling into a black hole you see the universe blue shifted, that is, you see the universe moving quickly forward in time compared to your local time. Since this effect ...
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What is the Schwarzschild metric with proper radial distance?

Reading the marvellous book "The Membrane Paradigm" I stumbled upon a suggested change of variable that I'm not able to deal with. Starting with the usual Schwarzschild metric for the spatial ...
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What would happen if a supermassive blackhole at the center of a galaxy evaporates?

Well the title says it all but I will just explain it in detail a bit. We know that a blackhole eventually has to evaporate due to the hawking radiation. It is also said that the blackholes at the ...
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Are different frequencies of light lensed differently during gravitational lensing a bit like refraction?

So I was wondering about the event horizon on a black hole. And wondering if the point of no return for radio waves vs gamma rays would be different. I guess the logic being, since gamma rays have ...
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Another faster-than-light question

Imagine we have something very heavy (i.e supermassive black hole) and some object that we can throw with 0.999999 speed of light (i.e proton). We are throwing our particle in the direction of hole. ...
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What will the universe look like for anyone falling into a black hole?

I've heard that, from the perspective of an external observer, something falling into a black hole will eventually look "frozen": light waves will move to the infrared and further into lower ...
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Can we see a spaceship falling into a black hole and entering the event horizon?

Or it pauses in time because the spaceship reaches the speed of light, c?
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What happens to a photon in a black hole?

Assume a photon enters the event horizon of a black hole. The gravity of the black hole will draw the photon into the singularity eventually. Doesn't the photon come to rest and therefore lose it's ...
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How does the Hawking Radiation mechanism cause a black hole to lose its mass? [duplicate]

Correct me if I am wrong: in the Hawking Radiation mechanism, when a virtual particle-antiparticle pair gets created at the edge of the black hole, a black hole could sometimes eat up one of the ...
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What happens to a photon when it enters a black hole?

The photon has a mass of 0, but it has energy because of its motion. When it is sucked into the black hole and becomes a singularity, it loses its energy because it is no longer moving. It is not ...
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What is the effect of gravity on gamma rays?

I read an article about a Gamma Ray burst linked to a black hole. How does high gravity fields affect gamma rays?
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Entropy of a naked singularity

According to the wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naked_singularity: "Some research has suggested that if loop quantum gravity is correct, then naked singularities could exist in nature, ...
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The Uncertainty Principle and Black Holes

What are the consequences of applying the uncertainty principle to black holes? Does the uncertainty principle need to be modified in the context of a black hole and if so what are the implications ...
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Gravity from a singularity as distance approaches zero

If you had a singularity (that had mass but took up no space), what would happen to the acceleration of an object as it approached this singularity? I would assume that it would be infinite, since as ...
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Can a trapped surface be formed by a mass configuration outside of that trapped surface?

Can a trapped surface be formed without any massive bodies inside that trapped surface, but only by a configuration of massive bodies surrounding the trapped volume?
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What happens at the center of a black hole according to holographic theory?

As far as I understand, the AdS/CFT correspondence proposed by Maldacena is an exact duality to a four-dimensional theory, which interpolates between one well-defined conformal field theory in the UV ...
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How far has a black hole to be in order for its tidal forces to disintegrate earth?

I don't know if this question can be answered to honest but I though I might try ask just in case someone can calculate that. What I need to know here is how strong should the tidal forces be to start ...
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Behavior of black holes in higher- and lower-dimensional space-times

The behavior of black holes in 3+1 dimensional space-time as our own is rather well known: formation, event-horizon size, mass, spin, radiation etc. However, my question is what would black holes ...
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Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How can anything ever fall into a black hole as seen from an outside observer? Is black hole formation observable for a distant observer in finite amount of time? ...
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How does nature prevent transient toroidal event horizons?

How does nature prevent transient toroidal event horizons?.. and does it really need to? Steps to construct a (transient) toroidal event horizon in a asymptotically flat Minkowski spacetime: take a ...
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Why can't a stable star have radius 1 < r < 9/8 its Schwarzschild radius?

From http://www.spacetimetravel.org/ssm/ssm.html : A mass of 1.78 [in geometric units] corresponds to a ratio of radius to Schwarzschild radius of 9/8. Theory predicts that a smaller ratio is not ...
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Information about an expanding event horizon

Assume an observer sent a beam of photons close to an event horizon, say at some distance x (a distance far enough to avoid the photons falling in.) This light would still be observable, albeit red ...
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When does a singularity start to exist during a black hole formation?

Excuse me if the question is naïve. I am not a physicist. Let's imagine formation of a black hole from a homogeneous collapsing star. At certain moment when enough of matter is inside of a small ...
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How can black hole increase its mass?

From observer point of view an object, which falls into black hole never crosses its horizon. Then how does black hole appears and grows its mass? Or does any black hole looks (and feels by all other ...
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Can a person at a photon sphere of a black hole decide where the black hole is?

A person at the photon sphere of a black hole will observe the following: The black hole surface will cover exactly half of the visible sky (say, the left half), and cosmic horizon will cover the ...
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“WLOG” re Schwarzschild geodesics

Why, when studying geodesics in the Schwarzschild metric, one can WLOG set $$\theta=\frac{\pi}{2}$$ to be equatorial? I assume it is so because when digging around the internet, most references seem ...
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Does black hole evaporation respect quantum superpositions?

I've confused myself about the following scenario: Suppose you make a black hole out of states with spin aligned into one direction, say the positive x-direction, and let's call this "up". Then the ...
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What do you feel when crossing the event horizon?

I have heard the claim over and over that you won't feel anything when crossing the event horizon as the curvature is not very large. But the fundamental fact remains that information cannot pass ...
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Are “typical” black holes rotating, or stationary?

From my (somewhat limited) understanding of GR I know that there are two different kinds of solutions that produce a black hole, some that rotate and some that do not. What I can't figure out from my ...
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Decoherence inside black holes [closed]

I have a question about decoherence. Assume there is a macroscopic black hole floating around and you have some macroscopic object with you with a huge number of internal degrees of freedom. ...
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Can gravitational waves escape from inside of black holes? [duplicate]

I understand that light cannot escape from inside of an event horizon because the spacetime curvature is too warped for photons to escape. On the other hand, gravitational waves are ripples of ...
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Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates: Why $\ln(r-2m)$ instead of $\ln|r-2m|$?

If one considers the Schwarzschild metric $$ \text d s^2 = -V(r)\text d t^2 + \frac{1}{V(r)}\text d r^2 + r^2 \text d \Omega^2\;,\qquad V(r) = 1-\frac{2m}{r}\;, $$ and introduces the ...
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If nothing ever falls into a black hole, why is there a puzzle about information?

From an outside perspective, nothing can ever pass the event horizon. It just scooches asymptotically close to the event horizon. So (from our perspective on earth), when a black hole reduces in ...
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Supernovae and black holes?

I think i am correct in saying that a supernova ($Type$ $II$) is caused by the collapse of the core of a giant star. This contraction of the core is stopped by the Pauli exclusion principle and the ...
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Derivation of metric of space time with a point source in 2+1 dimension using ADM formalism

In "Quantum Gravity in 2+1 dimension" by S Carlip, Sec 3.1 (where the metric of a spacetime with a point source is derived, using the ADM formalism), equation 3.8 states that (this is the momentum ...
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How exactly are the degrees of freedom seen by a falling into a black hole observer related to the ones seen by a staying outside observer?

This is some kind of a follow up of this nicely to the point answer to a provocative (but nevertheless upvoted!) question, about the legitimacy of black hole physics. The answer mentions, that the ...
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Photon Escape Angle From Black Hole

Consider a photon source emitting photons near the surface of a Schwarzschild black hole. What angle, as a function of the source's radius from the event horizon, must the photons be emitted at such ...
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Diving into a charged (Reissner-Nordstrom) Black hole

Apparently there are two event horizons in this type of black hole, where the second one is known as the Cauchy horizon. According to Carroll, if you go into the first one, you will fall until you ...
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Simulating a black hole binary system

As part of a project for my degree I am writing code to simulate N-body gravitational interactions, however I have to then use this code to investigate something. Struggling to think of ideas I ...
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Could a ship equipped with Alcubierre drive theoretically escape from a black hole?

Could a ship equipped with Alcubierre drive theoretically escape from a black hole? Also, could it reach parts of the universe that are receding faster than the speed of light from us?
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What role does electrical charge play in black holes?

Not having studied General Relativity, I have sometimes been puzzled by references to the behaviour for "classic" black holes — as they are popularly portrayed — as being true for black ...
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Do all of our discoveries of black holes in nature depend on the validity of GR?

In the question Is there a black hole in the centre of the Milky Way? the answer by Motl seems to all but say the existence of that black hole is a fact (see also Evidence for black hole event ...
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How long does it take a black hole to eat a star?

I presume the answer is that it depends on the mass and size of the star and black hole, but I was wondering if somebody could provide some rough bounds (e.g. hours vs thousands of years). By ...
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Do singularities have a “real” as opposed to mathematical or idealized existence?

I was thinking of, for example a Schwarzchild metric at r=0, i.e. the gravitational singularity, a point of infinite density. I realise that there are different types of singularities--timelike, ...